Facebook Announces a New Sleep Mode for Messenger Kids App

Facebook Announces a New Sleep Mode for Messenger Kids App

In an effort to give more control to parents, Facebookhas launched a Sleep Mode in its Messenger Kids that will allow parents to set predetermined “off times” for the app on a child’s device. When the app is in Sleep Mode, kids cannot send or receive messages or video calls, play with the creative camera or receive notifications. If they try to open the app, they’ll see a message telling them that it’s in sleep mode and to come back later.

“Parents told us they would like controls that make the app inaccessible at a certain time, like during dinner, homework time or bedtime. We took this feedback to heart and built a feature that gives that level of control to parents,” Tarunya Govindarajan, Product Manager at Facebook, said in a blog post.

With Sleep Mode, parents can set a designated off time and each day at the designated time, the app will “go to sleep” and not be accessible to kids during those hours. The mode is controlled from the Parent Control centre in the parent’s Facebook account and the “off times” can be changed at any time.

How Messenger Kids’ Sleep Mode works

Go to the Messenger Kids controls in the main Facebook app. Tap on the child’s name, and then on Sleep Mode in the App Controls’ section. Now, set the times you want the app to turn off for your child.

You can set different times for weekdays versus weekends. Once you set the limits, the child will not be able to use the app during those hours. Parents can access all of their controls from the Messenger Kids controls in the main Facebook app.

“In addition to Sleep Mode, parents can add and remove contacts, delete the child’s account, or create a new account right from the control panel,” the post added.

Since its launch in December 2017, Messenger Kids is facing widespread criticism for encouraging children to join social media. Child health experts the world over have written to Facebook to withdraw the app designed specifically for children under the age of 13.

British Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt in December warned the social media giant to stay away from his children.

“Facebook told me they would come back with ideas to PREVENT underage use of their product, but instead they are actively targeting younger children. Stay away from my kids please Facebook and act responsibly!” Hunt had posted on Twitter.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

OnePlus 6 launch date confirmed for May 18, price tipped at Rs 39,999

Chinese smartphone maker OnePlus will launch its upcoming flagship smartphone OnePlus 6 in India on May 18, Moneycontrol has learnt. The phone will likely cost Rs 39,999.

The upcoming OnePlus phone has been subject to a lot of speculation over the past few months.

The company, whose motto is to ‘Never Settle’, has released various teasers about the upcoming phone’s features under the slogan ‘The speed you need’. Here’s everything we know about the phone so far.

The phone will keep up with the latest design trend in Android smartphones and will sport an iPhone X-like notch at the top and extremely thin bezels on the sides and the bottom. Those who dislike notches will be able to black out the sides of the notches while in the landscape mode.

The company has been on a pursuit to provide its users with ‘burdenless experience’ and has confirmed the phone will be featuring the latest Snapdragon 845 processor along with an 8GB RAM. The confirmation also says the phone will be sporting 256GB storage.

Media reports had speculated that the OnePlus 6 could cost in the early 40 thousands, but a cost of Rs 39,999 would come as a relief to fans of OnePlus that like the phone for its top-end features and competitive pricing.

The company almost confirmed that the phone will be waterproof in the tweet below which says, “Don’t you just hate it when you have to stop using your phone when it rains? So do we”. However, it is unclear whether the phone will be IP67 or IP68 certified.

The slider button on OnePlus devices were traditionally used to shift between volume settings, but on OnePlus 6, the slider can also be used to adjust focus while clicking pictures.

[“Source-moneycontrol”]

With the launch of TESS, NASA will boost its search for exoplanets

illustration of TESS telescpope

NASA is stepping up its search for planets outside our solar system. Its next exoplanet hunting telescope, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), is due to launch from Cape Canaveral on the evening of April 16.

Following the Kepler space telescope’s discovery of more than 5,000 possible exoplanets since 2009, TESS will continue the galactic census — flagging more planetary candidates for further study.

Astronomers expect TESS to find about 20,000 planets in its first two years in operation, focusing on nearby, bright stars that will be easy for other telescopes to investigate later. About 500 of those expected exoplanets would be less than twice the size of Earth — and therefore may be good places to look for life.

NASA’s next exoplanet hunting telescope, TESS

SMALL BUT MIGHTY NASA’s next exoplanet hunting telescope, TESS, is only 1.5 meters tall (shown here with engineers). Its size is partly due to the fact that it was designed to launch on NASA’s small Taurus rocket, but will instead launch on a larger SpaceX Falcon 9 on April 16.

ORBITAL ATK

The TESS mission is “a whole new opening for exoplanet studies,” MIT astronomer Sara Seager, TESS’ deputy science director, said during a news conference describing the upcoming launch.

TESS will be the first NASA science mission launched on the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will trace an unusual, elliptical path between Earth and the moon that will enable it to observe at least 85 percent of the sky — 350 times as much sky as Kepler saw.

Most of the planets found by Kepler orbit stars 1,000 light-years away or farther. TESS will focus on 200,000 stars that are a few hundred light-years away at most, and shine between 30 to 100 times brighter on average than Kepler’s.

The brighter the star, the easier it is to determine its planet’s characteristics, such as its mass and whether it has an atmosphere, Seager says. “Photons are our currency — the more, the better,” she says.

That follow-up will help TESS avoid some of Kepler’s pitfalls. Because Kepler’s stars were so far and so dim, some of its planet candidates were confirmed as actual planets only by statistics rather than by other telescopes. And not all those confirmations may stick. A recent paper posted at arXiv.org showed that Kepler 452b, an Earth-sized planet that orbits a sunlike star at the same distance Earth orbits the sun, may be a mirage (SN: 8/22/15, p. 16). Many of TESS’ planets won’t face the same uncertainty.

the TESS sattelite

COASTING IN SPACE The TESS satellite’s unusual 13.7-day orbit uses the moon’s gravity to stabilize it, so it needs little fuel. During the part of the orbit colored blue, TESS will observe the sky. During the part marked in orange, it will transmit data back to Earth. The gray ring marks the moon’s orbit.

NASA

But the way TESS will search for exoplanets is the same as Kepler: The satellite will watch stars for signs of dimming, which can indicate that a planet is transiting, or crossing in front of, the star. Measuring how much starlight is blocked can tell astronomers the size of the planet.

Once TESS finds a planet, astronomers will need more information to understand its qualities, such as whether it’s rocky or gassy (SN Online: 6/19/17). For that, other telescopes will follow up. Ground-based telescopes will measure the gravitational tug of a planet on its host star to learn the planet’s density, which is a clue to its composition. Astronomers plan to measure masses for at least 50 TESS planets that are smaller than Neptune in the hopes that many of them will have rocky, and therefore potentially habitable, surfaces.

Undiscovered country

Before TESS, most known planets were more than 1,000 light-years away, with a few closer than 30 light-years (a parsec is 3.26 light-years). TESS (orange circles) will fill in the gap. The size of the circles represents how easy the planets are to find.

graph showing where TESS will be able to detect planets
ZACH BERTA-THOMPSON

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, now scheduled to launch in 2020, will then check some of those planets for signs of life (SN: 4/30/16, p. 32).

“This is one of the major questions that TESS is intended to answer: Where will we be pointing Webb?” said the mission’s principal investigator, MIT astronomer George Ricker, at the press conference. Webb will peer at the starlight filtering through planetary atmospheres to try to detect molecules that could be produced by something living on the surface.

It will take a few months for TESS to swing into its regular orbit before it begins collecting data. At that point, it will be able to use the moon’s gravity to stabilize itself for decades in orbit without using extra fuel. The mission is set to last two years, but could continue taking data almost indefinitely.

“TESS is not going to be limited by any expendable or other aspects,” Ricker said. “It will be basically limited by how long NASA has the patience to fund the mission.”

[“Source-sciencenews”]

PM Narendra Modi congratulates ISRO for launch of navigation satellite IRNSS-1I

Image result for PM Narendra Modi congratulates ISRO for launch of navigation satellite IRNSS-1I

NEW DELHI: Prime Minister Narendra Moditoday congratulated ISRO scientists for the successful launch of navigation satellite IRNSS-1I and said it will benefit the common man of the country.

ISRO’s navigation satellite INRSS-1I was today launched by PSLV-C41 from the spaceport at Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh and was successfully placed in the designated orbit.

“Congratulations to our scientists on the successful launch of navigation satellite IRNSS-1I by PSLV. This success will bring benefits of our space programme to the common man. Proud of team @isro!” the prime minister tweeted.

The PSLV-C41/IRNSS-1I Mission blasted off at 4.04 am from the first launchpad at the Sathish Dhawan Space Centre. It was a normal lift-off, ISRO officials said.

Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO)Chairman K Sivan described the mission as a success and congratulated the scientists.

He said IRNSS-1I was successfully placed in the designated orbit.

IRNSS-1I is expected to replace IRNSS-1A, the first of the seven navigation satellites, which was rendered ineffective after its three rubidium atomic clocks failed. The seven satellites are part of the NavIC navigation satellite constellation.

The launch is ISRO’s second attempt at sending a replacement satellite.

[“Source-economictimes”]