U.S. Spends Less as Other Nations Invest More in Education

U.S. spending on education declined from 2010 to 2014. (Hero Images/Getty Images)

The world’s developed nations are placing a big bet on education investments, wagering that highly educated populaces will be needed to fill tomorrow’s jobs, drive healthy economies and generate enough tax receipts to support government services.

Bucking that trend is the United States.

U.S. spending on elementary and high school education declined 3 percent from 2010 to 2014 even as its economy prospered and its student population grew slightly by 1 percent, boiling down to a 4 percent decrease in spending per student. That’s according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s annual report of education indicators, released last week.

Over this same 2010 to 2014 period, education spending, on average, rose 5 percent per student across the 35 countries in the OECD. In some countries it rose at a much higher rate. For example, between 2008 and 2014, education spending rose 76 percent in Turkey, 36 percent in Israel, 32 percent in the United Kingdom and 27 percent in Portugal. For some countries, it’s been a difficult financial sacrifice as their economies stalled after the 2008 financial crisis. To boost education budgets, other areas were slashed. Meanwhile, U.S. local, state and federal governments chose to cut funding for the schoolhouse.

“Overall (U.S.) education spending has been cut quite severely in the last few years,” said Andreas Schleicher, who heads the OECD directorate that issued the report. “That clearly puts constraints on the environment you have for learning.”

How lower spending constrains learning is subtle. Schleicher has pointed out for years that there isn’t a clear relationship between money spent and student outcomes. Some countries that spend far less than the United States on education consistently outshine this country on international tests.
And even with the decline in spending, the United States still spends more per student than most countries. The United States spent $11,319 per elementary school student in 2014, compared with the OECD average of $8,733, and $12,995 educating each high school student, compared with an average of $10,106 per student across the OECD.

The way that high-performing countries achieve more with less money is by spending it differently than the United States does. For example, larger class sizes are common in Asia, with more resources instead spent on improving teaching quality. During the period of U.S. budget cuts to education, there weren’t major changes to how the money was allocated.

“If you simply cut spending with your existing spending choices, you will end with less for less,” said Schleicher, citing school districts in Oklahoma that cut the number of school days to four from five each week.

One big way that the U.S. education system differs from others is in asking teachers to carry a heavy teaching load. U.S. teachers teach close to 1,000 hours a year, compared with 600 hours in Japan and 550 hours in Korea. In these countries, teachers might specialize in one course, such as Algebra I, and teach it only a few periods a day. The rest of their work week is spent on other activities, such as preparing lessons or giving feedback to students.

“In the U.S., teachers have less time for professional development, teacher collaboration, lesson preparation, working with students individually,” said Schleicher. “In other countries, teachers have a lot of time to watch each other’s lessons, design lessons and evaluate lessons.”

By contrast, the U.S. system spends a lot of resources on keeping class sizes relatively small, and hiring more teachers for them.

The OECD’s data echoes what the National Center for Education Statistics in Washington, D.C., has been tracking. It found that education spending for elementary and high school students had fallen for several years in a row from 2009 to 2013, due to a combination of federal, state and local budget cuts. Spending rose a smidgen during

the 2013-14 school year, the most recent year for which data is available, but, after adjusting for inflation, it is still well below the 2009 peak.

Last week’s U.S. Census report showed that middle class incomes are rising. One could argue that the economy is flourishing just fine with less spending on schools. But education is an 18-year, long-term investment, from pre-K through college. It could be that we won’t see our economic prospects smashed from this divestment for many years down the road.

This column was written by Jill Barshay and produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

[“Source-usnews”]

AI-powered filter app Prisma wants to sell its tech to other companies

Prisma, the Russian company best known for its AI-powered photo filters, is shifting to B2B. The company won’t retire its popular app, but says in the future, it will focus on selling machine vision tools to other tech firms.

“We see big opportunities in deep learning and communication,” Prisma CEO and co-founder Alexey Moiseenkov told The Verge. “We feel that a lot of companies need expertise in this area. Even Google is buying companies for computer vision. We can help companies put machine vision in their app because we understand how to implement the technology.” The firm has launched a new website — prismalabs.ai — in order to promote these services.

Prisma will offer a number of off-the-shelf vision tools, including segmentation (separating the foreground of a photo from the background), face mapping, and both scene and object recognition. The company’s expertise is getting these sorts of systems — powered by neural networks — to run locally on-device. This can be a tricky task, but avoiding using the cloud to power these services can result in apps that are faster, more secure, and less of a drain on phone and tablet battery life.

Although Prisma’s painting-inspired filters were all the rage last year (the app itself was released in June 2015), they were soon copied by the likes of Facebook, which might account for the Russian company’s change in direction.

Moiseenkov denies this is the case, and says it wasn’t his intention to compete with bigger social networks. “We never thought we were a competitor of Facebook — we’re a small startup, with a small budget,” he said. But, he says, the popularity of these deep learning filters shows there are plenty of consumer applications for the latest machine vision tech.

Moiseenkov says his company will continue to support the Prisma app, and that it will act as a showcase for the firm’s latest experiments. He says the app still has between 5 million and 10 million monthly active users, most of which are based in the US. The company also started experimenting with selling sponsored filters on its main app last year, and says it will continue to do so. It also launched an app for turning selfies into chat stickers.

There have been rumors that Prisma would get bought out by a bigger company. Moiseenkov visited Facebook’s headquarters last year, and the US tech giant has made similar acquisitions in the past — buying Belarus facial filter startup MSQRD in March 2016. When asked if the company would consider a similar deal, co-founder Aram Airapetyan replied over email: “We want to go on doing what we do and what we can do best. The whole team is super motivated and passionately committed to what we do

Source:-theverge

LSR’s ‘admin gazebo’ and five other things I love about my college

A welcome notice put up for LSR’s freshers by the mathematics department

On Wednesday, July 19, I was admitted to Lady Shri Ram College for Women for the BSc (Hons) mathematics programme. Though I attended the college orientation programme and the department orientation on July 20 and 21 and know I am in for the long haul (three years) here, those two days were enough for me to fall in love with a few things in my new college.

1.Tradition

The college orientation was held on July 20, with guest speakers including notable alumnae of LSR. Thereafter, students from each department headed towards various spots on campus to plant saplings as part of the LSR tradition. My mathematics department planted three saplings in the green space adjoining the admin office. It was officially our first exercise as a department.

The admin gazebo – Yes, that definitely looks like a cool spot to chill out in. (Sourced)

2.Cool hangouts

It was during the planting of the saplings that I saw the admin gazebo in front of the admin office. As the name suggests, the shaded sitting area looked like a potential centre for student activity.I knew right away that I’d be spending a lot of time here.

3.Lush green campus

It’s a lush green campus with trees standing tall against red brick buildings and shaded walkways leading to the college building. Even the view from our class corridor is breathtakingly beautiful. I have learnt that the gardeners are given due credit for their efforts.

Trees, manicured lawns add to the beauty of this campus. (Sourced)

4. Easy access to information

As I walked through the college halls, my seniors’ dedication and creativity was evident. The notice boards designed by various societies and departments were meticulously structured and packed with information. The mathematics department’s notice board had details of activities conducted all year round.

The colourful and nicely done up notice boards in LSR. (Sourced)

5.Friendly seniors

Our seniors ensured that we felt at ease despite our nerves. Exhilarating performances by various societies and helpful tips during department orientations were all part of the package. It wasn’t based purely on a sense of duty, but reflected our seniors’ genuine care and concern for us.

6.An enabling environment

Besides the admittedly excellent faculty and academic rigour, societies help in the all-round development of students. While the former fuels a student’s inquisitive streak, the latter equips her with skills ranging from engagement to management. By the end of it all, an ELSA (referred to students of LSR) is sure to have carved a niche for herself.

Through the course of my studies here I look forward to growing into someone more confident, knowledgeable and kind; someone who has the power to change her surroundings, for the better.

 

 

[“source-hindustantimes”]

Top Gear America’s first trailer looks exactly like every other Top Gear

Image result for Top,Gear,America’s,first,trailer,looks,exactly,like,every,other,Top,GearThe first trailer for BBC America’s rebooted American Top Gear has finally been released. It’s short, but we do get a glimpse at the new crew driving the Acura NSX, a Lamborghini Huracán Spyder, and a few other wild rides. The series premieres on July 30th at 8PM ET.

Top Gear America’s first season will consist of eight hour-long episodes. It stars eternal “that guy” William Fichtner (The Dark Knight, Contact, Armageddon), professional drag racer Antron Brown, and British automotive journalist Tom Ford. From the trailer, it looks just like other versions of Top Gear, meaning this show’s not going to reinvent the format of “three dudes + fast cars + antics = TV show.”

That means it will probably be a decent show — if it ain’t broke, why wrench it? — but I’d be surprised if Top Gear America surprises me, because all the different permutations of Top Gear never seem to stray from that equation.

The Top Gear that most people think about — which itself is a reboot of a show from the 1970s — is still airing new episodes in the UK on BBC. It’s currently hosted by Friends star Matt LeBlanc, car enthusiast and reviewer Chris Harris, and automotive journalist Rory Reid. They took over hosting duties from the most well-known Top Gear trio of Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond, and James May.

The LeBlanc-led version of the show spent one season in transition rotating hosts from a cast of about eight, but that really, truly didn’t work out. The current hosts emerged from that wreckage and have developed a pretty good chemistry, which is a minor miracle, but the show’s format is still airtight. There’s a few serious segments about specific cars, a celebrity guest, and typically one goofier segment. BBC essentially pulled the idol-for-bag-of-sand switch from Indiana Jones here — it just happened to spill a lot more sand than the fictional archeologist.

The trio of Clarkson, Hammond, and May now have their own show on Amazon called The Grand Tour, which is headed into a second season, and follows a similar (but slightly remixed) format. They split off from the BBC show after Clarkson was fired for attacking a producer. The show leans even harder into the personalities of its hosts, which is a bold move considering Clarkson’s brutish behavior kept the hosts’ Top Gear tenure in the crosshairs for years.

Top Gear America isn’t the first attempt to bring Top Gear to the US. A&E Networks recently aired five seasons of a show called Top Gear USA on the History Channel, but that was canceled last summer. Its hosts — median Adam Ferrara, Rallycross driver Tanner Foust, and NASCAR personality Rutledge Wood — had developed a pretty good rapport by the end of the run, but it seemed to survive so long almost because of, not in spite of, its obscurity. It was as inoffensive as Top Gear gets.

The point is, we’ve seen Top Gear with all sorts of different (male) hosts, but it’s always still just Top Gear. I don’t know what Top Gear could or even should evolve into (how about more women hosting!), but it is exhausting that the BBC keeps trying to arrive at a different answer by running the same equation. Of course, looking at how well reboots and sequels do for Hollywood, the video game industry, and even modern television, I understand why the BBC keeps trying.

[“Source-theverge”]