Samsung to launch Galaxy A70 next week; Galaxy A80 launch in May

Samsung to launch Galaxy A70 next week; Galaxy A80 launch in May

Ahead of the launch of Samsung Galaxy A70 next week, Samsung has said that it will launch Galaxy A80 in the month of May. Samsung Galaxy A70 will be priced in the range of Rs 25,000 to Rs 30,000. On the other hand, the Galaxy A80 could fall in the price bracket of Rs 45,000 to Rs 50,000.

“We will launch the Galaxy A70 in India next week in the Rs 25,000 – Rs 30,000 bracket and the Galaxy A80 in the Rs 45,000 – Rs 50,000 bracket in May,” Ranjivjit Singh, Chief Marketing Officer and Senior Vice President, Samsung India, told IANS.

Samsung is looking to challenge the Chinese budget smartphone makers like Xiaomi, Oppo, OnePlus in India with its Galaxy A-series smartphones. The South Korean electronics major is targeting $4 billion in revenues from its Galaxy “A” series of phones in 2019.

As far as specifications of Samsung Galaxy A70 are concerned, the phone features 6.7-inch Infinity-U display. It is powered by a 2.0 Ghz octa-core chipset paired with 6GB or 8GB of RAM and 128GB of internal storage, which is expandable up to 512GB via a microSD card. The Galaxy A70 runs on  the One UI based on Android Pie.

The Optics of Galaxy A70 includes a triple camera setup with a 32MP primary camera with f/1.7 aperture, an 8MP ultra wide-angle camera and a 5MP depth camera. For the selfies, Galaxy A70 sports a 32MP camera with f/2.0 aperture. The Galaxy A70 also houses a large 4,500mAh battery with the support for 25W fast charging over USB Type-C.

Samsung is also planning to unveil Galaxy A80 next month in May. The Galaxy A80 comes with a refreshing new design and has a sliding and rotating camera setup. The Galaxy A80 will be powered by Qualcomm’s brand-new Snapdragon 730G SoC, which is built on 8nm manufacturing process. As far as specifications are concerned, the Samsung Galaxy A80 has a 6.7-inch full-HD+ (1080×2400 pixels) Super AMOLED display or the “New Infinity Display”.

Samsung Galaxy A80 comes with 8GB of RAM and 128GB of onboard storage which cannot be expanded using a microSD. The phone runs on Android 9 Pie with Samsung’s One UI. The Galaxy A80 also comes with 3,700mAh battery with Super Fast Charging support.

As far as the optics is concerned, the Galaxy A80 comes with a triple camera setup that includes a huge 48MP primary sensor, an 8-MP secondary sensor with an ultra-wide-angle f/2.2 lens, and a 3D depth camera. The camera also comes with several modes like super slow mo, live focus for photos as well as videos and hyperlapse. For the front camera, there is also the AR Emojis feature.

[“source=businesstoday”]

Watch out: Your private health app data may impact your credit report

Image result for Watch out: Your private health app data may impact your credit reportIt’s a sad fact of our late capitalist world that data is one of the hottest currencies. Every move you make online–and sometimes off, too!–is likely being tracked in some way and then sold to the highest bidder. New research shows that even health apps, which often store users’ most personal information, are also sharing the data they collect. To make matters worse, for many of these programs, it’s simply impossible to opt out.

The study was performed by a team of researchers in Australia, Canada, and the U.S., reports Gizmodo. They decided to download 24 of the most popular health-related apps on Android. For each app, the team made four fake profiles and each used the programs 14 times. On the 15th time, they slightly changed the information they provided to the apps and tracked if the network traffic changed. This way, the researchers were able to see if the apps shared the data change, as well as where they shared it.

The findings were depressing. Writes Gizmodo:

Overall, they found 79 percent of apps, including [popular apps Medscape, Ada, and Drugs.com], shared at least some user data outside of the app itself. While some of the unique entities that had access to the data used it to improve the app’s functions, like maintaining the cloud where data could be uploaded by users or handling error reports, others were likely using it to create tailored advertisements for other companies. When looking at these third parties, the researchers also found that many marketed their ability to bundle together user data and share it with fourth-party companies even further removed from the health industry, such as credit reporting agencies. And while this data is said to be made completely anonymous and de-identified, the authors found that certain companies were given enough data to easily piece together the identity of users if they wanted to.

Essentially, most of the apps were sharing the data users’ input in some capacity, and often that information was shared once again with another entity. Sometimes the data would be used for advertising, other times for something related to credit reporting. (According to the study, only one credit reporting agency had an agreement with a third party: Equifax. Of course, it’s not terribly comforting that the company had one of the largest hacks in recent memory.)


 

The sad part is that these findings aren’t terribly surprising, nor are they illegal. Most apps broker user data in some capacity. Usually they use it for marketing and advertising, yet, as the credit report agency example shows, the data could be shared with truly anyone for myriad purposes. While third parties claim to anonymize the data, it’s been repeatedly proven that it can easily be re-identified.

As for disclosure, the companies behind these apps likely tell users in legalese that they share data with third parties. Every app has a privacy policy, but they are usually designed so that people glaze over the words and reflexively click “accept.” Meanwhile, this study found that all of the apps that shared data made it impossible to opt out.

The two real lessons from studies like these are that users of digital health programs need to be vigilant with the programs they use. It’s possible to protect your data, but it takes a lot of homework. But most of all, there needs to be a heightened call to protect consumers from these predatory practices.

Today, we dig deeper into your health privacy as part of our series The Privacy Divide, and find that what you don’t know about your health data could make you sick.

[“source=fastcompany”]

Listening to music may not help you enhance creative performance

music-headphones2_ThinkstockPhotosLONDON: Listening to background music “significantly impairs” people’s ability to complete tasks testing verbal creativity, say scientists who challenge the myth that music makes us more creative.

Psychologists from University of Gavle in Sweden, University of Central Lancashire and Lancaster Universityin the UK investigated the impact of background music on performance by presenting people with verbal insight problems that are believed to tap creativity.

They found that background music “significantly impaired” people’s ability to complete tasks testing verbal creativity – but there was no effect for background library noise.

For example, a participant was shown three words (eg dress, dial, flower), with the requirement being to find a single associated word (in this case “Sun”) that can be combined to make a common word or phrase (ie sundress, sundial and sunflower).

Listening to music may not help you enhance creative performance

The researchers used three experiments involving verbal tasks in either a quiet environment or while exposed to background music with unfamiliar lyrics, instrumental music without lyrics, or music with familiar lyrics.

“We found strong evidence of impaired performance when playing background music in comparison to quiet background conditions,” said Neil McLatchie of Lancaster University.

Researchers suggest this may be because music disrupts verbal working memory.

The third experiment – exposure to music with familiar lyrics – impaired creativity regardless of whether the music also boosted mood, induced a positive mood, was liked by the participants, or whether participants typically studied in the presence of music.

Listening to music may not help you enhance creative performance

However, there was no significant difference in performance of the verbal tasks between the quiet and library noise conditions.

Researchers said this is because library noise is a “steady state” environment which is not as disruptive.

The findings challenge the popular view that music enhances creativity, and instead demonstrate that music, regardless of the presence of semantic content, consistently disrupts creative performance in insight problem solving, researchers said.

[“source=economictimes.indiatimes”]

Mobile apps may or may not be collecting your child’s data—but here’s why you should assume they are

This week two democratic senators are calling on federal regulators to investigate if children’s apps are tracking their data.

Senators Edward Markey of Massachusetts and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut sent a letter on Wednesday to the Federal Trade Commission, writing they are concerned that numerous apps are potentially violating the law.

Without explicit parental consent, it is illegal to collect data on children under the age of 13 according to the Children Online Privacy Protection Act, which went into effect in 2000.

This comes after last month when the New Mexico Attorney Generalsued the maker of app Fun Kid Racing, as well as the online ad businesses run by Google, Twitter and three other companies.

The suit accused the companies of violating the law, and that Google misled parents by allowing apps to remain in its Google Play store children’s section after it was notified by researchers that thousands of apps may be tracking young children.

“The problem is this – we don’t know where the onus lies,” New York Times reporter Edmund Lee told CNBC’s “On the Money” in an interview.

Lee says the law isn’t clear on whether it should be the platform such as Google or Apple to make sure the apps in their stores are complying with the law, whether it’s up to the game developer or if it should be up to the third party data firm tracking the data.

“So there’s a whole system in place that everyone keeps passing the buck and there’s no case law yet,” says Lee. “Even the legislation – it’s not entirely clear who is ultimately responsible.”

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So what should a parent do if they are concerned their child is being tracked?

Lee says, “You should just assume it’s going to happen you should assume you’re going to be tracked.”

“Right now it’s the ‘Wild West’ there are very few protections, few sort of places of enforcement around it, and that’s why it’s hard as a parent and as a kid to navigate,” he added.

However, Lee notes most of these are harmless games, and the tracking data is used for advertising purposes, which is how these companies make money.

For parents worried about their child’s privacy – Lee says he tells his own daughter to keep her communication online only with people she knows.

“You’re not going to be able to look and know every single piece of data that’s being floated out there until there’s legislation and case law in place. But in the meantime make sure you know who your kid is talking to and it shouldn’t be strangers and it shouldn’t be someone they just met online.”

[“source=businessinsider”]