Waitrose and M&S sign up to ‘ghost gear’ fisheries initiative

fishing regulations

Some 640,000 tonnes of discarded fishing gear is added to oceans every year

Waitrose and M&S have joined Sainsbury’s and Morrisons in signing up to World Animal Protection’s Global Ghost Gear Initiative.

The campaign aims to tackle the growing problem of lost, abandoned or discarded fishing gear – with some 640,000 tonnes added to oceans every year. The announcement coincided with this year’s World Oceans Day on 8 June.

As part of its commitment, M&S would invest in a host of initiatives designed to promote best practice to fight lost gear in its fisheries and improve the reporting, recovery and recycling of lost gear, said a World Animal Protection spokeswoman.

The charity highlighted the crucial role of retailers in tackling the issue of ghost gear by looking at their seafood supply chains and taking measures to reduce pollution. It added it was also in discussions with Tesco about joining its campaign.

Seafood companies urged to improve approach to ‘ghost gear’

“Our customers care about reducing plastic pollution and the health of our oceans. That’s why we’re committed to responsible sourcing, it’s why we’re supporting the Responsible Fishing Scheme and why we’ve joined the GGGI,” said Hannah Macintyre, fisheries and aquaculture manager at M&S.

“As well as funding GGGI’s vital work, we will be working with our suppliers to transform their approach managing their fishing gear and ensuring best practice when it comes to gear marking, disposing of marine litter, recycling old gear and reporting lost kit.”

Head of sustainability and responsible sourcing at Waitrose, Tor Harris, added: “Bringing organisations together to solve the issue of abandoned fishing equipment can only be a good thing for marine life. Responsible sourcing is a top priority for us so this is a positive step for the environment and the future of sustainable fishing.”

Ghost gear affected more than 800 species of marine life, according to a report released in March by World Animal Protection. It estimated between 5%-30% of the decline in some fish stocks was caused by the issue.

Discarded nets, pots and lines represented more than 70% of all the floating macroplastics in the ocean and cause the deaths of more than 100,000 whales, dolphins, seals and turtles every year through entanglement, the report said.

[“Source-thegrocer”]

Villains snatch Iron Man suit and more Marvel gear

Image result for Villains snatch Iron Man suit and more Marvel gear

Robert Downey Jr. as Iron Man in “Iron Man 2”©Paramount/Courtesy Everett Col

A geek crime wave has hit Hollywood — as villains are pilfering pricey Marvel memorabilia.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, robbers have stolen fanboy treasures including an Iron Man suit reportedly valued at $325,000, a shield from “Captain America” and a set of claws from “Logan.”

Former execs at Lucasfilm and Marvel have also been robbed, as sales of such collectibles have reached $400 million per year.

Legitimate sales are robust.

One LA auction house CEO told the magazine, “I have hedge funds looking to diversify into this market.”

The crooks have taken notice, too.

Muddying the market further, fraud can be rampant with fewer safeguards in place than in the fine-art world, and overly sentimental collectors often don’t care about the quality of the artifacts.

“Veep” exec producer David Mandel, a major collector of “Star Wars” stuff says of wealthy buyers: “If [these individuals] were buying a company, they’d go up and down over it a million times and not take anyone’s word for it — they’d do due diligence. But yet people buy stuff all the time and merrily go, ‘I don’t care.’ ”

One LAPD detective who specializes in fine-art theft says, “It’s a difficult field to investigate.”

Some costume pros have started weaving DNA into the garments for tracking purposes.

A new look for gear milling – Iscar

Technology and its products are often causative: A technology might be applied to develop more effective and intelligent products, which in turn can play an important role in advancing that technology.

This interrelationship may be observed in metalworking. Over the last few years, leading-edge technology has resulted in multitasking machine tools and machining centers with impressive working possibilities. At the same time, this progress in machine tool engineering is significantly changing metal cutting technology.

The advanced multifunctional machine tools increasingly widen the range of machining operations that can be performed. Technological processes developed for these machines are oriented to maximise machining operation for one-setup manufacturing, creating a new source for more accurate and productive manufacturing. Milling gears and splines is one of the operations suitable for performing on the new machines.

ModuGear

Traditionally, gear (and spline) making is a complicated process that involves milling, chamfering, grinding and other operations. With batch manufacturing, the majority is made on specific machines like gear hobbing, gear shaving, gear grinding and so on. Developments in technology have changed the limits of hardness for cutting and considerably increased operational accuracy. This in turn has reduced abrasive machining in gear making while decreasing rough cutting. The modern multifunctional machines, which meet the requirements of one-set-up manufacturing, have proved to be perfect for various gear making operations.

These new machines require appropriate tooling and cutting tools manufacturers should prepare their response accordingly, which is why producers of general purpose rotating cutting tools are reconsidering the role of gear-milling cutters in their programme for standard product lines.

Iscar, one of the leaders in the cutting tool industry, is embodying this trend with a three-point programme for form gear making tools:

• Milling cutters carrying indexable inserts
• Milling cutters with replaceable cutting heads based on the T-Slot concept
• Milling cutters with replaceable Multi-Master cutting heads

ModuGear, the family of indexable gear milling cutters reflects a conventional design approach, comprising disk-type tools with tangentially clamped LNET inserts. The tangential clamping principle provides an extremely rigid and durable cutter structure that results in stable and precise enough machining tooth or spline profiles. Its principal application is producing involute gears of relatively low accuracy and rough gear-milling operations that feature a 1mm to 1.75mm gear module range.

T-Gear

The cutters with replaceable heads have two significant advantages compared with gear milling tools carrying indexable inserts. They offer better precision and allow the design of gear-milling cutters that are small in diameter but feature quite a large number of teeth. The replaceable heads are mounted in bodies (shanks), which are standard-line products suitable not only for the gear-milling heads but also for other types of head (for milling slots and grooves, for example). This enables customers to increase operating efficiency of the versatile shanks and to reduce tool stock, providing added value.

The replaceable solid carbide heads of the T-Gear SD D32-M…-SP15 family are mounted in standard T-Slot SD-SP15 cylindrical shanks and transform the latter into 32mm diameter gear milling cutters. The precise profile of the cutters’ teeth and the accurate and reliable SP-connection between the shank and the head define its range of use: Milling involute gears featuring a 1mm to 2mm module.

Both types of milling cutters (those with indexable inserts and those with replaceable heads) meet the requirements of standard DIN 3972, basic profile II.

There are two types of Multi-Master spline and gear making solid carbide heads. The first type is represented by the MM SS heads that were specially designed for milling involute spline shafts, specified by DIN 5480 and ANSI B92.1 standards. These heads are intended for 1mm, 1.25mm, 1.5mm and 3mm module (DIN 5480) and 8mm, 10mm, 12mm and 24mm diametral pitch (ANSI B92.1).

The heads of the second type, MM SG, are used in milling spur gears in accordance with DIN 3972 (module 1mm to 1.75mm) and ANSI B6.1 (diametral pitch 15mm to 24mm) standards.

The main application field for Multi-Master heads is the efficient production of small to medium batches of spline and spur gears in various industrial branches.

The world of gears is very rich and multiform, embracing a wide variety of external and internal gears like spur, helical, bevel, hypoid, and more. Manufacturing these gears encompasses an entire, dynamic industrial sector with its own methods, equipment and tooling. The introduction of multitasking machines in gear milling as a serious alternative to a dedicated machine represents a new challenge to this sector and producers of commonly used cutting tools should be ready for this significant change. Iscar meets this challenge while maintaining the requisite high standards demanded by end users.

[“Source-“metalworkingnews]

Samsung Gear Sport 2: what we want to see

We’re not sure whether we’ll get a Gear Sport 2 or a Gear S4 next from Samsung, but one of them is probably in the works, and we’re starting to hear about what it might feature.

You’ll find all that below, along with thoughts on the likely release date and price, and we’ll keep this article updated as we hear more.

But while we wait for the leaks and rumors to properly start rolling in we’ve also come up with a wish list of what we want from the Samsung Gear Sport 2, as the previous Gear Sport is a capable but overly familiar wearable, so we’re hoping for some big changes for the next model.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? Samsung’s next smartwatch
  • When is it out? Probably sometime in 2018
  • What will it cost? Likely upwards of $299 / £299 / AU$499

Samsung Gear Sport 2 release date and price

There aren’t any release date rumors yet, but with the Samsung Gear Sportbeing announced in August 2017 (before hitting stores in October) there’s a fair chance we’ll see the Samsung Gear Sport 2 in or around August 2018.

Samsung also launched the Gear S3 and Gear S2 in August of previous years, so it’s very likely we’ll get some kind of smartwatch this August, though whether it will be called the Gear Sport 2, Gear S4 or something else entirely is currently unknown.

As for the price, that will probably be at least as high as the Gear Sport, which launched for $299 / £299 / AU$499.

Samsung Gear Sport 2 news and leaks

While we haven’t seen any news or rumors that mention the Gear Sport 2 by name, we have seen a handful of Samsung smartwatch patents, so it’s possible that some of their features will be included in the Gear Sport 2.

One of them talks about having a battery built into the strap, which could provide extra life to the watch or could simply replace the battery that would otherwise be built into the watch body, leaving extra room there for new features.

Another details a blood pressure monitor, which could use a light source and a light receiver to monitor your bloodstream, somewhat similarly to how heart rate monitors work.

The Gear Sport 2 might make better use of its bezel. Credit: Patently Mobile

Patently Mobile has also shared a patent (pictured above) which talks about a screen built into the bezel of the watch, which could potentially tell you things like the date and the weather, leaving the main display free for other functions.

And another patent, this time spotted by 3Dnews, shows a watch that strangely has a camera built into the middle of the screen.

The camera sports optical zoom and while it leaves you with less screen, that could be made up for by the strap, which also has a screen on it, shown in the patent as offering shortcuts to apps and functions.

Could the Gear Sport 2 have a camera in the screen? Credit: 3DNews

We wouldn’t count on any of these features making their way to the Gear Sport 2, especially as many seem ambitious or impractical, but anything’s possible.

What we want to see

We don’t know much about the Samsung Gear Sport 2 yet, but we have plenty of ideas for what we want from it.

1. Better exercise tracking

Although the Gear Sport can track some things well, we found in our review that it had real issues tracking certain exercises, such as star jumps and lunges.

Not only that, but it doesn’t provide training plans, so for example you have to manually set how many of each exercise you want to do each day, rather than the wearable gradually increasing the number over time on its own.

We want to see some serious improvements for the Gear Sport 2. At the very least we want it to accurately track all the exercises that it claims to be able to, but ideally we also want it to push us to do more.

2. More accurate heart rate monitoring

Hopefully the Gear Sport 2’s heart rate monitor will be more accurate

Although the Gear Sport has a heart rate monitor it’s really not a very good one and it gets even less accurate in cold weather, so we’d like to see some major improvements here. Given that the Gear S3 also has a poor heart rate monitor though we’re not optimistic that the Gear Sport 2’s will be much better.

3. Improved GPS

Although not as bad as the heart rate monitor, the GPS performance of the Gear Sport also isn’t always great, proving slightly erratic in our review.

Given that GPS is likely to be a key feature for many buyers it really needs to perform well. Hopefully it will do for the next model.

4. Better battery life

The Gear Sport is actually a downgrade from the Gear S3 when it comes to battery life, offering around two and a half days where its predecessor offered up to four.

That’s still not awful, but it’s disappointing, especially when the watch looks to track your sleep as well – something you won’t be able to do so much if you’re regularly having to plug it in at night, so for the Gear Sport 2 we want to at least see a return to the life of the Gear S3.

5. A slicker strap

Putting a watch on should be easier than it is with the Gear Sport

Not a big deal, perhaps, but the Gear Sport’s strap can be awkward to get through the holding loops, and what with the regular charges needed it is a watch you’ll be taking on and off quite a lot, so we hope that for the Gear Sport 2 Samsung gives the strap some thought, and makes it faster and less fiddly to put on.

6. More apps

While the Gear Sport has some apps, including notable ones like Spotify and Swim.com, there isn’t a huge selection overall, even compared to other smartwatch platforms like Android Wear and watchOS.

This is likely a side-effect of the Gear Sport using Samsung’s Tizen – an operating system which is less popular than rivals. We doubt Samsung will ditch Tizen for the Gear Sport 2, but hopefully it will convince some more big names to support the platform.

7. A bigger screen

The Samsung Gear Sport has a decent quality Super AMOLED screen, but at 1.2 inches it’s quite small, and a reduction in size from the 1.3-inch display on the Gear S3.

We don’t want a massive screen on our wrists, but a return to the 1.3-inch displays of old could be desirable, as that small difference makes it slightly easier to interact with and means you can see more on your wrist at once.

  • These are the best smartwatches available right now

Related product: Samsung Gear Sport

Our Verdict:

Samsung’s Gear Sport does seem like a limited upgrade, but new features including support for Spotify offline and swim tracking means this could be a great new watch for very particular sport lovers.

 FOR

  • Offline Spotify support
  • Great design
 AGAINST

  • Limited upgrade
  • Some strange straps

[“Source-techradar”]