Maharashtra Bets Big on AI as Global Business Conclave Kicks Off

Maharashtra Bets Big on AI as Global Business Conclave Kicks Off

Maharashtra is betting big on Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning by setting up India’s first ever centre for research in AI and the state government is collaborating with the Wadhwani Foundation which is investing over 200 crores to set up the centre in Mumbai. The centre was inaugurated by the Prime Minister on Sunday evening. It will look at solutions for traffic management, agricultural distress and rural and urban healthcare, problems that the state has been unable to resolve.

It’s being described as Maharashtra’s leap of faith in the technology domain

and this centre will put Mumbai on India’s technology map, officials say. “This is in line with the vision of the Prime Minister and the Chief Minister in order to create a future ready environment for the state,” says Kaustubh Dhavse, Officer on Special Duty to Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis.

The effort the founders say will be to make the centre a hub for AI in India. Co-founder and former CEO of Information Technology company iGate says the time is just right.

“This would be the perfect time to take the power of AI and apply it to accelerating social development. Interestingly with all of this AI work being done all over the world all of it is being designed for commercial interests and very little is done being done to help people at the bottom of the pyramid and that is what our institute will focus on,” Sunil Wadhwani, Founder of Wadhwani Initiative for Sustainable Health (WISH Foundation) told NDTV.

The institute will be headed Dr. P Anandan, a renowned researcher in computer vision and artificial intelligence with a career spanning over 30 years in academia and industry. “AI is the cutting edge of high tec technology. Moreover, AI for social good is not being done anywhere. There is no institute anywhere in India or abroad whose primary focus is to develop AI technology and apply it to social good. So in that sense, Mumbai becomes a leader right away,” Dr. Anandan said.

The industry too believes that India can become a hub for AI…given its big data potential. Bob Lord, Chief Digital Officer at global technology giant, IBM says “That data will allow you to have different insights than not being able to monitor it all and allow us to make better decisions for our consumers, businesses and schools.”

“I think it’s really exciting and we would like to have more of it in our school and give more access to it so that we can also give birth to future innovations and disruptions,” said Radha Kapur, Founder & ED of Dice Districts.

As the magnetic Maharashtra Business conclave kicks off, the technology sector is going to be key in terms of investments and Maharashtra is keen to showcase its potential in the technology sector to put Mumbai on India’s technology map.


Nokia to Have a Major Showing at MWC 2018, HMD Global Teases

Nokia to Have a Major Showing at MWC 2018, HMD Global Teases


  • HMD Global’s Juho Sarvikas teases MWC 2018 developments
  • The company is expected to launch new models
  • Nokia 1, Nokia 9, Nokia 3310 4G likely to get some attraction

After grabbing eyeballs at its last outing in Barcelona, HMD Global is now all set to make another splash this year at Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2018, a senior executive teased. The company launched the nostalgic Nokia 3310 and showcased the first troopers from its army of Android smartphones at MWC 2017. And for the forthcoming convention, it is already rumoured to have a bunch of developments, including the Nokia 9 flagship as well as the Android Oreo (Go edition) based Nokia 1.

HMD Global Chief Product Officer Juho Sarvikas on Thursday used his Twitter account to tease the launches planned for the MWC 2018. “Sorry for radio silence. Been super busy planning #MWC2018. Please expect it to be awesome [sic],” Sarvikas tweeted. The executive didn’t define the developments that will be showcased at the forthcoming MWC. However, some recent reports have enough material to help us understand what all will be available from the ever-green Nokia portfolio.

The Nokia family in 2018 is expected to get a list of new members, including the Nokia 1, Nokia 4, Nokia 7, Nokia 8 (2018), and Nokia 9. Alongside these new Nokia smartphone models, the Finnish company is rumoured to be developing a Nokia 3310 4G variant that recently emerged on TENAA certification sitewith Android-based YunOS. The 2018 lineup notably received the Nokia 6 (2018) as the first member.

Amongst all the new Nokia models, the Nokia 9 is expected to be the show-stopper. The smartphone is already rumoured to have top-notch specifications and features such as a dual selfie camera setup and a thin-bezel display. If we believe the ongoing rumours, the Nokia 9 will come in multiple variants and sport a 5.5-inch OLED display as well as a Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor. It is also reported to have 12-megapixel and 13-megapixel camera sensors on the back and a 3250mAh battery with fast charging support. Besides, the smartphone is likely to come with up to 128GB onboard storage and run Android 8.0 Oreo out of the box.

In addition to the Nokia 9, we can safely speculate the Nokia 1 as the new sales-driver for HMD Global. The smartphone, which is rumoured to be one of the first Android Go smartphones, will purportedly feature an HD IPS display, 1GB RAM, and 8GB onboard storage. Despite usual, entry-level specifications, the Android Go presence on the Nokia 1 would make it a distinct option in the market. It is like to have lightweight apps such as Google Maps Go, Files Go, and Google Go among others. Further, the smartphone is rumoured to go on sale in Russia at RUB 5,990 (approximately Rs. 6,750).

We need to wait for some more time to understand what all would be from the side of HMD Global. In the meantime, the company has already registered itself as an MWC exhibitor to hint some big announcements.


Top Insights for the Global Mobile Engine Filtration Market | Technavio

Technavio has published a new report on the global mobile engine filtration market from 2017-2021. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The latest market research report by Technavio on the global mobile engine filtration marketpredicts a CAGR of more than 6% during the period 2017-2021.

The report segments the global mobile engine filtration market by product type (liquid filter and air filter) and by geography (the Americas, EMEA, and APAC). It provides a detailed illustration of the major factors influencing the market, including drivers, opportunities, trends, and industry-specific challenges.

Here are some key findings of the global mobile engine filtration market, according to Technavio heavy industry researchers:

  • Rising global automotive sales: a major market driver
  • In 2016, the liquid filter segment dominated with a market share of more than 65%
  • APAC held the biggest share of the market followed by the Americas and EMEA
  • Bosch Auto Parts, Cummins Filtration, DENSO, MAHLE, Donaldson Company, and Parker Hannifin are the leading players in the market

This report is available at a USD 1,000 discount for a limited time only: View market snapshot before purchasing

Buy 1 Technavio report and get the second for 50% off. Buy 2 Technavio reports and get the third for free.

Market growth analysis

Global passenger cars and commercial vehicles witnessed a combined growth of close to 5% annually during 2011-2016. Commercial and passenger transport vehicles incorporate several different filters, including engine air intake filters, fuel oil filters, lubricating oil filters, and cabin air filters. Thus, the large volume of sales and the growth of the automotive market make the global automobile industry the biggest consumer and driver of filtration systems for mobile internal combustion engines.

According to Gaurav Mohindru, a lead analyst at Technavio for research on engineering tools, “The filtration systems in cars, buses, and other transport vehicles play a significant role in keeping the engine running smoothly while simultaneously extending the vehicle’s lifespan. Although advances in filtration technology have extended the maintenance cycle period after which the automotive engine filters need to be replaced, the market is expected to grow due to the increasing vehicle sales and demand for high-end filters.”

Looking for more information on this market? Request a free sample report

Technavio’s sample reports are free of charge and contain multiple sections of the report including the market size and forecast, drivers, challenges, trends, and more.

Geographical analysis

Technavio researchers anticipate high growth for the global mobile engine filtration market in APAC due to the region being home to several major automobile manufacturers, two-wheeler users, and the bulk of the shipping industry, all of which explain its huge share in the global mobile engine filtration market. Many countries in APAC have been witnessing rapid economic growth and rise in the middle-class population, which is fueling the demand for new vehicles in the region.

Competitive vendor landscape

The larger vendors such as Bosch Auto Parts, Cummins Filtration, DENSO, Donaldson Company, MAHLE, and Parker Hannifin have been focusing on product innovation and developing high-performance products to meet the growing demands of end-use customers as well as increasingly stringent regulations. The smaller vendors, which mostly sell low-cost aftermarket alternatives, may be unable to compete successfully in the market as they do not have sufficient capital to invest in R&D operations. This is expected to fuel further consolidation among filtration system manufacturers as well as engine component vendors during the next five years. For instance, in February 2017, Parker Hannifin acquired major filter manufacturer, CLARCOR, which is expected to boost Parker Hannifin’s ranking in the global market significantly.

Get a sample copy of the global mobile engine filtration market report free of cost

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About Technavio

Technavio is a leading global technology research and advisory company. Their research and analysis focuses on emerging market trends and provides actionable insights to help businesses identify market opportunities and develop effective strategies to optimize their market positions.

With over 500 specialized analysts, Technavio’s report library consists of more than 10,000 reports and counting, covering 800 technologies, spanning across 50 countries. Their client base consists of enterprises of all sizes, including more than 100 Fortune 500 companies. This growing client base relies on Technavio’s comprehensive coverage, extensive research, and actionable market insights to identify opportunities in existing and potential markets and assess their competitive positions within changing market scenarios.


Global executive picks L.A. as world center for urban mobility

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. - SEPTEMBER 07, 2017: John Rossant, who heads LA Commotion, a multi day transpor

John Rossant is founder and chairman of the nonprofit NewCities foundation and creator of LA CoMotion, a big urban mobility conference and festival that’s attracting an international crowd to the Arts District Nov. 15-19.

A former journalist who has organized and produced conferences around the world, including the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Rossant, 62, intends to make LA CoMotion a world-scale annual event. He recently moved with his family from New York to Los Angeles.

Family influence

I grew up in Manhattan. My father was a journalist at the New York Times. We would religiously read the New York Times at the breakfast table. It was a very bookish household. My outlook on life was formed by early reading.

When I was 17, I applied to the University of Wisconsin, where my girlfriend was going. I fell in with students from completely different backgrounds than my own. I think people who grow up in New York often forget how insular New York is to the rest of the country and the rest of the world.

After my freshman year, my dad ended financial support following a big disagreement — and I probably deserved the punishment. I had to drop out for a year, lived in a cold water flat in New York. I worked as a messenger on Wall Street and cleaned mouse cages at a lab. I was on my own financially. Not fun, but it taught me how to survive on my own.

The Cairo spark

When I returned to college, I saw signs for an Arabic course. The calligraphy was beguiling and I said, why not. When I graduated, I won a U.S. State Department fellowship for intensive training in classical Arabic in Cairo. I found myself in this huge, very foreign, exotic, wonderful city. This was clearly the spark that ignited my fascination with cities and how cities are organized.

If the ultimate iconic car culture city could change, any city in the world could change.

— John Rossant on Los Angeles

My first job was in Saudi Arabia, at the English-language Arab News. It was a truly alien place for a journalist back then: an absolute monarchy, a tribal system. Nobody quite understood what a Western journalist did, and I think most people thought I was a CIA operative.

Copines Françaises

Back in New York after a year and a half in the Arabian desert, BusinessWeek called me up one day and said they were opening a Paris office. Would I be interested? I said, “ummm … yes …”

The editor asked me if I spoke French. I told him yes, of course. He said OK, you’re heading to Paris next week. Let’s just say my French was pretty basic so I had to learn on the fly. I had French girlfriends and I forced myself to go to lots of French movies. That worked.

Later BusinessWeek moved me to Rome to cover Italy and the Middle East. I had to learn Italian, of course, and that’s where I was lucky enough to meet my wife. In 1991, I covered the first Gulf War.

After that I was back in Paris as Europe editor. I was at a working lunch in Paris with Maurice Levy, the legendary CEO of Publicis, the big French advertising and public relations firm. He invited me to his office. We had a long discussion of French history and American relations.

Levy was clearly looking for someone who could speak French, who knew about communicating with the Anglophone world. The digital onslaught was just beginning and I didn’t see a bright future for print so I made the decision to leave BusinessWeek. I was made head of communications and public affairs at Publicis.

Digital tsunami

The very week I joined Publicis, Rupert Murdoch made a prescient speech in Washington where he told assembled newspaper and magazine editors: “You’re all going to be out of a job. There’s a digital tsunami coming.”

I immediately recommended that Publicis launch a high-level conference on the future of media. I cut a deal with Prince Albert of Monaco to create the Monaco Media Forum. I developed a real passion for bringing smart people around a table to talk about issues.

For several years I was in charge of producing the famous World Economic Forum in Davos — and I started to gain a reputation as someone who could put together these kind of events.

At the same time, I was more and more fascinated and preoccupied by cities, the development of cities. A majority of the human population was moving to cities. At the same time, the digital revolution and the Internet held out the promise of radically reorganizing cities. For the better.

L.A.: Where it’s at

I created a nonprofit foundation, the NewCities Foundation. Our big annual meeting has now been held in Paris, Sao Paulo, Dallas, Jakarta, Montreal and Songdo, a very successful new city near Seoul, [South] Korea.

More and more, though, I saw that the huge disruption sweeping over the mobility and transportation sector would impact cities everywhere, and I saw a need for a global gathering on urban transportation.

I read Mayor Eric Garcetti’s Mobility 2035 transportation plan and was impressed. If the ultimate iconic car culture city could change, any city in the world could change. So why not anchor a global mobility conference in Los Angeles? L.A. in particular and California in general are emerging as the center of smart thinking about mobility.

Take a leap

When I look back, it’s important to trust your instincts and leap into the unknown. You have to kind of just take risks with things. It’s a lesson that’s hard to impart to your children, because risks sometimes don’t turn out so well.