TRAI, BEREC Sign Memorandum on Preserving, Promoting Net Neutrality Rules

TRAI, BEREC Sign Memorandum on Preserving, Promoting Net Neutrality Rules

Left to Right: BEREC OAM Laszlo Igneczi, TRAI Chairman R.S. Sharma, BEREC Chair Johannes Gungl

HIGHLIGHTS

  • TRAI and BEREC met on Thursday in Poland
  • The two announced their common understanding of net neutrality
  • They also collaborated to develop effective regulations

Telecom regulators from India and the European Union (EU) met this week to announce their common understanding of the “building blocks of net neutralityrules”, and their intention to collaborate on regulations. Representatives of Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) and the Body of European Regulators for Electronics Communication (BEREC) on Thursday in Sopat, Poland signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) to “advocate for effective electronics communications regulation.” The two also released a “Joint Statement for the Open Internet”, that defined the heretofore mentioned building blocks.

The MoU was said to show the willingness of both sides to develop regular exchanges regarding the implementation and preservation of net neutrality rules. The regulators said they intend to “promote competitive markets, technological innovation, and value for consumers.”

In their joint statement, TRAI and BEREC listed what they consider to be the foundation of net neutrality rules, common to current frameworks of both India and EU. These included the enforcement of end users’ rights to send or receive information; the equal treatment of traffic; provision for reasonable traffic management if transparent and non-discriminatory; provision for commercial practices such as zero rating if they complement competition and promote an open Internet, and finally, the users’ right to detailed information on Internet providers, prices, as well as current traffic management measures.

The regulators may impose additional requirements allowed by their respective legislative frameworks on top of these building blocks, the joint statement added. Representing the two bodies were TRAI Chairman Dr. Ram Sewak Sharma and BEREC Chair Johannes Gungl. Commenting on the MoU, Gungl said, “Net neutrality is a vital principal and an open internet crucial for people around the globe. We are very happy to have TRAI as a partner to ensure a univocal protection of net neutrality principles for internet access services.”

R.S. Sharma said, “We consider that the internet will continue to be an enabler of growth and innovation for countries like India who can use technology to leapfrog to the next stage of development. Therefore, it is important that the internet is kept as an open and non-discriminatory platform. Our MoU with BEREC gives us an opportunity to not only work closely together in areas like net neutrality, but also to collaborate in areas where the EU has adopted a very effective regulatory framework like consumer protection, broadband development and promotion of NGA rollout.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Key Insights on the Online Tutoring Services Market in the US| Technavio

Image result for Key Insights on the Online Tutoring Services Market in the US| Technavio

LONDON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–May 25, 2018– projects the to post a CAGR of more than 9% during the forecast period. The increase in tutoring support for test preparation services is a key driver, which is expected to impact market growth through 2018-2022.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180525005427/en/

Technavio has published a new market research report on the online tutoring services market in the US from 2018-2022. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The US education system is merit-based, wherein the student population must write at least two competitive exams during their education tenure. This increased the demand for test preparation services. There is a direct relation between the changes in exam structure and the demand for test preparation courses and materials.

This report is available at a USD 1,000 discount for a limited time only:

Save more with Technavio. Buy2 reports and get the third for FREE:

In this report, Technavio highlights the growing customization of tutoring services as one of the key emerging trends to drive the online tutoring services market in the US:

Growing customization of tutoring services

Personalized training is a significant development in the online tutoring services market in the US. Vendors are increasingly trying to tailor and align courses to the needs of the students. A variety of learning tools are available for differentiated instruction. The application of analytics is helping the online tutoring service providers to design content based on the insights gained from analytics.

According to a senior analyst at Technavio for research , “The need to keep students engaged and provide them with specialized training will lead to the growth of the market. The use of analytics will enable content designers to understand learning patterns and create content to provide effectively train and mentor students. It also helps provide real-time assessment of student performance.”

Looking for more information on this market?

Technavio’s sample reports are free of charge and contain multiple sections of the report such as the market size and forecast, drivers, challenges, trends, and more.

Market segmentation and analysis through 2022

This market research report segments the by end-user (higher education institutes and K-12 schools) and product (test preparation service and subject tutoring service).

The higher education institutes segment dominated the market in 2017, accounting for close to 66% of the market in 2017. The market share of this segment is expected to decrease by close to 5% over the forecast period in favor of the K-12 schools segment.

In 2017, test preparation service accounted for more than 56% of the market. The market share of this segment is expected to increase by a further 3% by 2022. The online tutoring services market in the US is growing because of the failure of the academic system to cope with the needs of the students.

About Technavio

is a leading global technology research and advisory company. Their research and analysis focuses on emerging market trends and provides actionable insights to help businesses identify market opportunities and develop effective strategies to optimize their market positions.

With over 500 specialized analysts, Technavio’s report library consists of more than 10,000 reports and counting, covering 800 technologies, spanning across 50 countries. Their client base consists of enterprises of all sizes, including more than 100 Fortune 500 companies. This growing client base relies on Technavio’s comprehensive coverage, extensive research, and actionable market insights to identify opportunities in existing and potential markets and assess their competitive positions within changing market scenarios.

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[“Source-wlns”]

Legislators Are Missing the Point on Facebook

Legislators Are Missing the Point on Facebook

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The real issue: How our data get used
  • Facebook has been quite open and obvious about their skeevy practices
  • America needs a smarter conversation about data usage

I’m getting increasingly baffled and disappointed by the scandal-cum-congressional-ragefest surrounding Facebook. Instead of piling on Mark Zuckerberg or worrying about who has our personal data, legislators should focus on the real issue: How our data get used.

Let’s start with some ground truths that seem to be getting lost:

– Cambridge Analytica, the company the hoovered up a bunch of data on Facebook users, isn’t actually much of a threat. Yes, it’s super sleazy, but it mostly sucked at manipulating voters.

– Lots of other companies – maybe hundreds! – and “malicious actors” also collect our data. They’re much more likely to be selling our personal information to fraudsters.

– We should not expect Zuckerberg to follow through on any promises. He’s tried to make nice before to little actual effect. He has a lot of conflicts and he’s kind of a naive robot.

– Even if Zuckerberg was a saint and didn’t care a whit about profit, chances are social media is still just plain bad for democracy.

Politicians don’t want to admit that they don’t understand technology well enough to come up with reasonable regulations. Now that democracy itself might be at stake, they need someone to blame. Enter Zuckerberg, the perfect punching bag. Problem is, he likely did nothing illegal, and Facebook has been relatively open and obvious about their skeevy business practices. For the most part, nobody really cared until now. (If that sounds cynical, I’ll add: Democrats didn’t care until it looked like Republican campaigns were catching up to or even surpassing them with big data techniques.)

What America really needs is a smarter conversation about data usage. It starts with a recognition: Our data are already out there. Even if we haven’t spilled our own personal information, someone has. We’re all exposed. Companies have the data and techniques they need to predict all sorts of things about us: our voting behaviour, our consumer behaviour, our health, our financial futures. That’s a lot of power being wielded by people who shouldn’t be trusted.

If politicians want to create rules, they should start by narrowly addressing the worst possible uses for our personal information – the ways it can be used to deny people job opportunities, limit access to health insurance, set interest rates on loans and decide who gets out of jail. Essentially any bureaucratic decision can now be made by algorithm, and those algorithms need interrogating way more than Zuckerberg does.

To that end, I propose a Data Bill of Rights. It should have two components: The first would specify how much control we may exert over how our individual information is used for important decisions, and the second would introduce federally enforced rules on how algorithms should be monitored more generally.

The individual rights could be loosely based on the Fair Credit Reporting Act, which allows us to access the data employed to generate our credit scores. Most scoring algorithms work in a similar way, so this would be a reasonable model. As regards aggregate data, we should have the right to know what information algorithms are using to make decisions about us. We should be able to correct the record if it’s wrong, and to appeal scores if we think they’re unfair. We should be entitled to know how the algorithms work: How, for example, will my score change if I miss an electricity bill? This is a bit more than FCRA now provides.

Further, Congress should create a new regulator – along the lines of the Food and Drug Administration – to ensure that every important, large-scale algorithm can pass three basic tests (Disclosure: I have a company that offers such algorithm-auditing services.):

– It’s at least as good as the human process it replaces (this will force companies to admit how they define “success” for an algorithm, which far too often simply translates into profit),

– It doesn’t disproportionately fail when dealing with protected classes (as facial recognition software is known to do);

– It doesn’t cause crazy negative externalities, such as destroying people’s trust in facts or sense of self-worth. Companies wielding algorithms that could have such long-term negative effects would be monitored by third parties who aren’t beholden to shareholders.

I’m no policy wonk, and I recognise that it’s not easy to grasp the magnitude and complexity of the mess we’re in. A few simple rules, though, could go a long way toward limiting the damage.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

HC seeks Centre, CBI response on reinvestigation of SSC exam leaks

A plea field by several job aspirants alleged that the officials of the SSC, private vendors and others were a part of the syndicate selling seats for Rs 10-20 lakh per candidate.

The Delhi High Court on Thursday asked the Centre and CBI to file their response on a plea by several job aspirants seeking reinvestigation into the cases of Staff Selection Commission (SSC) paper leaks.

Justice S P Garg listed the matter for July 26 on the plea filed by 44 people.

The job aspirants also sought setting up of an enquiry commission headed by a retired judge of the Supreme Court or the High Court in connection with the repeated offences such as cheating in the SSC exam.

The petition said that multiple FIRs are lodged every year over leaks of question papers and several persons are arrested for allegedly aiding the aspirants to cheat for money, but in none of the cases, the probe agencies have been able to bust the racket and arrest the main persons involved in the organised crime.

Advocate Anurag Ahluwali accepted the notice for the Central government and the SSC, while advocate Narender Mann did so on behalf of the CBI.

The plea claimed that the syndicate was still operating as officials from the department of SSC have never been arrested. It alleged that the probe agencies have failed to identify the source of the leaks and the main perpetrators of the crime were still untouched.

“The modus operandi of the syndicate is supported by ultra-modern technologies and the commission of the crime gets detected at very few places as the local police agencies are not well equipped technologically,” it said.

The plea alleged that the officials of the SSC, private vendors and others were a part of the syndicate selling seats for Rs 10-20 lakh per candidate.

The plea said that the exams are conducted for sensitive posts such as inspector, sub-inspector, constables of para-military organisations, National Investigating Agency, Central Bureau of Investigation, Intelligence Bureau, Income Tax, Central Excise, Delhi Police and various coveted post across the government ministries.

“These posts are so sensitive in nature that selection of a tainted candidate can jeopardise the national security of the country,” it said, adding that the future of many deserving candidates has been ruined because of the inaction of authorities to stop the offences since 2013.

The Supreme Court had in March this year dismissed a PIL seeking a CBI probe into the SSC paper leak case after the Centre informed it that the probe agency has already started investigating it.

Amid protests over alleged paper leak, the SSC had recently recommended a CBI probe into it.

 

[“source=hindustantimes”]