Creativity for change: how these artists remind us that progress must come with a purpose

Kochi-Muziris Biennale

The fourth edition of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale features creative works by 95 artists in 10 locations around the heritage Fort Kochi district, as well as nine satellite venues. See Part Iand Part II of our photo essays, as well as our coverage of the Bangkok Biennale.

From politics to nature, the art works in this photo essay point a way to hope in their own creative manner. For example, some artists go beyond paints and sculptures to show how ropes (Mrinalini Mukherjee) and seashells (Julie Gough) can be used in installations.

Crushed dreams, the sorrow of conflict, and displacement after natural calamities leave deep scars on society (Rula Halawani, Srinagar Biennale, Chittoprasad Bhattachary). Social divides continue to thrive even after the end of the colonial era (BV Suresh). Rising corruption plagues emerging economies, holding back their right to progress. Reckless urban and rural development wreak havoc on habitat and nature.

It takes sensitisation and a demand for justice to dissect and tackle social-political problems. The artists in this photo essay go beyond images of doom and gloom to show that creative solutions can indeed be found, and in a sustainable manner. They raise awareness about the importance of human rights, dignity, identity, inclusion and expression (Zanelle Muholi; the Braille edition of the Biennale brochure).

“Success for an artist comes from the happiness of making a connect with the audience. It comes from sensitising them to the loss of others, and helping them be grateful for what they have,” said painter-photographer Manisha Gera Baswani, in a chat with YourStory.

Her exhibit, titled Postcards from Home, features photographs of Indian and Pakistani artists whose parents moved across the border during partition. Those who have overcome their sense of loss and displacement in a dignified manner are a source of inspiration for the next generation, she explains.

She advises aspiring artists to listen to their heart, and have faith that the impact of their work will eventually emerge. This is particularly important in a time of international tension and domestic conflict, Manisha urges.

Now, what have you done today to pause and take stock of the world around us, and do your bit to create a better place for us all?

[“source=yourstory”]

The impossible Cricket World Cup selection puzzle that looms

Steve Smith and David Warner are fully expected to be included in the 15-man World Cup squad.

It’s becoming increasingly hard for selectors to find the weak links in Australia’s ODI line-up as they stew over who to tap on the shoulder when Steve Smith and David Warner return.

The two, whose year-long suspensions expire later this month, are fully expected to be included in the 15-man World Cup squad that must be submitted by April 23.

Australia travel to the UAE for a five-match ODI series after Wednesday’s decider against India.

[“source=foxsports”]

On Women’s Day, IIT students launch roll-on that promises to relieve period pain

IIT-Delhi incubated startup Sanfe on Friday launched an offering that promises to make women’s lives easier every month: a roll-on to relieve period pain. Launched on International Women’s Day, the Sanfe Period Pain Roll-on will allieviate menstrual cramps and ease mood swings.

The essential oil-based roll-on is naturally formulated and has been medically tested and FDA approved. Sanfe Period Pain Relief Roll-On, available in 10 ml bottles, costs Rs 10 for a single use.

Sanfe was co-founded by Archit Agarwal and Harry Sehrawat, third year BTech students at IIT-Delhi. The roll-on was developed by them with the help of their professor, Dr Srinivasan Venkataraman.

Sanfe
Archit and Harry at the launch of the Sanfe Period Pain Roll-on on International Women’s Day.


Also read: At just Rs 10, this pee device makes using public toilets safe, stress-free for women


“Women comprise 50 percent of our population and a significant portion of this population experiences pain and cramps during menstrual period. Therefore, this becomes an important problem to solve,” said Srinivasan, a Professor of the Department of Design.

Archit and Harry previously launched Sanfe Stand & Pee on World Toilet Day, last year. The device enables women to stand and urinate, preventing Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) infections from unhygienic public washrooms.

Menstrual cramps often come in the way of women’s daily routine and companies have been developing feminine products to fight this. Brands, including Peesafe and Sensur, have also launched roll-ons to ease menstrual cramps.

Archit and Harry’s eureka moment was when one of their friends complained of not performing well in the semester exam, due to period pain.

“We realised that period pain forces over 40 percent of women to miss their daily routine. Motivated by this, we started working on a solution to relieve women from menstrual cramps,” the duo said.

They spent seven months on Research & Development. “We don’t want women to suffer because of a natural body function. We figured this problem and designed the roll-on,” said Archit, a BTech Textile Technology student.

[“source=yourstory”]

Police warn parents of 14 apps that could be dangerous for kids

LAS VEGAS (KSNV) – Law enforcement agencies across the country are warning parents of 14 popular apps that could put kids in danger of predators.

Police are urging parents to check their children’s phones and the apps on their devices as this is the best way to defend against possible predators.

Some tips to protect children according to police are:

  • Approve every app on your kid’s phone
  • Check their privacy settings
  • Speak with your children about phone use, app use and social media

14 apps that police say could be dangerous for children. (Source:Bulloch County Sheriff’s Office’ Facebook)

Here are the 14 apps police say parents need to be aware of:

SNAPCHAT: allows users to take pictures and videos that disappear with new features like ‘stories’ that allow users to view content for 24 hours and see your location.

KIK: allows anyone to direct message instead of text messaging and gives unlimited access to anyone, anytime.

YELLOW: allows teens to flirt with one other similar to Tinder.

HOLLA: video chat app that allows users to meet through their phones across the world in seconds.

OMEGLE: allows users to chat for free and encourages anonymous chatting with strangers.

BUMBLE: similar to Tinder, a dating app that requires women to make first contact, though kids are known to create fake accounts and falsify their age.

WISHBONE: allows users to compare photos to each other and rate one another on a scale.

CALCULATOR%: secret app that allows users to hide photos, videos, files and browser history.

ASK.FM: notorious for cyberbullying, this app encourages to anonymously message others to ask questions.

WHISPER: anonymous social media app that allows users to share secrets with others and can share users’ locations so they can meet.

BURNBOOK: allows users to post anonymous rumors through text, audio and pictures.

HOT OR NOT: allows users to rate profiles and find people in their area and chat.

LIVE.ME: live streaming app that uses geolocation to share videos so users can see the broadcaster’s location.

INSTAGRAM: one of the most popular apps among children, kids are known to use this app for fake accounts and to text since the conversation is deleted when someone leaves the chat.

These are only examples of potentially dangerous apps, and parents should monitor all apps and note if they offer messaging features.

[“source=katv”]