10 Big Technology Trends Likely to Emerge in 2016

10 Big Technology Trends Likely to Emerge in 2016

Predicting the future is a dangerous game. It’s easy to speculate and easier still to hope, but what we have to do is carefully look at all the promising developments we’ve seen in the recent past and then evaluate how we think they’ll keep going, and what else they’ll lead to. Some companies are kind enough to provide roadmaps and projections, but surprises can pop up out of anywhere, anytime.

We’ve looked at the state of tech and of the world at large to bring you our list of ten things we think will be significant in the world of personal technology in 2016. From global-scale trends that will shape politics and policy to the individual features of our next smartphones, there’s a lot to think about.

1) The death of the traditional desktop OS
With Microsoft taking full control of Windows 10 updates and doing whatever it can to push users to its latest OS, the traditional notion of the OS is dead in 2016. From forced updates to a dependency on being completely online and licenses tied to specific hardware, we’re heading into a world of subscriptions and service fees that can’t be avoided.

Google already pushes ChromeOS as a gateway to its own services, which are barely usable offline. A steady stream of minor updates will mean there’s no concept of a version number anymore – and your rapidly depleting data cap will make you wish Internet connectivity was better.

(Also see: FUP (Fair Usage Policy) Is an UFP (UnFair Policy))

broadband_test_dec15_ndtv.jpg2) Broadband becomes our lifeblood
You’re only as good as your Internet connection. The music and gaming industries have been quick to adopt streaming as a revenue model, and that means more pressure on your bandwidth limit. This year saw a plethora of music streaming services and 2016 could see the launch of even more – there is also some serious speculation that both Netflix and Amazon Prime Video will arrive in India. It doesn’t stop here.

Both Sony and Nvidia have made their intentions to stream video games to every device on the planet clear as well. Almost every game on PC, PS4, and Xbox One ships in an unfinished state on disc and requires massive updates before you even start playing. What this means is that you need to start upgrading your broadband connection before you upgrade your gadgets.

3) Hardware evolves and improves
Possibly the safest bet to make – 2016 is set to bring about some big changes on the hardware side of things – from televisions to smartphones to home Internet. Most televisions today use LED-backlit LCD panels, but LG brought OLED to the market in 2015 and more manufacturers, including Samsung, Haier and TCL, have announced plans to follow suit in 2016. OLED TVs use a thin, electrically charged organic film to emit light, and each pixel generates its own light. OLED TVs have many advantages, including lighter and thinner panels, deeper blacks, and wider viewing angles.

USB Type-C ports are also expected to become commonplace on smartphones and PCs, and will finally make it easier to plug your phone into its data cable or charger. On the connectivity front, 4G network capabilities will grow, and more operators will be available for to users in India to choose from, and 5G will begin trials in some parts of the world.

More phones will have high-resolution screens, and more flagship smartphones will have to step up to at least Quad-HD or 4K resolution. Finally, we hope to see e-SIM cards also make an appearance. This would mean that it would no longer be necessary to insert a different SIM card into your phone for different operators; all you’d have to do is select the network of your choosing.

4) Devices may take on fresh new shapes
Smartphones, tablets and computers in 2016 will adopt new form factors. Samsung is expected to finally bring its foldable screens to market, which will allow devices to be truly flexible. It may be possible to fold your huge smartphone and put it away in your pocket, or bend it just as much as you like. Curved screens are also expected to become more common. This will allow for more variety in the designs and form factors of our devices.

We can expect smartphones in 2016 to keep getting slimmer. Reports have already emerged that theiPhone 7 will be 1mm slimmer by ditching the 3.5mm socket, and Android manufacturers will surely follow suit. There is an increasing demand for slimmer phones, and manufacturers will do all they can to cater to it.

samsung_curved_screen_samsung.jpg5) Virtual reality and augmented reality will still be just around the corner
Virtual and augmented reality experiences are closer than ever, but as far as mainstream acceptance is concerned, they’re still going to be just beyond the reach of most of us. Ever since the Oculus Rift first burst onto the scene with its blockbuster Kickstarter fundraiser, we’ve tried out a number of different headsets, and the frontrunners today are essentially down to the Oculus Rift, the HTC Vive, and thePlayStation VR.

These are all supposed to launch in 2016, though the requirements in terms of space, compatible hardware, and high pricing means that none of them are going to be accessible to most people. Augmented reality, in the form of Microsoft’s Hololens for example, is a different kind of experience – instead of immersing yourself in the virtual world, augmented reality is about bringing virtual elements into the real world. Google Glass is another example.

Hololens will be expensive, and like the leading VR solutions, it will not be relevant to the majority of people in 2016. Both VR and AR are very exciting technologies that are making huge strides forward, but there’s still going to be a little wait before they become truly mainstream.

xiaomi_manu_MIA2.jpg6) The ‘Make in India’ initiative will gain momentum
The Indian government’s initiative to make this country a global manufacturing hub is going to really explode on a big scale next year. The wheels are already in motion as over the past few months, smartphone makers including Xiaomi, Asus and Gionee have announced plans to assemble phones at Foxconn’s Sri City facility in Andhra Pradesh. Qualcomm too, recently put forward its program to encourage product and ecosystem creation for smartphones and the Internet of Things (IoT) across sectors like banking, healthcare, agriculture, wearables and smart cities. The initiative has also been noticed by the likes of Twitter, which has recently launched a special emoji to symbolise it.

There’s a mega event being scheduled by the government of India in Mumbai from February 13 to 18 called ‘Make in India Week’, which will highlight the people, policies and partnerships which are paving the way forward for a digital India.

7) The Internet of Things (IoT) is only going to get bigger
The Internet of Things (IoT) concept has been just that, a concept, but 2016 could be the year it goes mainstream. Chances are, you won’t even notice it. Gartner estimates nearly 6.4 billion connected devices in use globally, which would be a 30 percent jump from this year. These might not be actual devices that you have on your person, but still gather information about your habits in order to give you personalised experiences. For instance, the next time you step out to buy a train ticket, the automated ticket teller could already know your daily travel route and dispense the appropriate ticket without you having to do anything.

Smart devices have already started percolating into the Indian market. Cube 26’s Smart Bulb andPhilips’ Hue are two such examples, and we expect many more to arrive next year. The policy framework for IoT is still being laid out and India is aiming for a six percent share in this $300 billion global industry. In addition, Amazon Web Services has launched a cloud platform for IoT which helps devices with limited memory or battery life communicate with each other. Global bigwigs including Google, Intel, Qualcomm, Cisco, Vodafone and Samsung, to name a few, are all heavily invested in IoT and believe this is where the future of personal technology is heading.

samsung_gear_vr_samsung.jpg8) Privacy and security become political weapons against Internet freedom
As incidents of terrorism and violence occur, security and early detection become the topics that politicians most love to harp on. Right at this moment, multiple agencies in countries around the world are trying to force manufacturers to add backdoors to their hardware and software, reduce the strength of commonly used encryption standards (or ban them outright), spy on all kinds of communications, and bump up surveillance using the best technology available.

As private citizens, our lives will be impacted heavily by whatever results from these efforts. We might begin to see a world in which devices track you all the time whether you like it or not. It’s already tough enough to buy a SIM card, but France is trying to ban the Tor network, Kazakhstan wants to force all users to allow remote access to their devices, several countries want to restrict Internet access, and the upcoming US presidential election is already full of rhetoric about the Internet and what Silicon Valley should do.

9) Devices gain cognitive capabilities
Cognitive computing, machine learning, artificial intelligence and neural networks: all overlapping terms for the kind of advanced device behaviour we’re going to start seeing in 2016. Pretty soon, we’ll be able to expect our gadgets and accessories to learn about us and our environments in order to make specific, subjective decisions. Qualcomm will start shipping its flagship Snapdragon 820 processor, which it touts will be able to identify subjects in photographs along with lighting and composition in order to quickly adjust settings, amongst other things. There are even applications in security, such as malware pattern detection, and in natural user interfaces, such as speech and handwriting processing.

Over time, developers will be able to create all kinds of new experiences, and assistants like Siri will be able to interact naturally and deliver results to us depending on our schedules and preferences. This is not only going to be the next huge smartphone feature, it’s going to change all kinds of digital devices, starting in 2016.

internet_tree_pixabay.jpg10) The sharing economy’s troubles are far from over
By now, we’ve come to be familiar with Uber, Airbnb, and various other platforms that let us turn our skills, possessions and time into money. On the flipside, there are those which want to make our lives easier by outsourcing errands such as grocery shopping and food delivery. The two concepts work together, since there are people willing to pay for such conveniences, and people willing to earn by providing them. Sitting pretty in the middle, platforms take a cut and have very little to do other than manage supply and demand.

(Also see: Rocket Internet’s Rocky Flight in India)

The second half of this year has seen an explosion of such hyperlocal startups, focusing on specific tasks or pain points that they can help people overcome. We haven’t yet seen how well they will work and how long they will all last – but it stands to reason that 2016 will see a lot of consolidation as not all platforms which duplicate each-others’ functionality can hope to survive.

Customers who try these services and become used to them should be prepared to have them wind up in short order – especially if they’re providing unsustainable discounts. On the other hand, those which have built up their user bases will ease up on promotions and then you’ll have to decide whether they’re worth the expense.

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Culture Shock: Samsung’s Mobile Woes Rooted in Hardware Legacy

Culture Shock: Samsung's Mobile Woes Rooted in Hardware Legacy

Efforts to revive its once stellar smartphone fortunes may be doomed if Samsung Electronics cannot overcome its dominant engineering culture, according to serving and former executives and those who have dealt with the company.

This culture, they say, has stymied many previous efforts to develop software and service platforms to support the smartphone business. In the past year several such services have closed down, at least one of them within a year of being launched.

“There’s a lot of distrust of top executives who can actually implement stuff that is more of a software and services offering,” said one person familiar with the company’s inner workings. “It’s still ‘we know how to sell boxes, we sell boxes’.”

Growth in handset sales is slowing as the smartphone market matures, and without its own distinctive software, content and services, Samsung has little to differentiate itself from other Android phone makers selling similar devices at lower prices.

Samsung points to the launch of its mobile payments service, Samsung Pay, and its home control “Internet of Things” platform, SmartThings, as among the signs it has learned from its past.

But this may not be enough.

Interviews with former and serving employees paint a picture of confusion and overlap between competing divisions, where the short-term interests of promoting hardware trump long-term efforts to build platforms that would add value for customers and increase their loyalty to the brand.

One said he only learned from someone outside the company that the hands-free app his team was updating for the upcoming Galaxy S4 launch had competition – from inside Samsung. For the manager, who has since left the company but declined to be identified because his present employer does business with Samsung, it was one of many examples of the low priority the hardware-minded company placed on software, which was treated as little more than a marketing tool inside the firm.

“Samsung’s upper management just inherently doesn’t understand software,” the former employee said. “They get hardware – in fact, they get hardware better than anyone else. But software is a completely different ballgame.”

As a result, critics say, initiatives involving software or services languish and often fail.

Despite being pre-installed on Galaxy phones, Samsung’s ChatON messaging service gained few adherents and closed without fanfare in March, while the Milk Video app, a high profile project run by newly hired US executives, lasted a year, closing in November.

Shrinking margins
To be sure, Samsung’s struggles are hardly unique – firms such as HTC Corp, Nokia and BlackBerry also failed in their attempt to develop viable platforms.

And Samsung overcame a late start in smartphones and still remains the No.1 player: researcher TrendForce says it will this year ship about 100 million more than No. 2 Apple Inc.

But former and serving executives say Samsung has failed to support innovation within the company, shrinking margins to stay competitive while losing ground to Chinese rivals such as Huawei Technologies Co Ltd.

The mobile division’s earnings contribution shrank to 39 percent of January-September operating profit, on track for the lowest contribution since 2010 and down sharply from 68 percent in 2013. Market share is expected to slip below 20 percent this year, from 24.6 percent in 2013, according to research firm Trefis.

This decline helps explain why long-time mobile chief J.K. Shin recently ceded his day-to-day role to Dongjin Koh, another mobile division veteran.

The firm credits Koh with helping develop its new Samsung Pay mobile payment service and the Knox security platform – two services Samsung says are helping turn things around.

“Samsung has achieved notable progress in recent software and service offerings that have been well received by the market,” the company said in a statement. “Including mobile payment service Samsung Pay, SmartThings IoT platform, mobile security solution Knox, and the Tizen operating system which powers our TVs and wearables.”

Samsung Pay is gaining traction in South Korea and the United States, while Tizen got a push from launch of new smartphones and appliances this year.

The company also said its Silicon Valley-based Global Innovation Centre was seeking to tap into new software-related technologies developed outside the company.

Some investors and analysts say worries of Samsung’s decline are overstated, noting its dominance in memory chips and displays. Its foray into automotive components also has promise, analysts say.

But this is unlikely to revive the explosive earnings growth its smartphones delivered at the beginning of the decade.

What’s needed, according to Chang Sea-jin, a business professor at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, is strong backing for a push into software and services from Samsung Group heir apparent Jay Y. Lee.

“There are signs that Samsung is trying to change and the company is acknowledging its failures,” said Chang. “The company is moving in the right direction, but there is a high probability this is too little, too late.”

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Best Phone Under Rs. 10,000 [January 2016]

Best Phone Under Rs. 10,000 [January 2016]It’s not easy to simply head to a store and buy a smartphone based on a single specification. We always choose the one that falls within our budget and compare its overall performance with others in the same price segment before finally deciding to buy it.

(Also see:  Best Camera Phones Under Rs. 15,000)

Over time, we have seen smartphones often being boasted either for their camera, battery, or any other specification but not as an overall package. This makes it difficult for users to choose which is the best value for money phone and where does it exactly fall when it comes to overall performance.

(Also see:  Smartphones under Rs. 15,000 With Great Battery Life)

It is worth noting that while certain specifications may appear good in theory, they may not necessarily translate into a smartphone with best overall performance. Smartphones with high-end specifications, for example, can often give underwhelming results.

(Also see:  10 Smartphones We Loved in 2015)

Here’s a list of smartphones – all available under Rs. 10,000 – with best overall performance in our reviews, in no particular order. Note that we’ve restricted ourselves to phones launched in roughly the last six months.

Yu Yureka Plus
The Yu Yureka Plus, which was launched back in July this year, has already made it to the list of best camera phones under Rs. 15,000 and is now one of the best smartphones under Rs. 10,000 as well. The smartphone after going through rigorous tests gave impressive results and got an overall rating of 9/10 in all the sections except in design and battery life where it settled for 8/10. Available for as low as Rs. 8,999, the Yureka Plus smartphone runs on Cyanogen OS 12.1.

Yu Yureka Plus

Rs. 9999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Improved display and camera
  • Great performance
  • Customisable Cyanogen OS
  • Excellent value for money
  • Bad
  • Nothing significant considering the price
Read detailed Yu Yureka Plus review
ALSO SEE
Yu Yureka-plus 16gb White
₹ 10,924
Yu Yu Yureka Plus
₹ 11,069
Yu Yureka Plus(Moon Dust Grey, 16 GB)
₹ 11,489

Coolpad Note 3
Coolpad Note 3 is a comparatively a newcomer as it was launched in October this year. The smartphone fared well in our review, scoring a 9/10 rating for value of money. We were impressed by the smartphone’s quick and accurate fingerprint sensor, camera, battery life and overall performance. However, the UI customisations were not up to the mark. The handset is available for Rs. 8,999 from leading online retailers.

Coolpad Note 3

Rs. 8999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Quick and accurate fingerprint sensor
  • Good performance
  • Good camera
  • Good battery life
  • Bad
  • Limited availability
  • Unappealing UI customisations
Read detailed Coolpad Note 3 review
ALSO SEE
NIROSHA Coolpad Note 3 Mobile Car Kit Combo -Tem…
₹ 1,099
NIROSHA Coolpad Note 3 Mobile Car Kit Combo -Mob…
₹ 1,249
Samsung Note 3 Neo Black
₹ 40,500

Xiaomi Redmi 2 Prime
The Redmi 2 Prime by Xiaomi was one of the Chinese tech company’s iconic smartphones this year as it was the first ‘Made in India’ handset. It was launched in August this year and carried the same price tag as Meizu m2 – Rs. 6,999. The Redmi 2 Prime managed to secure a spot for itself in the list mainly because of its 4.7-inch IPS Sharp display with HD resolution and a decent battery life. The camera and design of the handset also got a respectable 7/10 rating in our review.

Xiaomi Redmi 2 Prime

Rs. 6999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Good construction quality
  • Great screen
  • Decent battery life
  • LTE on both SIMs
  • Bad
  • Ships with an outdated version of Android
  • Limited availability
Read detailed Xiaomi Redmi 2 Prime review
ALSO SEE
Accezory Screen Guard For Xiaomi Redmi 2 Prime (…
₹ 1,099
Johra Pack of 3 Ultra Clear HD Screen Scratch Gu…
₹ 1,700
Redmi 2 Prime(Grey, 16 GB)
₹ 6,999

Phicomm Passion 660
Phicomm Passion 660 smartphone received a 9/10 rating for value of money in our review. Launched in June this year in India, the dual-SIM smartphone got a worthy 8/10 rating for its ergonomic design and also fared well when it come to display, performance, and camera. Although the smartphone was launched at a price tag of Rs. 10,999, it can now be purchased for as low as Rs. 8,999 from third-party online retailers.

Phicomm Passion 660

Rs. 10999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Great design and ergonomics
  • Good specification list
  • Decent camera
  • Excellent value for money
  • Bad
  • Inconsistent performance
  • Average battery life
  • UI is underdeveloped and can’t be customised to your needs
Read detailed Phicomm Passion 660 review
ALSO SEE
Lenovo A7000 8 Gb- Black
₹ 8,819
Moto G Turbo Edition(Black, 16 GB)
₹ 12,499
Samsung Galaxy A5 (Midnight Black, 16GB) : Galax…
₹ 17,990

Intex Cloud Flash
Intex Cloud Flash is one of the most recently launched smartphones in the Indian market. The 4G LTE supporting handset was unveiled earlier this month. Although priced at Rs. 9,999 at the time of launch, it can be purchased for as low as Rs. 7,999 from Gadgets360. The smartphone got positive feedback for its vivid display and overall performance by our reviewers. It also got decent 7/10 rating for the design, battery life, and camera.

Intex Cloud Flash

Rs. 9999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Gorilla Glass 3 for back panel
  • Vivid display
  • Good app performance
  • 128GB SD card support
  • Bad
  • Forgettable design
  • Average camera performance
  • Battery life could be better
Read detailed Intex Cloud Flash review
ALSO SEE
Intex Cloud Swing (Black)
₹ 2,699
Intex Cloud Y13(White)
₹ 5,499
Intex Cloud Flash 4G White
₹ 6,999

Disclosure: Gadgets 360 is the official retailer for Intex Cloud Flash

Yu Yunique
Yu Yunique is the most affordable smartphone in our list, and the second entry for Yu, besides the Yu Yureka Plus. The smartphone got 8/10 rating when it came to its software and value for money. The 4G LTE supporting Yunique was launched at Rs. 4,999 in September this year.

Yu Yunique

Rs. 4999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • 4G LTE support
  • Good looks, low weight
  • Good display
  • Near-stock Android
  • Bad
  • Mediocre camera
  • Limited availability
Read detailed Yu Yunique review
ALSO SEE
Yu Yunique 8gb
₹ 6,299
Yu YUNIQUE
₹ 6,398
Yu Yunique True 4G LTE
₹ 6,549

Apart from these, the Moto E (Gen 2) 4G (Review), InFocus M530 (Review), Meizu m2 (Review) are also good overall performers, but have a siginifcant drawback in one of the departments that may stop them from becoming your preferred picks in the crowded budget segment. The Lenovo K3 Note(Review) and Lenovo A7000 (Review) are also solid picks in this price segment, though they break the six-month rule we mentioned earlier and the launch of their successors is around the corner.

 

Which is your favourite phone in the sub-Rs. 10,000 market? Let us know via the comments.

[“Source-Gadgets”]

CES 2016: What to Expect

CES 2016: What to Expect

Every year, tech press from the world over sets up camp in Las Vegas for the Consumer Electronics Show (which has now changed its name to simply CES). The event started in 1967, and in the last decade or so, has become one of the most important events on the tech calendar. By now, it’s significance is (somewhat) on the wane, as the big phone launches have mostly shifted to Mobile World Congress, which takes place about a month later, but you’ll still see big news about TVs, driverless cars, and this year there will almost certainly be a fair sprinkling of companies showing of VR headsets and VR accessories.

The show starts on Wednesday, and will continue till Saturday, but there are already some indications of what you can expect from CES 2016 – apart from news that Netflix will be announcing its India launch at the show.

Lots of cars
Cars are slowly transforming into gadgets – no doubt auto makers are also hoping that smarter cars will be replaced as frequently as other tech buys – and at CES, you’re going to see just about every major car brand have a presence this year.

Ford has long had a presence at the show, and Volkswagen and General Motors will both hold keynote sessions according to the official schedule.

Apart from the big carmakers who will be there to show off their latest and greatest, there are also some new and exciting players in the field. Expect interesting announcements about electric cars from the likes of Faraday Future, which focuses on the development of intelligent electric vehicles. There will also certainly be announcements regarding autonomous vehicles – Google is apparently in talks with Ford to do this, and other carmakers will not want to be left behind.

google_car_124_scrsht.jpgA record 10 automakers will be showing at CES along with at least 115 automotive tech companies, according to the Consumer Technology Association, which organises the show.

It’s still the Year of 4K in CES
Ever since 4K TVs first burst on the scene, there’s been a lot of optimism around the category at CES. Each year, you’ll see a new slate of 4K TVs that are all set to take the world by storm. The UHD (ultra HD) has a press conference scheduled for Monday before CES officially starts, which will also feature speakers from Disney Dreamworks, Sony Pictures, Fox Home Entertainment, Universal Studios, and Warner.

LG_OLED_4K.jpgExpect to see lots of 4K TVs, a smattering of 8K TVs, and a lot of models with a number of “smart” features or visual upgrades that you probably don’t need and can’t really see.

(Also see: LG to Launch webOS 3.0 for Smart TVs at CES 2016)

Netflix also has a big announcement coming up, which will possibly include its plans for India, and YouTube also has an announcement, which could include everything from its content plans, to 4K distribution, and more.

Smarter everything
From smarter televisions to fridges to homes, expect more and more devices to get connected, for better or for worse.

Companies like LG, Samsung, and Apple and Google are all taking a bigger interest in this space and we might see some more progress along this front, but the big issues of standardisation, safety, security, and privacy all remain.

(Also see: LG SmartThinQ Hub for IoT Devices Unveiled Ahead of CES 2016 Launch)

Still, there will be a number of products that are compatible with things such as Google’s Nest Thermostat, and Apple’s HomeKit, which should at least help address the issue of standardisation.

samsung_smartthings.jpg(Also see: Samsung Says 2016 Smart TV Lineup Will Feature SmartThings IoT Support)

Drones, drones everywhere
The US has set rules and deadlines for registration of drones, but that’s not going to cast a dampener over enthusiasm for the category of drones, or unmanned vehicles. Drones are getting more sophisticated, and you can be certain that we’re going to see more of these developments at CES 2016.

amazon_prime_air.jpgFrom four exhibitors in 2014, to 27 in 2016, the amount of space on the show floor for drones has gone up significantly, and now that the technology has evolved, it’s not just going to be quadcopters with cameras either. Tracking, smart sensors, and more intelligent features will drive the category.

VR and wild wearables
CES is always home to the weirdest gadgets, many of which fall in the wearable category, but there will also be a number of cool wearable gadgets that you would probably wish were on sale right now.

Fitness tracking is well defined by now, and expect to see many products on this front, and the same is true for smartwatches. Beyond that, expect to see more virtual reality headsets; Samsung and Oculus are both expected to demonstrate controllers for the Gear VR and the Rift respectively, and we can expect other companies like HTC and Sony also making their presence felt. Expect to see the VR category outside of gaming this year as well, something that hasn’t really been showcased too much so far.

oculus_touch_controller.jpg(Also see: Samsung to Reveal 3 Creative Lab Projects at CES 2016)

There will almost certainly also be developments around Augmented Reality (AR) which has progressed since Google Glass and then Microsoft HoloLens. It’s unlikely that we’ll hear about entirely new solutions, but we might see companies that are working in this space.

This is just a sampling of the kind of things we’re hearing about CES 2016 so far, and of course, there will be a lot more coming once the show officially starts, so stick around to know more.

[“Source-Gadgets”]