Aadhaar not mandatory for any national entrance exam, for now

The Supreme Court has directed the CBSE to upload the information regarding Aadhaar number on their website. Photo: HT

The Supreme Court has directed the CBSE to upload the information regarding Aadhaar number on their website. Photo: HT

New Delhi: The Supreme Court on Wednesday said unique identification number Aadhaar cannot be made mandatory for any national entrance examination for now.

The interim order was passed by a bench headed by Chief Justice Dipak Misra in a challenge to making the 12-digit number mandatory for National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET) 2018 for admission to medical courses.

The court said other forms of identification such as voter ID, passport or ration card can be used to register for or appear in the coming NEET. The last date to submit applications for NEET conducted by the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) is 9 March.

This means even a candidate who has Aadhaar is not required to produce it for appearing in national entrance tests like NEET.

Apart from sparing NEET candidates from mandatorily furnishing Aadhaar, the interim order also prohibits CBSE, Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and the University Grants Commission (UGC) from making the unique number mandatory for examinations like Joint Entrance Exam (JEE-Main) and National Eligibility Test (NET) and the Common Admission Test held by Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs).

The court also directed the centre to inform CBSE to follow the order and upload it on its website so that students are better informed. Currently, CBSE is the test delivery partner for most national entrance tests, including JEE-Main, NEET, UGC-NET and Central Teacher Eligibility Test.

Earlier this year, CBSE had issued notifications making Aadhaar must for appearing in several national entrance tests.

“The use of Aadhaar for applicants of UGC-NET(July) 2018 will result in accuracy of applicants’ details. This will also help ascertain identities of applicants at the examination centres in a convenient and hassle-free manner,” CBSE had said in one of its notifications dated 23 February, justifying the use of Aadhaar.

However, attorney general K.K. Venugopal told the court that the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) has not authorized CBSE to make Aadhaar mandatory for students to enrol for NEET.

A Constitution bench comprising Chief Justice Misra and justices D.Y. Chandrachud, A.K. Sikri, A.M. Khanwilkar and Ashok Bhushan is hearing the case against the Constitutional validity of Aadhaar.

The order was passed on an appeal by one Abidali Yusufbhai Patel, who had specifically challenged Aadhaar being made must for filling up NEET enrolment forms. The matter was mentioned in the morning and was taken up for hearing in the afternoon, along with the main challenge to Aadhaar that is being heard by the Constitution bench.

Patel had challenged a 27 February order passed by the Gujarat high court, which refused to grant interim relief to students seeking exemption from submitting Aadhaar while appearing for JEE(Main), 2018 (JEE) and NEET.

During the course of arguments, a challenge to Aadhaar being passed as a money bill was raised by lawyer and former finance minister P. Chidambaram, who carved out the distinction between a money and financial bill. Chidambaram is one of the lawyers representing the petitioners.

“A money bill cannot be introduced in Rajya Sabha. In this case, Rajya Sabha becomes only a recommending house. They have no legislative power but only recommendative power,” Chidambaram told the court.

A batch of petitions have been tagged by the Supreme Court to be heard by the Constitution bench. They challenge several aspects of Aadhaar, the 12-digit unique identity number that has become a bedrock of government welfare programmes, the tax administration network and online financial transactions, and the use/sharing of personal data collected by the UIDAI.

There are more than 1.2 billion Aadhaar holders in the country.

[“Source-livemint”]

What Not To Say During A Salary Negotiation

If you want things to go your way, don’t say any of this

Get the best offer possible during your salary negotiation

Preparation pays off, literally, when it comes to salary negotiations. Research about the market and company standards can only take you so far – you need to be able to pitch yourself too. There are some phrases people tend to use in these discussions that don’t really end up working in their favour – despite what they (or you) believe. Here are a few of them. Remember not to say any of this during your next salary negotiation.

1. ‘I’m getting married/moving house/etc’

Let us try to say this as politely as possible – no one cares. Your personal matters are just that – personal. And you can not expect them to influence any professional decisions made at that meeting. The best thing to do is avoid talking about your personal dilemmas, no matter how much they’re affecting you, and focus on the work you’re doing and it’s worth.

2. ‘I’m sorry but…’

Don’t apologise. We all tend to use the word quite liberally, especially when talking to superiors. But there is nothing to apologise for here – you’re talking about your remuneration, which is your right. Don’t feel embarrassed or uncomfortable about it. You’ve worked hard for it.

3. ‘I need/want… ‘

But do you really ‘need’ it? And if you want it, so what? We’re sure every person wants a higher salary. But what’s more important is – do they deserve it? Sometimes the answer to that is no. During your salary negotiations, instead of telling them what you want, tell them what you deserve – and why.

4. ‘I have another offer that is much higher’

Take it then? You don’t want your prospective employer to think you’re in it just for the money. If the other company is offering you more money, and that’s all that matters, you would have taken it anyway. So don’t play that card and try to keep the focus of the conversation on the offer you’re discussing.

5. ‘I haven’t had a raise in so long’

You need to put your point across, without sounding like you’re whining and saying this doesn’t help your case. Bringing their attention to the fact that you have not gotten a raise only makes them think that there has been no reason for you to get a raise.

6. ‘But others are getting paid more to do less work’

Again, trying to compare yourself to others won’t work, nor it is your place to do so. Talk about how much time and effort you have been putting in, irrespective of others – but as soon as you make it seem like a competition, you’re going to lose favour in the discussion. Also, it makes you sound like a gossip-monger.

7. ‘I want more…’

‘More’ is too vague for you to use in this discussion. ‘More’ can be 2% more than the original offer was. There is no room for ‘more’ in this negotiation. Talk about how much more you would like the offer to be and they might take you seriously.

[“Source-ndtv”]

Reliance JioMoney Could Well Be a Disruptor, but Not Just Yet

Reliance JioMoney Could Well Be a Disruptor, but Not Just YetReliance JioMoney Could Well Be a Disruptor, but Not Just Yet

HIGHLIGHTS

  • JioMoney is Reliance Jio’s digital wallet
  • You can use it to recharge your accounts or pay offline
  • Login issues plagued our usage over the whole week

Reliance Jio wants to empower 10 million merchants to make digital transactions. The JioMoney appwas supposed to roll out to merchants last week, while Jio users have of course been using it for recharges and P2P payments for a lot longer, ever since the test rollout started almost a year ago now.

At the announcement for Jio Money earlier this month, Reliance Industries Chairman Mukesh Ambani talked about how every Indian now has a digital money wallet linked to their bank account. He spoke about Aadhaar based micro-ATMs at Jio’s eKYC enabled stores. Ambani laid out a massive vision for JioMoney, one that could well disrupt the rapid development we’re seeing in the fintech world.

The ground reality is a little different though – we’ve been using the JioMoney app for a week now – or trying to anyway – and our finding is that much like JioCinema and JioMusic, the JioMoney experience is very much a work in progress at this point.

Both of those apps have been tweaked since we reviewed them, and some of the early problems have been resolved, while a few others still remain. A re-branding also involved a rethink of the UX, which was very welcome. Conceivably, it’s possible that Reliance Jio will put JioMoney through the same kind of process as well, because as of now on day one, or rather week one, there’s no doubt that this kind of re-imagining is required.

jio in app jio_in_app

First up, let’s talk about something basic – logging in. To log in, enter your Jio number and password, and then verify your date of birth. This worked a couple of times, and did not work on many other occasions. In short, simply logging in to JioMoney to start using the app is a frustrating challenge, as there are frequent “Error processing request” messages, which is not helped by the fact that – as a genuinely welcome security measure – you can only attempt to verify your account a set number of times per hour.

Once you actually get into the app, there are all the usual options – the design looks a little clunky right now, but that’s true for all of Jio’s apps during their early days, and like we mentioned earlier, there’s hope that this will eventually change. The app lets you send or request money, pay bills and recharges, pay at a shop, along with a section for coupons, and for giving to charity. The last of these is unusual but that notwithstanding, the offerings are pretty much in line with the industry. You should be able to use the app to pay your Jio bills as well, whenever that comes into effect.

Recharges are a smooth process, with little or no issue as long as you’re able to get into the app. You can recharge other prepaid phone connections, DTH connections, gas payments, and so on. You can transfer money to a bank account using IMPS by using its IFSC code and account number. You can use this to take your money out of Jio as well.

jio barcode jio_barcode

Pay at shop via the Reliance JioMoney app requires you to enter the seller’s phone number or scan a code, after which you enter your mPIN to authorise the transaction. This seems to be a workable way of doing this, but unlike other wallets, whose stickers now emblazon shop after shop, it’s very hard to know where you actually can use JioMoney. Although we were very hopeful that we’d have stories to share about using it in the real world, the sad fact is that all of our transactions – in between many logouts and request processing errors – took place online.

In contrast, we’ve used several other digital wallets throughout the week, to buy everyday items, pay for conveyance, and to grab a bite. A week is too short a time to expect Jio to be massively visible of course, but given Ambani’s pledge of reaching 10 million merchants very soon, it’s going to have to pick up the pace very quickly.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

How To Lead Creative People (When You’re Not A Creative Yourself)

Shutterstock

Creative people tend to be sensitive souls – some might even go so far as to say ‘highly strung’. They don’t always take criticism well, no matter how kindly it’s meant, and can perceive even the smallest piece of negative feedback as an unbridled assault on their competence.

In their work, many leaders who do not come from a creative background themselves have to learn how to motivate agency staff and freelancers. So how can they get these volatile ideas folk to produce truly outstanding work? Here are five top tips for encouraging the sparks of genius to fly:

    1. Praise us! If you want to keep getting great work out of creative people, the secret is not just to pay their invoice promptly at the end of the project (although that helps a lot, admittedly) but also to give them positive feedback if you’re happy with a job well done. You’re our client. We want to make you happy. If we were just in it for the money, we would have done something else instead – like law.
    1. Brief us properly. Sadly the place where most creative projects go wrong is right at the start – ie the part where you’re involved. If you don’t take the time to give us a proper, well-considered brief, either in writing or verbally, you’re effectively setting us loose to interpret what we think you want in the way we think is best. Unless you really are very open-minded about what you want, that’s a recipe for disaster. It’s a bit like saying to a builder: “Hey there, please can you build me a house” and just leaving them to get on with it.
    2. Be specific in your feedback. Saying something ‘doesn’t quite work for me but I don’t know why’ isn’t very helpful to a creative. If you want to get a better result, you need to be able to tell us why you don’t like a piece of work and what might make it better. Don’t be afraid to wrestle with a challenge and make your own input. Creative people value collaboration. In fact, the best results often come out of clients and creative teams working together constructively.
  1. Remember that we have feelings. You might not like the work we’ve sent you but unless it’s obviously sloppy – riddled with spelling mistakes, for example – the chances are that we’ve really labored over it and truly believe that we’ve done a good job for you. So before you embark on a long list of what’s wrong with a piece of work, try to highlight any parts of it that you do like or acknowledge where you may not have been clear on an aspect of the brief. Build a relationship with us – along with everyone else, we try harder for people we like.
  2. Be realistic. About everything. Don’t give a writer a strict word count and then ask them to make lots of points that could not conceivably be made effectively in such a small number of words. Don’t give a designer a day to turn around a complex piece of artwork that incorporates lots of charts. Finally, don’t expect to pay pittance and get outstanding work delivered ahead of deadline. You will just end up with a frustrated creative who produces suboptimal results.

[“Source-forbes”]