Take Money and Gifts From Other Parties But Vote for AAP: Arvind Kejriwal

Image result for Take Money and Gifts From Other Parties But Vote for AAP: Arvind KejriwalNew Delhi: Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal on Thursday asked voters not to refuse money or gifts offered to them by other political parties, but cast their votes for the Aam Aadmi Party.

“On the night of election, do they (other political parties) come to give money or not? Accept that money or gifts because it has been bought with money which they stole from you,” Kejriwal said at a roadshow without mentioning the BJP or Congress.

“What will you do? Take it, don’t deny it, but vote for jhadu (broom, AAP’s election symbol),” the AAP chief said in the roadshow in support of South Delhi candidate Raghav Chadha.

Kejriwal had made a similar comment earlier this month, following which he was sent a show cause notice by the Election Commission.

He was joined by actress Swara Bhasker in the roadshow.

Chadha said the youth would reject the “politics of hooliganism”.

The roadshow started at Bapu Sambhav Camp, Chattarpur and ended at Kundan Chowk in Bijwasan.

Kejriwal urged people to vote on Sunday “even though it will be hot during the day”.

Delhi goes to polls on Sunday and the result would be declared on May 23.

[“source=news18”]

Money Money Money: Financial planning for couples

Image result for Money Money Money: Financial planning for couplesFinancial planning is required at every stage in life to realise your goals and this exercise takes new dimensions when there is a life partner in the picture.

So how should couples look at aligning their ideas goals and finances? What are the dos and don’ts that can help you move forward on the path of financial independence and fulfilment?

CNBC-TV18’s Surabhi Upadhyay is in conversation with personal finance expert Amit Kukreja and Aarti Dewan & Saurav Dey, couple that has chosen the financial planning path to secure their future.

[“source=cnbctv18”]

Artisans from 17 districts to come up with creative exhibits for three-day art fair

Artisans from 17 districts to come up with creative exhibits for three-day art fair

Kolkata: Around 60 artists, crafts persons and weavers from 17 districts of Bengal will take part in a three-day fair titled Lokshilpa O Karukriti mela, which will start from May 7.

It may be mentioned that after coming to power in 2011, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee took up schemes to help the artisans. Their products are being exported through Biswa Bangla shops.

Around 2 lakh folk artists are receiving monthly stipend and are given programmes at cultural shows organised by different state government departments.

Melas are held throughout the year where the artisans can go and sell their products. Many Patchitris are invited to attend fairs held in European and other countries.

People from foreign countries are found to attend the melas that are held in different parts of Bengal.

The three-day fair will be inaugurated by Alokananda Roy while Sabyasachi Basu Ray Chaudhuri, vice chancellor of Rabindra Bharati University (RBU), will preside over the function. The mela will be organised by the West Bengal State Akademi of Dance Drama Music and Visual Arts of RBU.

Artisans from West Midnapore district will bring patachitras, mats, and decorative items made with buffalo horns and lac items from East Midnapore.

Clay dolls from south 24-Parganas and batik products from Birbhum and Howrah districts will be displayed at the mela. Wood carvings from Bardhaman district, dokra ornaments, shola handicrafts and kantha-stitch items from Birbhum district and traditional clay models from Nadia district will also be on display.

The famous Baluchari sarees from Bankura district, Chhau dance masks from Purulia district and bamboo handicrafts from Malda district, jute crafts from Murshidabad district, wooden masks and dhokra items from South Dinajpur district, Polia clay models from North Dinajpur district and traditional Mech handicrafts from Alipurduar district will be brought at the mela.

Shitalpatis from Cooch Behar, traditional Lepcha handicrafts from Kalimpong and wood carvings from Darjeeling district will be on display. The mela will remain open from 8am to 8pm.

[“source=millenniumpost”]

Creativity for change: how these artists remind us that progress must come with a purpose

Kochi-Muziris Biennale

The fourth edition of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale features creative works by 95 artists in 10 locations around the heritage Fort Kochi district, as well as nine satellite venues. See Part Iand Part II of our photo essays, as well as our coverage of the Bangkok Biennale.

From politics to nature, the art works in this photo essay point a way to hope in their own creative manner. For example, some artists go beyond paints and sculptures to show how ropes (Mrinalini Mukherjee) and seashells (Julie Gough) can be used in installations.

Crushed dreams, the sorrow of conflict, and displacement after natural calamities leave deep scars on society (Rula Halawani, Srinagar Biennale, Chittoprasad Bhattachary). Social divides continue to thrive even after the end of the colonial era (BV Suresh). Rising corruption plagues emerging economies, holding back their right to progress. Reckless urban and rural development wreak havoc on habitat and nature.

It takes sensitisation and a demand for justice to dissect and tackle social-political problems. The artists in this photo essay go beyond images of doom and gloom to show that creative solutions can indeed be found, and in a sustainable manner. They raise awareness about the importance of human rights, dignity, identity, inclusion and expression (Zanelle Muholi; the Braille edition of the Biennale brochure).

“Success for an artist comes from the happiness of making a connect with the audience. It comes from sensitising them to the loss of others, and helping them be grateful for what they have,” said painter-photographer Manisha Gera Baswani, in a chat with YourStory.

Her exhibit, titled Postcards from Home, features photographs of Indian and Pakistani artists whose parents moved across the border during partition. Those who have overcome their sense of loss and displacement in a dignified manner are a source of inspiration for the next generation, she explains.

She advises aspiring artists to listen to their heart, and have faith that the impact of their work will eventually emerge. This is particularly important in a time of international tension and domestic conflict, Manisha urges.

Now, what have you done today to pause and take stock of the world around us, and do your bit to create a better place for us all?

[“source=yourstory”]