Analytics, Insights Create Exceptional Donor Experiences

It’s an undeniable fact: The experience you create for donors is directly tied to your ability to retain and upgrade them. According to a recent study by Bloomerang, 46 percent of lapsed donors cited they stopped giving because the organization failed to provide a meaningful experience. Today’s donors want to feel recognized, heard, and valued. They want the same kind of personal and relevant experience they get from other brands on a daily basis.

However, creating that kind of donor experience involves more than just assessing a donor’s wealth and giving history. It also involves creating a complete picture of who they are and how they are engaging with your organization.

The methods of engagement was the topic of a session “The Art and Science of creating meaningful experiences at scale for your high value donors,” presented by Hilary Noon, senior vice president, insight, analytics, and experience at Pursuant and Bente Weitekamp, vice president of development at the Community Health Network Foundation in Indiana during the 2018 Bridge To Integrated Marketing Conference.

For some organizations, that might be understanding your donors’ connections to the mission or understanding when your last point of connection was or how they were impacted by your organization. Described below are a few ways your organization can build more meaningful relationships with your donors by applying what you learn from “listening” to them, according to Noon and Weitekamp.

* Dig Into All of Your Data Sources: Look at all of the data and insights you have about your donors — including information that lives outside of the development department or a structured system. This might include determining if and how they benefited from your organization, event registrations, marketing activity, etc. Tap into anecdotal feedback from your staff and volunteers on the front line who interact regularly with your donors.

Look at online behavior. What are they clicking on? What content are they consuming? What sites are they coming from before they arrive at your page?  Where are they going next?

Using data to find out everything you can about your donors enables you to provide them with an experience that is tailor-made to their specific passions and interests.

* Capture Motivations And Preferences Through Primary Research And Social Insights:One of the simplest ways to listen to your donors is to ask them. There are many mechanisms for doing this including surveys, focus groups and social listening. Surveys that ask donors why they gave, and how and when they’d like to hear from you ensures you’re not bombarding them with information they don’t care about and allows you to avoid wasting money. This is most effectively done as close to a transaction as possible. Just be sure you clearly communicate why you are asking for their feedback and how it will be used. Help them see what is in it for them.

While it might seem like giving donors’ the option to choose how and when they hear from you is giving up control, it often leads to greater response rates and increases the likelihood that the donor will feel more connected with your organization’s brand.

Using a social media monitoring or listening tool will provide insight into what people are saying about your organization, the volume of the buzz and the sentiment associated with your brand. Conversations about specific events or programs that your organization hosts can provide great insights into the experiences people are having and where improvements can be made. Keep in mind that social media is often where people go to share opinions in the extreme so use these tools along with the other tools mentioned to give you a more balanced view.

These tools can give you an important view into the hearts and minds of your donors. The key is to use the information you capture to improve the donor’s experience.

* Create Immersive Experiences That Drive Engagement: Immersive experiences are difficult to offer to all donors. Digital fundraising provides nonprofits with a new opportunity — at scale — to not only engage donors, but “listen” to them based on how they respond and interact.

For organizations that are fortunate to have a bricks and mortar presence, such as a hospital, a school or an arts organization, immersive experiences can be delivered in person. Today, every organization has the opportunity to create similar experiences through an interactive digital campaign that unlocks why donors care about your cause.

It isn’t as easy as simply putting an experience online, however. Gather what data and insights you have about your donors from listening to them and then map out the kind of experience that would be most meaningful to them. Be open to continuously refining and improving upon it as you go forward.

Where and how to start

Before you set out to build a listening program, determine which donors are highest priority to focus on. Prioritizing will allow you to go deep with one segment and improve the likelihood that you will create a relevant experience that will drive results.

The speakers suggested zeroing in on a specific aspect of your priority donors’ experience. Choose something that is meaningful to your organization and where you are most likely to have an impact. Consider choosing an experience that is led by a colleague who really supports your desire to focus on the donor experience.  Having a champion for your work will make the whole effort more enjoyable and will improve the likelihood that you will see positive results.

Transform the Donor Experience

Developing an exceptional experience isn’t just a “nice” thing to do for your donors. It’s one of the leading influencers in their desire to give again. It’s what transforms “transactional” fundraising, where you’re primarily soliciting donations with every touch, into a long-term “transformational” relationship-building approach to fundraising.

Taking the time to consider how your organization can leverage analytics and insights to create a more an intentional and meaningful experience will pay off… for your donors AND your organization.

[“Source-thenonprofittimes”]

Google, Improbable Partner for Multi-Player Gaming Experiences With SpatialOS Alpha Platform

Google, Improbable Partner for Multi-Player Gaming Experiences With SpatialOS Alpha Platform

Google, Improbable Partner for Multi-Player Gaming Experiences With SpatialOS Alpha Platform
HIGHLIGHTS
SpatialOS Alpha lets third parties build virtual and simulated world
The platform distributes its processing across multiple cores and servers
Beta version of SpatialOS will be available in Q1 of 2017
Improbable, a London startup, on Tuesday launched its SpatialOS Alpha platform that allows third parties to build virtual and simulated worlds. The platform will be powered by Google’s Cloud Platform which marks a strategic partnership between Google and Improbable.

The SpatialOS platform allows developers to build and test large virtual worlds that can be used in VR gaming experiences and can accommodate thousands of players simultaneously. This scale was previously not possible due to games being developed on single servers.

However, the Google Cloud Platform now lets SpatialOS distribute its processing across multiple cores and servers allowing for heavier tasks and higher level of graphics and detailing than is possible for platforms running on single game engines or servers.

Notably, SpatialOS is able to create hundreds of conventional game engines that overlap each other to create a huge, seamless world. Developers can then create, design, and affect the world as they choose minus the computational restrictions and limited players of a single engine.

SpatialOS wants to take multi-player gaming to another level. The platform can be used by smaller studios to compete with larger companies in creating large multi-player experiences. Few studios have already been working on SpatialOS-based games including Bossa Studios (Worlds Adrift), Spilt Milk Studios (Lazarus), HelloVR (MetaWorld), Entrada Interactive (Rebel Horizons), and Soulbound Studios (Chronicles of Elyria).
For Google, the team-up with Improbable is another step towards its ambition to position its Cloud Platform as a place for developers to create a shared gaming experience to connect players around the world.

A beta version of SpatialOS will be available in Q1 of 2017. Developers can, however, access the platform and tools to test it out with the Game Developer Open Alpha.

Tags: Improbable, SpacialOS Platform, Google, Google Cloud Platform, Cloud, Gaming, Internet

[“source-ndtv”]

Uber Launches ‘Trip Experiences’ API on Its Developer Platform

Uber Launches 'Trip Experiences' API on Its Developer PlatformAt Uber’s first ever Asian hackathon held in Bengaluru on Tuesday, taxi aggregator Uber announced the launch of its Global API called Trip Experiences. Launched on developers.uber.com, it lets startups leverage Uber’s API to provide an enhanced and gamified travel experience during the free time that Uber riders have during their trips.

Saad Ahmed, Business Development Lead, Uber India said that it was also the first time that a global API launch was done from Bengaluru, where the company would be setting up an engineering team.

Dmitry Shevelenko, Head of Business, Uber Developer Platform said that the company’s focus on its API platform, launched in March 2015, had been on helping riders make a booking without having to re-enter the address on the Uber app. A focus on intent to ride has been good for the company, he said, citing Microsoft’s integration of the API into Cortana, which was done from the Hyderabad office.

“The API has been helping folks up to point A. Using our API, someone could rebuild our Uber for Android app. What we’re announcing today is a shift from utility, to opening up the platform for true creativity,” Shevelenko said, adding that the Trip Experiences API opens up opportunities that happen on the trip itself. He calculated that Uber riders had generated 20 billion units of free time on over one billion cumulative Uber trips.

The Trip Experiences API will leave users in control, the company said, adding that only apps specifically given permission will be able to connect to Uber and access their trip details. Users can also turn off the feature on an app by app basis, the company said. The company showcased use cases for apps centred around entertainment, news, dating, gamification, local guides, and IoT-based home automation.

The API can tell developers when the rider has free time, how much free time they have, where they’re coming from, and where they’re going, the company said.

Zomato, Zo Rooms, Housing.com, and Satyam Cinemas were some Internet companies who had integrated Uber’s API into their apps, the company said.

In a recently mailed fact sheet, the company said that it had over 250,000 driver partners on its platform active in India, with a presence in 26 Indian cities.

[“Source-Gadgets”]