YouTube Studio: better insights or a work in progress?

Will YouTube Studio’s new metrics be better for marketers?

In June of last year, YouTube announced that Creator Studio was about to change. A beta version named YouTube Studio was undergoing testing with hundreds of thousands of users – or should I say ‘creators’.

After nine months of nurturing their new baby, YouTube Studio was unveiled last week. Promises of efficiency, empowerment and increased joy, packaged with new features, metrics and insight. The increased data commitment has been played-up by YouTube.

But did the much anticipated promises deliver? Well, sort of.

YouTube Studio features include three new metrics: Impressions; Impressions Click-Through Rate; Unique Viewers. YouTube says these will give us better understanding of video performance with the aim of helping us produce more impactful video.

What’s an Impression? It’s when a viewer sees one of your video thumbnails; Impressions tell us the potential reach of our videos. It’s an ‘opportunity to view’.

What’s Impressions Click-Through Rate? Simply put, it’s the percentage of Impressions that turned into a video view.

What’s a Unique View? Well, to quote YouTube, it shows us “the estimated number of different people who watch our videos over a period of time.”

And there lies one of my issues. Data should not be estimated. We should be able to know the difference between a unique view and a repeat view. Why is YouTube estimating metrics? As for the ‘opportunity to view’ this just feels like a return to a time when we couldn’t accurately measure irrefutable data. perhaps it’s just me, as I’ve always hated fluffy measurements. In my PR and creative agency days I was forced to peddle PRVs and ‘Opportunities to See’. I hated both.

YouTube’s intent of delivering better insight and metrics should be applauded. It’s a key facet of success for other social media channels and absolutely is the direction they should be taking their Studio platform. Data that helps to evolve the production quality and impact of our videos is welcomed. I just can’t help but feel like this is a work in progress, rather than a refined proposition that’s ready to roll.

I’ll explain why: YouTube tell us that if we’re seeing a low percentage of Impressions convert to Impressions Click-Through Rate, then our thumbnail and title require work. That may be correct in some cases, but we can’t ignore how busy some pages are with thumbnails. Watch a video through to completion and then see how many thumb nails are served to you. It’s busy. Undoubtedly, Impressions will be recorded when users haven’t seen our thumbnails. To be fair though, the same criticism could be made of other social media channels.

Clearly, the Impressions Click-Through Rate is a useful metric. Being able to asses video performance will be insightful. I’m just not sure we needed the Impressions metric.

Now for the good news: we’re excited about YouTube Studio Dashboard – the single view of your data, insights and news. We’ll see three pieces of insight here:

Video Snapshot: A snapshot of our latest video performance, versus past videos – over the same period of time. Quickly, we’ll be able to ascertain if we’ve a production that is resonating, or if refinements are required. This should help us do more of what works, and learn from what isn’t.

Personalised Recommendations: YouTube says this will surface Creator Academy content based on our specific needs. Over time, we’ll also see insight into why certain videos perform better than others. Again, this will help with refinement and development.

News: Dynamic news and community information that is served to us. Meaning we don’t have to discover news, it finds us.

We expect Video Snapshot and Personalised Recommendations to be a real hit with users and the single view definitely receives a thumbs up. It’s just a shame we can’t be as positive about the new data metrics.

Data is resolute. The challenge with data is that it’s sometimes unstructured, requiring a framework to organise and help make the unstructured, structured. Data isn’t, and should never be estimated.

There is no denying that YouTube is onto something with their direction for YouTube Studio. In its current state though, it should be in production, rather than distributed for release. After nine-months of testing, you have to ask who was testing the platform, and why haven’t these basic flaws been flagged sooner?

As my old school tutor would say: “a good effort, but work still to be done!”

[“Source-thedrum”]

Providing CMOs Insights Across All Online Marketplaces: Jumpshot’s New “Insights” Product Now Enables Brands to Benchmark Against Competitors

Image result for New analytics tool reports consumers make over 50 percent of their online retail purchases on e-commerce sites like Amazon and Walmart.com

SAN FRANCISCOMarch 21, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Jumpshot, the only company that unlocks walled-garden data, today announced the company has broadened its data offering to enable marketing professionals who manage brands to benchmark against competitors by understanding purchase behavior, all the way down to the brand and category level. From search engines and online marketplaces to competitive websites, the new solution, called “Insights,” allows marketers to map purchasing behavior online identifying their path to buy even within walled gardens.

Some examples of how this product is applied:

  • While overall purchases for Nintendo products were down across all online retailers in February by about 20 percent year-over-year, Target.com saw an 80 percent year-over-year growth for these products.
  • Though Amazon saw a 30 percent growth in pet supply purchases year-over-year, purchases on Chewy.com more than doubled from the year prior.

“Consumers make over 50 percent of their online retail purchases on sites like Amazon and Walmart.com, and that number is continuing to grow,” said Deren Baker, CEO of Jumpshot. “Our clients have increasingly used Jumpshot to better understand their target customers’ purchasing behavior, wherever they go online, and now we’re taking that a step further – allowing brands to also get insights into how their competitor’s products are purchased.”

Jumpshot’s Insights solution enables marketers to:

  • Benchmark your brand against competitors. Understand how and where you’re losing out in the purchase cycle to the competition. Compare your performance to competitors — by domain, brand or category — at every step of the funnel on any site to pinpoint strengths and weaknesses. This includes referral sources, keyword search and upstream analytics.
  • Improve your brand conversion funnels everywhere. Analyze each step of the path to purchase across retail, travel, and other types of websites. From visit to conversion, see where users drop off, where they get stuck, and how long they take to convert on all leading marketplaces.
  • Understand cross-visitation behaviors. With insight into consumer purchasing behaviors throughout the entire web, marketers can understand where and why their customers are buying if not on their own site. Pulling back and looking at cross-site visitations by category can reveal an even broader picture that offers meaningful insights across an entire vertical.

About Jumpshot:
Jumpshot delivers digital intelligence from within the Internet’s most valuable walled gardens. The company’s real-time, global panel of 100 million devices tracks five billion actions a day to deliver insights into online behavior from every consumer action. Jumpshot works with customers including Condé Nast, Kantar, TripAdvisor, Moz, SEMrush, IRi, and GFK, among others. Learn more about Jumpshot at www.jumpshot.com.

[“Source-prnewswire”]

Taylor prepared for scrutiny of World Cup return

Image result for Taylor prepared for scrutiny of World Cup return

Taylor optimistic after challenging year

Sarah Taylor has declared that she is “back, and ready to face the World Cup and the scrutiny that professional sport brings,” after taking a year-long break from the game to combat an anxiety condition.

Taylor, who is widely recognised as one of the most naturally talented female cricketers of her generation, took an indefinite break from cricket in the aftermath of last year’s World T20 in India. However, she was last week included in England’s 15-strong squad for the Women’s World Cup, which gets underway in just under a month’s time.

Her inclusion followed a successful reintegration into the England set-up during a recent training camp in the UAE, where she took the field in a practice match against Ireland, scoring 26 not out in the second of three warm-up wins.

“It’s been a tough 12 months and lots has been learned in that time,” Taylor said in an interview arranged by the ECB. “In terms of where I am with my cricket, I’m incredibly comfortable to be back playing and the girls have been absolutely brilliant. It’s just nice to be back around them and the fact that the World Cup is at home as well makes it extra special. To be back in time for the World Cup has been a hard journey but very worth it so far.”

Prior to her diagnosis, Taylor’s condition was so acute at times that she found herself running off the field of play to be sick, while she also struggled with day-to-day issues such as taking public transport. A course of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) helped her to overcome many of the most debilitating traits of her illness, although she does accept that the pressures and scrutiny of a home World Cup campaign will bring a whole new challenge.

“I don’t think we can shy away from the fact that in a World Cup there will be pressure,” she said. “Through what I’ve dealt with over the last 12 months I feel like I’m probably mentally strong enough to deal with those pressures. All I want to do is help someone else get through it, so I don’t think I’m any different to anyone else.

“To be honest, when I took that break I didn’t look too far ahead. I couldn’t. I was always told to not look too far in the future, to take it day by day and as it comes. Literally getting out of bed was the highlight of a day and then accept that doing something brilliant might mean walking outside, that was a tick in the box.

Sarah Taylor has been absent from England duty for the past year Stephen Pond / © Getty Images

“To look towards the World Cup never even got into my head, it was never something I was striving for at the time, then all of a sudden I found myself wanting to train again and, like I said before, it actually benefitted my day-to-day learnings and my anxiety through that. Next thing I knew I was on a plane going to Abu Dhabi and that was a very last-minute decision.

Looking ahead to the World Cup itself, Taylor Is in no doubt about the team’s overall aim for the tournament. “Ultimately you want to win the tournament, don’t you?” she said. “But for me it’s literally just a case of day-by-day assessing where I am – anxiety-wise, cricket-wise, everything in my head. If not, what can we do to help me get through a training session, a game, everything like that.

“My success, from a very personal point of view, is obviously to perform and be consistent in my performances but flip that to the mental side of things and it’s about getting through the tour unscathed. I’m realistic that there probably will be some bumps but, actually, if I get through it I should look back and be completely proud of myself for doing it. I’m proud that I’ve even put myself out there to do it. I want to win as much as the next person – and I’m hoping that there’ll be success with my own mental health and we can see a trophy at the same time.”

Google Assistant on Pixel Phones Could Soon Get Keyboard Input

Google Assistant on Pixel Phones Could Soon Get Keyboard InputGoogle Assistant on Pixel Phones Could Soon Get Keyboard Input
HIGHLIGHTS
The keyboard based input was discovered in a teardown of Google app APK
A new keyboard icon will appear on the Google Assistant screen
There are no details when this feature will roll out
With Google Assistant, the Internet giant Google took AI-based digital assistance to another level. Last year, Google released versions of Google Assistant on three different products – the Pixel smartphones, Google Allo, and Google Home. Until now, the only way to interact with the Assistant outside the Allo app has been to use voice, but that may soon change.

In its teardown session of APK file for a new beta version of Google app for Android, Android Police discovered that the keyboard-based input could be coming to the Google Assistant for the Pixel and Pixel XL. Presently, you can only communicate with Google Assistant through voice on Pixel smartphones. When this keyboard input feature finally arrives, a keyboard icon will start showing up while you interact with Google Assistant, and tapping on it will allow you to type your query. However, it still remains to be seen if there would be a difference between the sort of replies you get from Google Assistant with and without the keyboard input, though we’d be surprised if there was any difference.

The APK file teardown also revealed Assistant could add support for Android Wear, but it’s still not clear if this would only be for wearables paired with Pixel smartphones, or a wider range of phones. In addition, there’s another feature that has been discovered in the teardown. It’s a bare mention of ‘search gestures’ in the APK file, which suggests Google might be testing some gesture input feature in the Pixel launcher or Google Now launcher.
It’s not clear when these features will ship to all users.

This week at the CES trade show, Google said that Assistant will now be making its way to supported Android TV devices in the US. Google’s artificial intelligence-based digital assistant will be released for Nvidia’s new Shield, as well as other Android TVs running on Android 6.0 Marshmallow or higher, which includes AirTV Player, Sharp Aquos, Sony Bravia, and Xiaomi Mi Box.

For the latest coverage from the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, visit our CES 2017 hub.
Tags: Google Assistant, Google, Artificial Intelligence, Digital Assistants, Apps, Android

[“source-smallbiztrends”]