Research Industry Leaders Eileen Campbell, Andrew Reid and Jennifer Reid Launch Reid Campbell Group and Announce First Two Holdings — Rival Technologies and Reach3 Insights

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CHICAGO, June 19, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Eileen Campbell (former Global CEO of Millward Brown) and siblings Jennifer and Andrew Reid (Founder of Vision Critical) have partnered to create Reid Campbell Group, a new holding company that serves as a launch pad for innovation in consumer insights. The newly formed group also announces the launch of their first two companies; insight technology innovator, Rival Technologies and full-service research agency, Reach3 Insights. Reid Campbell Group, Rival Technologies and Reach3 Insights are poised to lead the next wave of market research innovation for the world’s top brands.

Using conversational, mobile-first techniques that consumers use in their everyday lives, Reid Campbell Group companies are particularly focused on integrating the opinions of young and multicultural consumers whose voices often go unheard in traditional market research.

“Research and insights are so fundamental to business success, yet the function is often saddled with a stodgy reputation because we’ve been a bit slow to evolve,” states Founding Partner & Executive Chair of Reid Campbell Group Eileen Campbell. “We need to reflect the rapidly changing communication methods consumers use today to deliver meaningful business results. We are determined to do just that.”

Reid Campbell Group’s first two companies set the tone for the changes to come. Rival Technologies, led by the Founder of Vision Critical and VC Labs, Andrew Reid, is North America’s first company to use conversational chat to gather valuable insights from our ‘Mobile First’ generation. Over time, this technology offers a more personal and consistent way to connect with customers than traditional “ask and answer” questionnaires.

“The more we can mirror human conversations in our contact with customers, the more likely it is that they will provide deep and honest insights,” comments Founding Partner of Reid Campbell Group & CEO of Rival Technologies Andrew Reid.

Reach3 Insights is led by one of North America’s top consumer market researchers, former Ipsos and Vision Critical executive Matt Kleinschmit. Kleinschmit is known for designing and implementing strategic insight platforms for some of the world’s most formidable brands. Accelerated by Rival’s modern technology, Reach3 works on behalf of brands to capture ongoing insights using conversational and other immersive experiences, intelligent analytics and game-changing, storytelling deliverables.

“At the dawn of the millennium, marketing research moved online. In the 2000’s it evolved into online communities & interactive tools. We believe that we are now entering the 3rd wave of modern marketing research, characterized by agile, organic and immersive conversational insights captured at scale through the mediums used by the digital generation,” explains Reach3 Insights Founder & CEO Matt Kleinschmit.

Both Rival Technologies and Reach3 Insights launch with an impressive list of early adopter customers, including Warner Brothers and the NFL. Rival Technologies will continue to enhance their technology and platform to meet expanding client needs, with a full slate of additional enhancements in development. Reach3 Insights will continue to scale to meet the needs of global clients who are seeking more immersive and engaging insights solutions to drive business success.

About Reid Campbell Group
A unique holding company driven to reinvent the staid consumer insights industry, Reid Campbell Group represents the partnership of global insights icons Eileen Campbell (former Global CEO of Millward Brown) and siblings Jennifer and Andrew Reid (Founder and Former President of Vision Critical). The cornerstones of Reid Campbell Group are two companies; Rival Technologies and Reach3 Insights.

Andrew Reid serves as the CEO of Rival Technologies, rethinking research with voice, video, and chat solutions optimized for the ‘Mobile First’ generation. Reach3 Insights, led by one of North America’s top consumer market researchers and former Ipsos and Vision Critical executive, Matt Kleinschmit, is an insights-based consulting agency that leverages Rival’s proprietary technology and designs intelligent research methods to deliver insights at the scale and pace of 21st-century brands. For more information visit: www.reidcampbellgroup.com, www.rivaltech.com or www.reach3insights.com

[“Source-globenewswire”]

Global insights consultancy Kantar locates its first advanced analytics hub in region in Singapore

EDB & Kantar - LR, Hernan Sanchez, Tim Kelsall, Kelvin Wong.png

WPP-OWNED global insights consultancy, Kantar, is partnering the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB) to launch its first research and development hub in Asia.

The Brand Growth Lab will focus on advanced analytics and use Big Data, artificial intelligence and machine learning to help companies grow their brands. It will have a strong innovation mandate and aims to transform unstructured data into insights that drive customer-centric decision-making and sustainable growth for companies.

In addition to the lab’s innovation mandate, the three-year collaboration between Kantar and the EDB also includes the hiring of data scientists and business designers, thus developing a strong pipeline of Singapore-based talent and expertise in this area.

The creation of the lab follows the establishment of similar analytics labs in London and Frankfurt, and this year’s launch of the Professional Services Industry Transformation Map (ITM), a roadmap that seeks to to develop Singapore into a global leader in the professional services industry.

Said Hernan Sanchez, Kantar Brand Growth Lab’s managing director: “Brands no longer have to rely on hunches, but can instead substantiate their decisions based on intelligent analytics.”

Kelvin Wong, EDB’s assistant managing director, said: “We are delighted that Kantar has chosen Singapore to locate its first advanced analytics hub in Asia. Singapore’s professional services sector is growing, and Kantar’s decision is testament to this.”

[“Source-businesstimes”]

Continuous Testing Insights from 2018 DevTest Research

Continuous Testing Insights

The year is far from over, but there already several interesting DevTest surveys worth your attention. These studies don’t just quantify the obvious; they actually report some unexpected findings regarding how far and how fast we’re advancing, and offer some very specific advice on what’s needed to improve.

We strongly recommend that you spend some time reading all three of these surveys in their entirety. However, in case you’re short on time (or impatient … or both), we wanted to highlight the findings that are most pertinent for readers practicing or researching Continuous Testing.

 

Sauce Labs – Testing Trends for 2018: A Survey of Development and Testing Professionals

 

[Read the complete report]

 

2018 marks the fourth annual “Testing Trends” report, which is based on a global survey of more than 1,000 technology professionals responsible for developing and testing web and mobile applications.

 

Key findings in terms of testing include:

 

  • 87 percent report that management supports test automation initiatives.
  • 45 percent expect to increase spending on test automation in 2018 (55 percent at large companies).
  • The number of respondents with high levels of test automation dropped to 28 percent in 2018 from 32 percent in 2017 .
  • The release cadence is actually slowing, with hourly deployments dropping to 5 percent from 14 percent and daily deployments dropping to 27 percent from 34 percent.

 

In other words, everyone recognizes the value of test automation and most companies are willing to invest in it. However, test automation rates are actually decreasing, while Agile and DevOps adoption are steadily increasing. In the 2017 report, test automation rates increased slightly, and delivery speed also increased slightly. The 2018 reported a similar correlation: Test automation rates decreased, and the release cadence slowed down.

 

GitLab – 2018 Global Developer Report

 

[Read the complete report]

 

This expansive survey polled 5,296 software professionals from around the world. The majority of respondents were software developers or engineers who worked for small- to medium-sized businesses (SMB) in the hardware, services and SaaS industries.

 

Testing wasn’t a common topic in this development-focused research, but it did earn a prominent spot in the report. Testing was the No. 1 response to the question, “Where in the development process do you encounter the most delays?” A dubious honor—but not a surprising one. Last year’s DevOps Review polled an entirely different audience and came up with the exact same finding.

 

VersionOne – 12th Annual State of Agile Report

 

[Read the complete report]

 

The 12th edition of the world’s longest-running Agile study found that while 97 percent of the 1,492 respondents’ organizations are practicing Agile, 84 percent report that their Agile adoption is not yet mature.

 

Respondents feel strongly that two testing-related items would help them increase process maturity across both Agile and DevOps:

 

  • 83 percent want end-to-end traceability from business initiative through development, test and deployment.
  • 82 percent want better identification and measurement of risk prior to deployment.

 

Respondents also reported a relatively high level of adoption of development testing and “shift left” testing techniques. Adoption levels were reported at:

 

  • Unit testing – 75 percent.
  • Coding standards – 64 percent.
  • Pair programming – 36 percent.
  • TDD – 35 percent.
  • BDD – 17 percent.

 

Testers might also be interested in the survey’s feedback on Agile management tools. Usage rates were reported at:

 

  • Atlassian Jira – 58 percent.
  • VersionOne – 20 percent.
  • Microsoft TFS – 21 percent.
  • HP (now Micro Focus) Quality Center / ALM – 14 percent.

 

The most highly recommended tools were VersionOne, Jira and CA Agile Central. HP Agile Manager, Hansoft and HP Quality Center /ALM were the least likely to be recommended.

[“Source-devops”]

Helping close divisions in the US: Insights from the American Well-Being Project

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Editor’s Note:The American Well-Being Project is a joint initiative between scholars at the Brookings Institution and Washington University in St. Louis.

Issues of despair in the United States are diverse, widespread, and politically fueled, ranging from concentrated poverty and crime in cities to the opioid crisis plaguing poor rural towns. Local leaders and actors in disconnected communities need public policy resources and inputs beyond what has traditionally been available.

Scholars at Brookings and Washington University in St. Louis are working together to analyze the issues underlying America’s disaffection and divisions in order to provide policy ideas for a better, more inclusive future. Through on-the-ground community research in Missouri—a microcosm of America’s problems—as well as the application of ongoing policy research, we hope to develop approaches that can tackle factors like lack of access to health care, scarcity of low-skilled jobs, weak education systems, and hollowed-out communities.

Simply put, we are asking how has the American Dream been broken and how can it be restored?

WHAT WE KNOW AND WHAT IS MISSING

In general, indicators such as economic growth and unemployment rates continue to improve in the U.S., as do some markers of well-being, such as longevity. Yet the aggregate indicators mask inequality of access and outcomes. Such indicators do not account, for example, for the decline in prime age male labor force participation, nor do they reflect the rising numbers of “deaths of despair” due to opioid or other drug overdoses, suicide, and other preventable causes. Such deaths are concentrated among less than college educated, middle-aged whites.

The past few decades have also seen a dramatic increase in the disability rate (the number of disabled Social Security beneficiaries), greater income inequality, and stagnating mobility rates. Different regions have had divergent fortunes, meanwhile, and many, particularly in the heartland where manufacturing has declined, are characterized by “left-behind” populations in poor health and with little hope for the future, and a hollowed out middle-class.

As such, the macro numbers simply do not capture the full picture of inequality, public frustration, and socioeconomic distress. Well-being metrics could be part of the solution in understanding trends among and across subpopulations.

Looking back on recent episodes of political upheaval, previous decades produced clear indicators that should have been seen as red flags for the current crisis. If we can better identify these risk factors in advance, then we can provide appropriate policy recommendations to those working in communities most affected, as well as anticipate the challenges of those populations and places at greatest risk.

HOW CAN RESEARCH AND DATA BE USED AT THE LOCAL LEVEL? THE APPLICATION OF SUBJECTIVE MEASURES

As we further explore metrics of well-being, the question will be how to analyze data in a way that is useable and valuable to local leaders. While well-being measures offer interesting insights, they are inherently subjective and focused on mindset rather than quantitative outcomes. Pairing well-being measures with traditional “hard” measures like GDP and employment rates has proven useful in the past.

As shown by research in Peru into the relationship of traditional economic and social measures to perceived well-being, status, identity, and inclusion, hope is a significant factor in determining success. People who are more hopeful tend to have better economic and social outcomes.

Communities should also strive to achieve a balance between hope and realism. Although our research shows that hope is a key determinant of well-being, excessive optimism can easily lead to disappointment.

Personal responsibility for success is also an important factor. To the extent that people blame themselves (or their neighbors) for the current social and economic challenges, pressure for policy responses is lost. Too much blame on individual agency makes a community unwilling to try to make things better through policy. The goal should be to achieve a healthy balance of outlooks, personal responsibility, and realistic understanding of chances for success.

Better indicators of people’s outlooks on life combined with indicators of opportunity and deprivation could help achieve this at the grassroots level. Novel approaches that combine quantitative and qualitative data can inform a range of community efforts. Scholars at Washington University have already taken the lead by using national data from call-in distress services for individuals and families, with the goal of identifying specific geographic information, down to the neighborhood level, on vulnerable areas.

Brookings scholars actively participated with the state of Colorado to implement a comprehensive system for monitoring mobility and opportunity—the Colorado Opportunity project, and in a separate effort, with the city of Santa Monica to design an effort to regularly monitor a range of well-being dimensions.

NEXT STEPS

Now is an opportune moment for local, regional, and state leaders to make positives changes in communities, rather than waiting for action at the federal level. And, given the complex nature of our crisis of divide and desperation, policies must be better targeted to different age, racial, and socioeconomic groups—and their circumstances, something best achieved at the local level.

Even if analyses and practices are adapted for specific geographic regions and demographic groups, local governance challenges will still make implementation difficult to achieve on the ground. Many communities lack local leadership and empowered community organizations. Nongovernmental organizations, state level governments, and even the private sector can help fill the leadership void in communities and support existing local efforts.

The fact is that the issues of despair in America have no one answer, nor does the responsibility fall on a single sector, institution, or group of people. It will take a concerted effort from many stakeholders, focusing on an immense set of challenges that differ from community to community.

Our collaboration between Brookings and Washington University aims to help those taking the lead by providing valuable data, analyses, and policy ideas.

[“Source-brookings”]