‘B-schoolers need to be creative, connected, conscientious’

Jean-Pierre Helfer, former Dean, Paris-Sorbonne Business School, speaks at the inauguration of XIME, Chennai. Seated are: Hema Mani, a student of the first batch of XIME; J Alexander, Chairman, XIME, Kochi; B Santhanam, President, Saint Gobain; PC Cyriac, Chairman, XIME, Chennai; and Prof J Philip, Founder Dean, XIME

Jean-Pierre Helfer, former Dean, Paris-Sorbonne Business School, speaks at the inauguration of XIME, Chennai. Seated are: Hema Mani, a student of the first batch of XIME; J Alexander, Chairman, XIME, Kochi; B Santhanam, President, Saint Gobain; PC Cyriac, Chairman, XIME, Chennai; and Prof J Philip, Founder Dean, XIME

The world of work has changed and today’s business school students need to be collaborative, creative, connected and driven by conscience, said B Santhanam, President & MD, South Asia, Saint Gobain Glass, delivering the inaugural address at the launch of the new Chennai campus of the Xavier Institute of Management & Entrepeneurship (XIME) in the manufacturing hub of Oragadam, about 30 km from the city.

Santhanam said that today, businesses can no longer operate on the age-old adage espoused by economist Milton Friedman, that the only social responsibility of businesses is to make profits for their stakeholders. “If you asked someone a few years ago, what is the most important characteristic that you must possess, in order to succeed in business, most would have said that to be competitive is at the heart of being successful,” he said. However, being narrowly competitive no longer guarantees success. The ability to collaborate is now an absolute necessity. The last and the most important dimension of change is that the world is suddenly beginning to wake up to its conscience. Capitalism is now focused on building trust, compassion, collaboration and value creation. “The era of conscious capitalism has just begun,” he added.

Santhanam proposed a framework to the students and faculty, which he called ‘i10 Leadership Traits’, drawn from success stories of many leaders, and if inculcated, will lead to increased impact.

The framework, he explained, has 10 interrelated traits that contribute to effective leadership: intelligence, not analytical but emotional and social; information through knowledge, framework, linkages; insight into markets, customer and industry trends; imagination in envisioning the future and being unconstrained by resources; intensity through passion, drive and involvement; inspiration to be a visionary, role model and get others to commit; influence through persuasion, consensus, team-work and collaboration; impact through clarity of communication, personality and connect with people; and independence by being autonomous, self-motivated, possessing edge and power balance.

Prof Jean-Pierre Helfer, former Dean, Paris-Sorbonne Business School, talked of three revolutions that are changing the face of business and will impact today’s management students. The first is the absolute necessity for companies to integrate CSR into their approach. Companies have also to be very agile. “The victorious companies are the ones that adapt, those who know how to innovate, how to change markets and those who know how to reinvent business models that lead them to blue oceans instead of staying in wild competition spaces,” he explained.

The second revolution, explained the professor, is that teachers of pure management are less important today. The managers of tomorrow, he says, need an openness towards the world, openness towards philosophy, art, geography. “Marketing remains useful, but sociology and psychology are essential. Finance cannot be ignored but the philosophy to better understand whom finance is serving is a priority. Our students want theatre classes to learn how to behave on the business scene; they want courses on art and culture,” he elaborated.

Lastly, referring to the third revolution, Prof Helfer said today, schools and universities can no longer live in a closed space of students and their families. The ecosystem is large and there are a multitude of stakeholders to satisfy today, from international accreditation bodies that come to audit schools, to journalists who want to rank and compare B-schools.

Prof J Philip, Founder and President, XIME, said the opening of the Chennai B-school, the third after Bengaluru and Kochi, is a dream come true for him. The first batch had commenced in Bengaluru in 1995. Philip said that since Oragadam is a manufacturing hub, the focus will be on manufacturing analytics, HR, supply chain management. “We hope to make a significant contribution to the ‘Make in India’ movement,” he said. Around 60 students make up the first batch of XIME in Chennai.

Others who spoke at the inaugural were PC Cyriac, Chairman, XIME, Chennai, and J Alexander, Chairman, XIME, Kochi, both senior, retired IAS offices.

[“Source-thehindubusinessline”]

Whyness Worldwide wins Godrej Locking Solutions and Systems’ creative biz

Whyness Worldwide wins Godrej Locking Solutions and Systems' creative biz

Whyness Worldwide has been handed the creative mandate for Godrej Locking Solutions and Systems, one of India’s most iconic brands.

This union is a second strategic coming together of Godrej and Whyness, as this follows immediately after Godrej having awarded Whyness with the creative duties of its upcoming premium furniture brand.

Godrej Locking Solutions and Systems now looks to deepen its brand footprint and consolidate its presence and reach in a market that it has dominated for decades. Whyness will bring its expertise in traditional and digital communication, as well as design and data, to galvanise a brand that has an ideal mix of heritage and future-ready capabilities.

Shyam Motwani, executive vice president and business head, Godrej Locking Solutions and Systems, said, “This is a strategic partnership to burnish the brand and re-connect and engage with all key stakeholders. We look forward to a very exciting future for our iconic brand in the coming years.”

Ravi Deshpande, the founder and chief creative officer of Whyness Worldwide, added, “You can find a Godrej lock on almost every Indian home door, and it has been so since my childhood days. It is with great pride therefore that we at Whyness accept stewardship duties for this most famous of brands. Charting the future course of this iconic brand across platforms and media is a challenge gladly accepted.”

[“Source-economictimes”]

Creativeland Asia bags Havmor’s creative mandate

Creativeland Asia bags Havmor's creative mandate

Havmor has assigned its creative duties to Creativeland Asia following a multi-agency pitch.    Chaitanya Rele, VP – head of marketing, Havmor Ice Cream, said, “Havmor has been on a fabulous journey of definition and redefinition over the last few years. As we continue on this path of growth, we are very excited to partner and work with Creativeland Asia. Through a tight pitch process, Creativeland Asia’s out of the box thinking and a genuinely innovative approach to the category really stood out. We look forward to working with the team at Creativeland Asia in creating real and impactful communication that really brings our brand to life.”   Sajan Raj Kurup, founder and creative chairman, Creativeland Asia said, “Havmor is amongst the fastest growing ice cream brands in the country. They are in a unique position as the only non-dairy player in India making 100 per cent real milk ice cream.We will leverage this positioning and design a communication strategy for the brand that breaks through the clutter.There is no doubt that immense competition in this category exists, but we want to make sure we stand out. We had a clear vision for Havmor when we presented our ideas during the pitch phase. They have ambitious plans for the market and the category and we are sure that together, we will be able to achieve what we have planned.”

[“Source-campaignindia”]

World Cup 2018 and 2022: Fifa releases bid ‘corruption’ report

Fifa World Cup 2022 bid

Qatar was awarded the 2022 World Cup in 2010, with Russia given the 2018 tournament

Football’s world governing body Fifa has released its full report into alleged corruption in the 2018 and 2022 World Cup bids.

It comes after German newspaper Bild published extracts of a leaked copy of the report on Tuesday.

The 2014 report was authored by former Fifa independent ethics investigator Michael Garcia.

He quit in protest when the organisation only released a 42-page summaryof his document.

That version cleared Qatar and Russia of corruption allegations but was critical of the English Football Association’s conduct in the bidding process.

Fifa said its president Gianni Infantino had always intended to release the full document, which has more than 400 pages, but its former ethics chiefs had refused to publish it.

The former chairmen of the ethics committee, Cornel Borbely and Hans-Joachim Eckert, were replaced in May after completing four-year terms.

Speaking in October 2014, Eckert said: “Publishing the report in full would actually put the Fifa ethics committee and Fifa itself in a very difficult situation legally.”

Fifa said it had intended to discuss the release of the report at a meeting next month, but added: “As the document has been illegally leaked to a German newspaper, the new chairpersons have requested the immediate publication of the full report in order to avoid the dissemination of any misleading information.

“For the sake of transparency, Fifa welcomes the news that this report has now been finally published.”

Why was the investigation started?

Garcia was appointed as Fifa’s independent ethics investigator in 2012 and asked to look into the 2018 and 2022 World Cup bidding process following claims of corruption around the bids.

They included allegations that disgraced Qatari football official Mohamed Bin Hammam made payments totalling $5m (£3m) to football officials in return for their support for the Qatar bid.

Qatar vehemently denied votes were being bought and said Bin Hammam had not been acting in an official capacity.

Garcia spent two years investigating the claims and looked into all nine hosting bids – including one by the England FA.

Russia won the right to host the 2018 World Cup, beating England as well as joint bids by the Netherlands/Belgium and Spain/Portugal.

At the same time, in December 2010, Qatar won the 2022 bid ahead of Australia, Japan, South Korea and the United States.

What were the findings?

Fifa released a 42-page summary of Garcia’s final report in 2014. It cleared Qatar of any wrongdoing, ending any possibility of a re-vote for a new 2022 host.

However, the report said there were “certain indications of potentially problematic conduct of specific individuals” – though Bin Hammam’s payments were judged to be for his personal political interests, not the 2022 bid.

Russia, meanwhile, was also cleared of any wrongdoing, though the investigation had “only a limited amount of documents available for review” because the Russian team’s computers had been destroyed.

The English FA was accused of acting improperly in trying to win votes and flouting bid rules, while Australia too received criticism.

What was the reaction?

While Russia and Qatar welcomed the report, the FA baulked at the criticism.

The man who led the investigation, Garcia, complained Eckert’s precis of his report was “erroneous”.

Eckert denied that, insisting of his published summary: “A lot of my report was word for word from the Garcia report.”

Garcia subsequently quit and Fifa’s critics said it showed the shortened, released report had been a “whitewash” and called for the full report to be released.

Almost three years later, they have got their wish.

[“Source-bbc”]