Artisans from 17 districts to come up with creative exhibits for three-day art fair

Artisans from 17 districts to come up with creative exhibits for three-day art fair

Kolkata: Around 60 artists, crafts persons and weavers from 17 districts of Bengal will take part in a three-day fair titled Lokshilpa O Karukriti mela, which will start from May 7.

It may be mentioned that after coming to power in 2011, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee took up schemes to help the artisans. Their products are being exported through Biswa Bangla shops.

Around 2 lakh folk artists are receiving monthly stipend and are given programmes at cultural shows organised by different state government departments.

Melas are held throughout the year where the artisans can go and sell their products. Many Patchitris are invited to attend fairs held in European and other countries.

People from foreign countries are found to attend the melas that are held in different parts of Bengal.

The three-day fair will be inaugurated by Alokananda Roy while Sabyasachi Basu Ray Chaudhuri, vice chancellor of Rabindra Bharati University (RBU), will preside over the function. The mela will be organised by the West Bengal State Akademi of Dance Drama Music and Visual Arts of RBU.

Artisans from West Midnapore district will bring patachitras, mats, and decorative items made with buffalo horns and lac items from East Midnapore.

Clay dolls from south 24-Parganas and batik products from Birbhum and Howrah districts will be displayed at the mela. Wood carvings from Bardhaman district, dokra ornaments, shola handicrafts and kantha-stitch items from Birbhum district and traditional clay models from Nadia district will also be on display.

The famous Baluchari sarees from Bankura district, Chhau dance masks from Purulia district and bamboo handicrafts from Malda district, jute crafts from Murshidabad district, wooden masks and dhokra items from South Dinajpur district, Polia clay models from North Dinajpur district and traditional Mech handicrafts from Alipurduar district will be brought at the mela.

Shitalpatis from Cooch Behar, traditional Lepcha handicrafts from Kalimpong and wood carvings from Darjeeling district will be on display. The mela will remain open from 8am to 8pm.

[“source=millenniumpost”]

‘The Division 2’ Restarts Its ‘PvE Dark Zone’ Debate With The Arrival Of 515 Gear

The Division 2

I thought we would be having this conversation again at some point after The Division 2’s launch, but I didn’t think it would be this soon, or for this reason.

Massive recently introduced 515 Gearscore gear, over the current cap of 500, to drop in the Dark Zone. While 515 gear will join it when the raid arrives, many players are upset that they are being forced to travel to the DZ as the only place to farm this gear as it’s something that doesn’t interest them, at least not in its current form.

This has resparked a very old debate, one from the early days of The Division 1, where there’s an idea that there should be a PvE version of the Dark Zone free from Rogues and gank squads, so people can explore and farm these areas without being bothered by other players when they have no interest in PvP.

The counterpoint to this is that removing PvP and Rogue would destroy the entire concept of the mode, and people just need to “get good” if they want to survive in what is supposed to be the most harrowing zone on the map. This is roughly the position that Massive has taken as well, as despite all the requests for a PvE Dark Zone in The Division 1, that never happened.

The Division 2

The Division 2

MASSIVE

Instead, what we saw was kind of alternative for PvP-focused players rather than the thing PvE players wanted. That’s how we have Conflict, a dedicated PvP experience which improves PvP play for those who were tired of trying to kill enemies in the Dark Zone who didn’t want to fight at all and just wanted to run and be left alone. But the PvPvE element of the Dark Zone remains, and now some people are getting annoyed by it once more.

It may not surprise you to learn that I am on the side of “yes, the Dark Zone would benefit from a PvE option.” I don’t think you need to remove the PvPvE mode that currently exists for the game. Those that like that aspect can still play it, but offering a PvE version has too many upsides to ignore. I know plenty of players that have not even done so much as the intro quest for the Dark Zone because they remembered how much they disliked it in The Division 1. I did the intro quest and got up to level 10 or 15 or so in the DZ, but I haven’t been back since for the same reasons. I have no real interest in fighting other players, be it well-geared adversaries or easily killable noobs. I have no interest in farming for loot only to end up losing it because of ganks or other mishaps. And so I farm activities that are more reliable, won’t pit me against other players and don’t have the risk of losing anything. But I would love to explore an additional 25-30% of the map in the Dark Zone areas with a PvE version of the DZ, because otherwise it’s just wasted space to me. This was also true of the first game where the DZ was even larger and kept getting larger with future updates.

There is always a hardcore contingent of Dark Zone players who push back on all this, but I am genuinely unsure of what they’d lose if PvE was just an option for the Dark Zone. Players who like the current Dark Zone could still queue up for that version. To me, this is more about denying players zones and loot they haven’t “earned” because they can’t stand the heat of the “real” Dark Zone which is stupid gatekeeping I don’t respect or appreciate.

The Division 2

The Division 2

MASSIVE

I have no way of checking this, so far as I can tell, but I am willing to bet that as vocal as the hardcore Dark Zone community is, the DZ has a fraction of the players of the larger PvE world, and probably only a fraction of those actively want to be there and would care if there was a PvP option. I think there’s a reason that Massive put 515 gear in the Dark Zone, because they’re trying to lure people to actually play it. Right now, tons and tons of people are avoiding it completely because it’s much easier to queue up for missions or bounties or strongholds with a more straightforward path to loot, working with other players rather than against them. And if they do want to fight other people? That’s what Conflict is for, and that too comes with no risk of surprise attacks and lost loot.

The Dark Zone has always been Massive’s pet project, the concept that was supposed to make The Division stand out compared to its competition. And yet it has always remained my least favorite aspect of the game, and that has not changed in the sequel. If we didn’t see a PvE Dark Zone in all the years of The Division 1 doubt we’ll see one now, but I think it’s a bad path forward for Massive to try and simply bribe people to play the DZ when clearly something is gone wrong if they have to do that in the first place.

[“source=forbes”]

Creativity for change: how these artists remind us that progress must come with a purpose

Kochi-Muziris Biennale

The fourth edition of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale features creative works by 95 artists in 10 locations around the heritage Fort Kochi district, as well as nine satellite venues. See Part Iand Part II of our photo essays, as well as our coverage of the Bangkok Biennale.

From politics to nature, the art works in this photo essay point a way to hope in their own creative manner. For example, some artists go beyond paints and sculptures to show how ropes (Mrinalini Mukherjee) and seashells (Julie Gough) can be used in installations.

Crushed dreams, the sorrow of conflict, and displacement after natural calamities leave deep scars on society (Rula Halawani, Srinagar Biennale, Chittoprasad Bhattachary). Social divides continue to thrive even after the end of the colonial era (BV Suresh). Rising corruption plagues emerging economies, holding back their right to progress. Reckless urban and rural development wreak havoc on habitat and nature.

It takes sensitisation and a demand for justice to dissect and tackle social-political problems. The artists in this photo essay go beyond images of doom and gloom to show that creative solutions can indeed be found, and in a sustainable manner. They raise awareness about the importance of human rights, dignity, identity, inclusion and expression (Zanelle Muholi; the Braille edition of the Biennale brochure).

“Success for an artist comes from the happiness of making a connect with the audience. It comes from sensitising them to the loss of others, and helping them be grateful for what they have,” said painter-photographer Manisha Gera Baswani, in a chat with YourStory.

Her exhibit, titled Postcards from Home, features photographs of Indian and Pakistani artists whose parents moved across the border during partition. Those who have overcome their sense of loss and displacement in a dignified manner are a source of inspiration for the next generation, she explains.

She advises aspiring artists to listen to their heart, and have faith that the impact of their work will eventually emerge. This is particularly important in a time of international tension and domestic conflict, Manisha urges.

Now, what have you done today to pause and take stock of the world around us, and do your bit to create a better place for us all?

[“source=yourstory”]

‘Overwatch’ League Shop Goes Live With Gear From All 20 Leagues

The official “Overwatch” League Shop is now live for users in the United States, with free shipping available on all orders until Feb. 1.

The “Overwatch” league Shop features a collection of jerseys, shirts, hats, and more for all 20 “Overwatch” League franchises, as well as merchandise for the league itself. The shop also includes gear for the eight expansion franchises: the Atlanta Reign, Chengdu Hunters, Guangzhou Charge, Hangzhou Spark, Paris Eternal, Toronto Defiant, Vancouver Titans, and Washington Justice. Storefronts in other regions, including Europe, will launch later this year.

Fanatics has also released a new Profile Collection product line for each team. The New Profile Collection gear and new product lines will be unveiled throughout the 2019 season.

The Overwatch League unveiled the multi-year deal with licensed sports merchandiser Fanatics last year. The deal has Fanatics handle all fan gear sold across retail and wholesale channels worldwide via a dedicated website for Overwatch League gear.

“As we’ve gone around building out the Overwatch League, we’ve continued to figure out how we can find the right partner to take our business and build the Overwatch League,” Brandon Snow, chief revenue officer for Activision Blizzard eSport leagues, told Variety at the time. “One of the big areas to build the brands of these teams and service fans is with products and merchandise.”

The “Overwatch” League second season kicks off on Feb. 14.

[“source=variety”]