Why You Don’t Always Need the Latest Photography Gear

Why You Don't Always Need the Latest Photography Gear

If you’re anything like me, you spend half your time fighting for new business and the other half fighting your urge to spend the money you make from new business on gear. So, for a bit of fun, today I thought I’d share my own personal, self-directed pep talk whenever I feel the urge to splurge.

I see you sitting there. One window open to Fstoppers. Learning about the latest and greatest gear. A second window permanently parked on B&H. Maybe a third open to Amazon.

You must have spent half the morning so far pouring over options. You’ve looked at all the mirrorless cameras. You’ve read every review and memorized the specs. You’ve even spent more time than you’d care to admit reading the gearheads duke it out in the comment sections over everything from the importance of sensor size to whether or not having two card slots magically designates you a professional photographer.

You’ve imagined yourself walking onto set with all these new toys. Naturally, everything from the $2,500 lens to the round, metal dongle whose name you can’t recall but were told was an absolute necessity by your favorite vlogger is in your bag. And of course, you imagine you’ll use every single item in your new artillery, forgetting for a moment that you’ve been getting along just fine without any of it to this point.

As a matter of fact, if you were to take a moment to really think about it, you’d realize that anything deemed cutting edge technology can’t, by definition, be a necessity. Since photography has been around for well over a century, with amazing imagery being created long before you were born, it stands to reason that as much as you want that new LED panel, it would be hard to argue that you objectively need it.

Was Richard Avedon any less of a photographer because he didn’t shoot mirrorless? Did Alfred Hitchcock suck as a director simply because he didn’t have dual-pixel autofocus at his disposal? Of course not.

You don’t become a professional photographer by being able to buy the best equipment. You’re not being hired for your ability to use your credit card. You’re being hired for your ability to create art that no one else can create. You’re being hired for your unique voice. You’re being hired for your experience and because you’ve put in the hard work over the years to now make it all look so easy.

So, maybe all those hours you spent on Google this morning trying to get the definitive answer to whether full frame or APS-C is a superior format wasn’t the best use of your time. Maybe it would have been more useful to have spent the morning cold-calling clients for whom you can put your old equipment to use. Maybe instead of surfing the web, you should have been updating your own website. Maybe instead of having a Twitter duel over the merits of someone else’s work, you should be out creating work of your own.

Being a professional photographer is not about the tools you bring to set inside your designer case. It’s about the creativity and work ethic you have no matter what tool you hold in your hand.

So, next time you find yourself strolling down the digital shopping aisles in search of value, turn your attention instead to building the value of your own product. Instead of looking for a new camera, ask yourself if there’s a way to get more out of the one you already have. Instead of trying to convince yourself that you really need that upgraded lens, ask yourself if there’s a new way you can look at a familiar subject. And next time you subconsciously, maybe not so subconsciously, begin to think that you could really go to “the next level” if only you had better equipment, remind yourself that you can’t buy creativity. You can’t buy experience. You can only work for it.

[“source=TimeOFIndia”]

Five Pieces of Gear That Are Always in My Photography Bag

Image result for Five Pieces of Gear That Are Always in My Photography Bag

With every job or concept we go to shoot, our gear that we take with us is constantly changing. We take our full lighting setup for a day in the studio then we turnaround and pack a separate bag to go shoot in the mountains for that perfect sunset. The gear we take with us is on a constantly turning roundabout between our bags and kits. Through all the madness there does seem to be a few items that are consistently put into every setup. It’s those pieces of gear that work in all scenarios that are invaluable to us and how we work. These are the five items that I won’t leave the house without regardless of what’s on the agenda.

External Battery

When you want to talk about a universally useful item for any photographer it’s hard to leave out an external battery. I don’t think you could find anyone today who hasn’t had a battery die on them at a bad time making their job harder. This gains even more importance if you have a camera that can be charged via USB like the Sony Alpha series of camera. Having this in my bag is great to hook my phone and camera to charge while going between locations in the city or on a hike I can use it to charge my headlamp to make sure I don’t get stranded in the dark. These come in a variety of different charge capacities and ports so make sure the get the one that suits you the best.

Peak Design Capture Pro

I have used this more than any other item in my kit and it has the battle scars to prove it. This is for the people that always want their cameras out of the bag and accessible at all times. Having this on your shoulder strap will ensure that you won’t miss those candid shots that happen for that spilt second. It also provides a secure attachment system to free up both of your hands and keep the camera safe. It uses an Arca Swiss tripod plate so it may not cater to everybody, but if you do decide to implement the Capture Pro I don’t see you being disappointed.

Camera Weather Protection

This one is pretty self-explanatory and it’s a piece of gear that usually goes unnoticed until you realize you don’t have it and need it. Everyone is going to find themselves in bad weather at one point or another and we all know that these shiny high tech cameras don’t go well with water. It could be as simple as keeping a spare grocery bag tucked away in a pocket or getting something specific like a camera sleeve but it could save your wallet in the long run.

Joby GorillaPod

The Joby Gorillapod is the Swiss army knife of camera tripods because it’s not great at anything but can do little bit of everything. Made popular by the vlogging community on YouTube it has since become a mainstay in my camera bag. I have used this in so many different situations from a main tripod on a hike, phone time lapses while shooting locations, putting a LED light up in a tree, and attaching it to my main tripod to hold the separate preamp when recording a video. It’s such a simple and intuitive design and you’ll never catch me anywhere without one.

The Classic Pocket Knife

Just like my great grandfather I will always have a sharp pocket knife on my bag or in my pocket. This is used multiple times a day no matter what I’m doing. From cutting gaff tape to opening those brand new boxes from your favorite camera store, everyone needs a solid pocket knife to take along with them. Along with the external battery this is gear that I’d have on me no matter what career I was involved in. Just be careful to remove them when going through airports or being aware of the state’s laws that you’re visiting as they may have specific restrictions on size, style, etc.

Everyone’s style and work will dictate which pieces of gear end up in their bag. You may use all of these already or have no use for any of them. These are just the pieces that suit what I do and over time these will constantly be evolving to what is continuing to better my workflow. Just find what works best for you and keep shooting!

[“Source-ndtv”]

iPhone 8 May Sport LG-Made Dual Cameras for 3D Photography

iPhone 8 May Sport LG-Made Dual Cameras for 3D Photography

iPhone 8 May Sport LG-Made Dual Cameras for 3D Photography
HIGHLIGHTS
Apple working with LG Innotek to include 3D-enabled dual cameras
Apple utilising Israeli camera technology start-up company LinX for 3D
In 2017, only the iPhone 8 Plus expected to sport 3D cameras
Apple is rumoured to be working with an LG subsidiary to bring 3D photography to iPhone 8. The Korean Economic Daily, citing people familiar with matter, reports that the Cupertino-based giant is working with LG Innotek to add a dual-camera setup to the next iPhone to capture 3D imagery.

The sources claim that Apple is now “studying how to apply its 3D camera technology” into LG Innotek’s smartphone camera. “Since LG Innotek also has its own 3D camera and related technologies, such joint efforts will likely to bear fruit sometime within [the] next year,” the report cites a source close to the situation.

In its attempt to add 3D technology, the company is utilising the Israeli camera technology startup company LinX, which was acquired by Apple in April 2015. To recall, LinX expertise in allowing apps to freely use the 3D information captured by camera on the device to achieve new features such as the ability to refocus an image after it has been captured, measurement of the true dimensions of objects, 3D object modelling and real time background replacement for video calls.
The report adds that LG Innotek is already “exclusively supplying” its dual cameras for iPhone 7 Plus. The report adds that LG Innotek also has experience dealing with 3D cameras as LG launched its first 3D-enabled smartphone, LG Optimus 3D in 2011.
Considering that the all-new dual camera was seen only on the large iPhone 7 Plus, we can expect the 3D tech feature on the iPhone 8 Plus model likely to launch next year. Based on preliminary leaks, Apple is said to ditch the ‘iPhone 7s’ name for next year’s iPhone based on its naming convention and directly name it iPhone 8 considering 2017 will be its tenth anniversary of launch of the original iPhone. An earlier report suggested that Apple is also making efforts to include AR features in an upcoming iPhone camera app.

Tags: Apple, 3D Camera, Cameras, iPhone 8, LinX

 

[“Source-Gadgets”]

25 Things You Need to Start a Photography Business

To open a photography business, you need two things: the skills and the gear. Here's a list of the equipment you need to start a photography business.

Looking to start a photography business? There are plenty of potential photography niches out there for small business owner. But no matter what you plan to actually photograph, there’s some essential equipment you’ll need. Here are 25 things you need to start a photography business.

Equipment You Need to Start a Photography Business

A Good Camera

The first thing you’ll need when it comes to starting a photography business is a good camera. There are plenty of options out there to consider. Some work better in certain situations than others, so you’ll want to do a lot of research on what models will work best for your particular niche.

Tripod

A tripod is also an essential piece of equipment, since it can help you keep your camera steady and allow you to take many pictures of each subject without moving the camera around.

Camera Bag

When you’re transporting your camera from place to place, you need to make sure it’s protected. So invest in a good camera bag that you can use to keep your camera from getting broken or damaged.

Lighting

Lighting is an essential element of any good photograph. And while natural lighting is usually preferred, you’ll also likely want to invest in some studio lighting for when there isn’t sufficient sunlight.

Lenses

There are plenty of different lenses you can use to get different types of images on your camera. So it can be a good idea to invest in some different lenses to improve the quality of your photos.

Backdrops

Depending on what types of photos you plan on taking, you might find it necessary to purchase or create some backdrops that you can use for studio or portrait photographs.

Props

It can also be a good idea to have a variety of different props on hand. The types of props you choose can depend on your niche. For example, if you’re a wedding photographer, you probably won’t want the same props that a pet photographer uses. But having a few different options can be a good idea.

Studio Space

You might also find it necessary to rent or purchase some studio space for your photography business, especially if you plan on having clients travel to you for photos.

Reliable Transportation

Alternatively, you might be more interested in starting a photography business where you travel to clients. In that case, you’ll need some reliable transportation in order to get to and from your shoots.

Smartphone with a Good Camera

While you aren’t likely to use a smartphone or mobile device as your main camera for your photography business, it can still be a good tool. Since social media can be a great tool for sharing photos and behind the scenes shots, it can be useful to have a smartphone that can take decent photos for those purposes.

Editing Software

Once you’ve taken your photos, you’ll also need a software program that lets you edit and fine-tune those images. Programs like Photoshop and Lightroom can be good investments for photographers.

Computer

That also means that you need a computer you can use to actually edit and store those digital photos.

Mobile Photography Apps

In addition, when you take photos on your mobile device, it can be helpful to download some photography apps that you can use to improve your mobile photos.

Social Media Channels

You should also sign up for some social media accounts on platforms like Facebook and Instagram so that you can share your photos and updates with potential customers.

Domain Name

A professional website can also be a helpful tool for a photography business. So purchase a domain name that fits with your business and branding.

Online Portfolio

It can also be beneficial to showcase your photography work on your website or in other locations online. So you’ll need to work to build up a portfolio of images over time.

Business Cards

When you go to jobs or interact with clients, business cards can be a great way to showcase your brand and give potential clients an easy way to get in touch.

Accounting Program

You’ll also need a way to manage and keep track of your finances. So you can invest in a professional accountant or accounting program.

Payment Platform

And you also need a way to collect payments from clients. So you can set up a payment system online or have a mobile payment platform to offer clients.

External Hard Drive

Digital photos can take up a lot of space on your computer. So it can be a good idea to invest in an external hard drive you can use to store all of those large files when not in use.

Business License

It may also be necessary to register your business with your local or state government. Look into any business licenses that might be required for photography businesses in your area.

Insurance

In addition, you might consider purchasing some business insurance or a policy that protects your equipment in case it gets lost or damaged.

Client Contracts

When you get new clients, you’ll likely want to get them to sign a contract so both sides understand what is expected. You can create or find contract templates to use with each new client.

PPA Membership

The Professional Photographers of America is a group that provides resources to professional photographers like contract samples and industry data. You can pay to join in order to take advantage of those resources.

Photo Printer

When printing out proofs or marketing materials, you’ll want to make sure that your photos are high quality. So invest in a good photo printer that will make your images really stand out.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]