Mickey and Minnie AR Emoji arrive in time for Galaxy S9 launch


If you think the Galaxy S9’s personalized AR emoji creations are creepy, well, you’re right. But as teased by Samsung at its launch event in MWC a few weeks ago, some familiar Disney faces are joining the robo-avatar party. Both Mickey and Minnie will be available starting today — coincidentally, the day that the S9 and S9 plus go on sale. It’s just the start of Disney’s AR emoji series. Samsung says more will come throughout the year and will include The Incredibles cast and (yes!) Frozen. Ugh, just as long as it’s not Olaf.

Samsung could do with the help. Its AR Emoji are divisive, and aren’t quite as slick as the iPhone X’s Animoji. That said, they’re two very different takes on face-tracking augmented reality. AR Emoji crafts new avatars for every user it scans, while there’s only a limited selection of Animoji to toy with on the iPhone. We’re yet to test it out the Disney additions on our review Galaxy S9, but by the sheer simplicity of Mickey’s design, we’re hopeful for a less creepy outcome.


A new look for gear milling – Iscar

Technology and its products are often causative: A technology might be applied to develop more effective and intelligent products, which in turn can play an important role in advancing that technology.

This interrelationship may be observed in metalworking. Over the last few years, leading-edge technology has resulted in multitasking machine tools and machining centers with impressive working possibilities. At the same time, this progress in machine tool engineering is significantly changing metal cutting technology.

The advanced multifunctional machine tools increasingly widen the range of machining operations that can be performed. Technological processes developed for these machines are oriented to maximise machining operation for one-setup manufacturing, creating a new source for more accurate and productive manufacturing. Milling gears and splines is one of the operations suitable for performing on the new machines.


Traditionally, gear (and spline) making is a complicated process that involves milling, chamfering, grinding and other operations. With batch manufacturing, the majority is made on specific machines like gear hobbing, gear shaving, gear grinding and so on. Developments in technology have changed the limits of hardness for cutting and considerably increased operational accuracy. This in turn has reduced abrasive machining in gear making while decreasing rough cutting. The modern multifunctional machines, which meet the requirements of one-set-up manufacturing, have proved to be perfect for various gear making operations.

These new machines require appropriate tooling and cutting tools manufacturers should prepare their response accordingly, which is why producers of general purpose rotating cutting tools are reconsidering the role of gear-milling cutters in their programme for standard product lines.

Iscar, one of the leaders in the cutting tool industry, is embodying this trend with a three-point programme for form gear making tools:

• Milling cutters carrying indexable inserts
• Milling cutters with replaceable cutting heads based on the T-Slot concept
• Milling cutters with replaceable Multi-Master cutting heads

ModuGear, the family of indexable gear milling cutters reflects a conventional design approach, comprising disk-type tools with tangentially clamped LNET inserts. The tangential clamping principle provides an extremely rigid and durable cutter structure that results in stable and precise enough machining tooth or spline profiles. Its principal application is producing involute gears of relatively low accuracy and rough gear-milling operations that feature a 1mm to 1.75mm gear module range.


The cutters with replaceable heads have two significant advantages compared with gear milling tools carrying indexable inserts. They offer better precision and allow the design of gear-milling cutters that are small in diameter but feature quite a large number of teeth. The replaceable heads are mounted in bodies (shanks), which are standard-line products suitable not only for the gear-milling heads but also for other types of head (for milling slots and grooves, for example). This enables customers to increase operating efficiency of the versatile shanks and to reduce tool stock, providing added value.

The replaceable solid carbide heads of the T-Gear SD D32-M…-SP15 family are mounted in standard T-Slot SD-SP15 cylindrical shanks and transform the latter into 32mm diameter gear milling cutters. The precise profile of the cutters’ teeth and the accurate and reliable SP-connection between the shank and the head define its range of use: Milling involute gears featuring a 1mm to 2mm module.

Both types of milling cutters (those with indexable inserts and those with replaceable heads) meet the requirements of standard DIN 3972, basic profile II.

There are two types of Multi-Master spline and gear making solid carbide heads. The first type is represented by the MM SS heads that were specially designed for milling involute spline shafts, specified by DIN 5480 and ANSI B92.1 standards. These heads are intended for 1mm, 1.25mm, 1.5mm and 3mm module (DIN 5480) and 8mm, 10mm, 12mm and 24mm diametral pitch (ANSI B92.1).

The heads of the second type, MM SG, are used in milling spur gears in accordance with DIN 3972 (module 1mm to 1.75mm) and ANSI B6.1 (diametral pitch 15mm to 24mm) standards.

The main application field for Multi-Master heads is the efficient production of small to medium batches of spline and spur gears in various industrial branches.

The world of gears is very rich and multiform, embracing a wide variety of external and internal gears like spur, helical, bevel, hypoid, and more. Manufacturing these gears encompasses an entire, dynamic industrial sector with its own methods, equipment and tooling. The introduction of multitasking machines in gear milling as a serious alternative to a dedicated machine represents a new challenge to this sector and producers of commonly used cutting tools should be ready for this significant change. Iscar meets this challenge while maintaining the requisite high standards demanded by end users.


Google Files Go Updated With Support for Google Drive File Backup

Google Files Go Updated With Support for Google Drive File Backup


  • The app can now backup files straight to Google Drive
  • The update also brings SD card features and bug fixes
  • Google Drive needs to be installed on your phone to use the feature

Google recently released the latest software update for its Files Go app on Android. The update, although minor, brings along a crucial feature that allows users to backup their files on Google Drivethrough the Files Go app. Apart from that, the update also adds “additional SD card features” and several bug fixes and improvements. According to the changelog, this update was first released on February 15, 2018.

To make use of this feature, you will need to go into Downloads, click on the arrow beside the file you wish to backup, then click on Back up to Google Drive and enter details such as Document Title, preferred Google account, and preferred folder in Google Drive. Users need to have the Google Drive app installed on their devices for the feature to work.

Available for all Android devices, the Files Go was launched at the Google For India 2017 event in December last year. The app, like other Google Go apps, has been custom built for smartphones with low inbuilt storage and up to 1GB of RAM. It will come pre-installed on all Android Oreo (Go edition)devices.

In its latest update received last month, Google Files Go app got several new features including support for Android tablets, an SD card-only view, and the new “Open With” flow that lets users choose the destination app for the selected file.

While the announcement was made a few months back, smartphones running Android Oreo (Go edition) haven’t yet been unveiled. However, Google states that it will be making announcements on that front during Mobile World 2018 in Barcelona slated for later this month.


Want to Track the Tesla Roadster in Space? There’s a Website for That

Want to Track the Tesla Roadster in Space? There's a Website for That

An electrical engineer working in the aerospace industry has created a website to track Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s Roadster – the car tied to Falcon Heavy rocket by SpaceX– which is zooming through space.

SpaceX fan Ben Pearson has created Where is Roadster website that makes use of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Horizons data to track the progress of the car and its dummy driver ‘Starman’ through space, TechCrunch reported on Sunday.

The website would also predict the car’s path and let people know when it would come close to meeting up with various planets and the Sun.

The platform would even tell the Roadster’s current position as well as its speed and whether it was moving towards or away from Earth and Mars at any given moment.

The website is not officially affiliated with the SpaceX or Tesla, Musk took a note of it on Twitter.

“I’m sure it’s parked around here somewhere http://whereisroadster.com,” Musk, the SpcaeX CEO, tweeted late on Sunday.

The car was originally intended to be inserted into an orbit that would fly closer to Mars but the third engine burn of the Falcon Heavy upper stage “exceeded” that orbit, sending the car into deep space.

Currently, the Roadster is still much closer to Earth — 2.25 million miles away — than to Mars, 137.5 million miles away, Fortune reported.

“Meanwhile, Mars is moving too, so when the Roadster first intersects its orbit this July, the planet itself will already be millions of miles away,” the report said.

After that, the Roadster will actually return to something close to Earth’s orbit, though again, Earth itself won’t be anywhere close.

According to the site’s data, the Roadster won’t actually be close to Mars until early October of 2020. The car does not have any landing equipment or thrusters to land it on the surface.

Earlier in February, the Virtual Telescope Project of Tenagra Observatory in Arizona caught the car moving across the night sky.

Gianluca Masi of the Virtual Telescope Project and Michael Schwartz of the Tenagra Observatory were able to pinpoint the car’s location by using data generated by the Solar Systems Dynamics Laboratory at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

The project said that the Tesla was “quite bright”.

It released a GIF showing the Tesla moving across space, looking a lot like a comet or asteroid. The GIF strings together 54 images captured by Tenagra, CNET reported.