On Women’s Day, IIT students launch roll-on that promises to relieve period pain

IIT-Delhi incubated startup Sanfe on Friday launched an offering that promises to make women’s lives easier every month: a roll-on to relieve period pain. Launched on International Women’s Day, the Sanfe Period Pain Roll-on will allieviate menstrual cramps and ease mood swings.

The essential oil-based roll-on is naturally formulated and has been medically tested and FDA approved. Sanfe Period Pain Relief Roll-On, available in 10 ml bottles, costs Rs 10 for a single use.

Sanfe was co-founded by Archit Agarwal and Harry Sehrawat, third year BTech students at IIT-Delhi. The roll-on was developed by them with the help of their professor, Dr Srinivasan Venkataraman.

Sanfe
Archit and Harry at the launch of the Sanfe Period Pain Roll-on on International Women’s Day.


Also read: At just Rs 10, this pee device makes using public toilets safe, stress-free for women


“Women comprise 50 percent of our population and a significant portion of this population experiences pain and cramps during menstrual period. Therefore, this becomes an important problem to solve,” said Srinivasan, a Professor of the Department of Design.

Archit and Harry previously launched Sanfe Stand & Pee on World Toilet Day, last year. The device enables women to stand and urinate, preventing Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) infections from unhygienic public washrooms.

Menstrual cramps often come in the way of women’s daily routine and companies have been developing feminine products to fight this. Brands, including Peesafe and Sensur, have also launched roll-ons to ease menstrual cramps.

Archit and Harry’s eureka moment was when one of their friends complained of not performing well in the semester exam, due to period pain.

“We realised that period pain forces over 40 percent of women to miss their daily routine. Motivated by this, we started working on a solution to relieve women from menstrual cramps,” the duo said.

They spent seven months on Research & Development. “We don’t want women to suffer because of a natural body function. We figured this problem and designed the roll-on,” said Archit, a BTech Textile Technology student.

[“source=yourstory”]

IIT Kharagpur: Number of Phd degree pursuers to go up

Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur

In a bid to enhance its innovative research, the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur will ensure that there are higher number of PhDs.

IITKGP Director, Prof Partha Pratim Chakrabarti said, “We are aware that there must be more PhDs from top institutions like IIT. PhD students should be capable of innovative research to take the country forward.”  He was replying to a question about Padma Vibhushan recipient and eminent scientist Prof Man Mohan Sharma’s observation at yesterday’s 63rd convocation of IITKGP that output of PhDs in IITKGP should be higher.

“There should be 650 PhDs in a year by 2022 from IITKGP. No other IIT in the country has such a broad spectrum of courses like the IITKGP,” Sharma said in his convocation address as the chief guest.

“Develop contents from all important journals and not solely depend on Google,” Sharma told the graduating students at the convocation.

No involvement of teachers in research

The IITKGP director, who pointed out the need to have innovative aspects in the curriculum, said “as part of that mission we have decided to let undergraduate science honours students work on their own at the laboratory without any involvement of teachers. They will work on their own in the lab, conceive ideas and work on it,” the director, who was accompanied by other faculty members at the press meet, said.

To Sharma’s observation at the convocation that IITKGP should come out with policy paper for water transportation in terms of setting up canals, pipelines and optimal utilisation, Chakrabarti said, “IITKGP is working on projects on how to conserve water in drought situation.”

[ Source : intoday ]

Lights off, coffee: How IIT Kharagpur aims to tackle student depression

IIT

 

Every now and then, one of India’s most prestigious engineering colleges cuts off power to its hostels for an hour in the evening.

The practice, at IIT Kharagpur, is not to save electricity or cut costs. It is instead part of efforts to get students to mingle — contact that officials hope will help cut stress after three of its students killed themselves between January and April this year.

IIT Kharagpur is part of the country’s marquee Indian Institutes of Technology colleges that lakhs vie for each year. Only a few thousands make it, entering a college of intense competition with some of the best minds to vie for top jobs at the end of their four-year course.

“Students are meeting increasingly less. This naturally creates a lot of problems as they end up being alone. This small step will help them connect when they take a 10-minute coffee or tea break,” said Manish Bhattacharya, dean of students affairs of IIT Kharagpur, while explaining another effort to draw students out by installing vending machines for free tea and coffee.

The machines, for which a Japanese company has been roped in, will be in place from the academic year beginning this summer.

The blackout hours are helping, students say. “It was like an outreach programme where the administration wanted to speak to us… tell us what had happened and how it was important to be connected with fellow students. Many came out of compulsion but realised that it helped. Students interacted with each other, even discussing the suicides that had been troubling for many of us,” said Anisha Sharma, a student.

The latest suicide was on April 8, when a fourth-year student was found hanging in his hostel room.

Other efforts include a programme for parents with psychiatric professionals, courses on happiness mental well-being, and reaching out to alumni who faced depression during their college days.

Depression is seen as among the main reasons and students say the institute lacks adequate number of counsellors.

Mental health professionals on campus reported depression, adjustment disorders and, in some cases, personality disorders as among the cases they often come across.

“The first thing that parents ask us when they come to drop their children to the institute is about placements and package. They need to stop this. It puts unnecessary pressure on the students. This is the reason we have decided to have an orientation programme with the parents too,” said PP Chakrabarti, IIT Kharagpur’s director.

Officials said they will also turn a microcredit elective on “the science of happiness well-being” into a 3-credit course for all students from the next academic year.

“We are evolving more courses so students will be able to go for micro-specialisation in science and happiness. The subjects that they take up include depression, grief, so these projects that they take up to engineer happiness are meaningful,” said Prof P Patnaik, IIT Kharagpur.

The courses are run by the institute’s Rekhi Centre of Excellence for the Science of Happiness.

IIT Kharagpur has also decided to collaborate with an agency to identify the strength of students instead of their weaknesses, as is the case with current evaluation systems.

Officials are in touch with alumni for campaigns that will prod students to open up.

“Some of the alumni have approached us and they will share their experiences by recording it and circulating it on the website and Facebook page of the institute. There is a stigma attached with depression and this will address that,” the spokesperson said.

 

 

[“source-hindustantimes”]

IIT Delhi to soon set up School of Design for creative buds

The proposal has already been approved by the IIT Senate and is likely to be placed before the Board of Governors later this month.
NEW DELHI: The prestigious Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) here, known for its engineering courses, will soon set up a School of Design for the ones high on creative quotient.

The proposal has already been approved by the IIT Senate and is likely to be placed before the Board of Governors later this month.

“Be it machines or gadgets, what is inside is what engineers design. But for instance, a phone, how should the case be, how should it look like, where and how the buttons should be, this is not something a technocrat can work better upon and there is a need for someone who specialises in product design,” IIT Delhi Director V Ramgopal Rao told PTI.

The proposed School of Design will offer Bachelor of Design (BDes), a four-year-long course, and Master of Design (MDes) of two-year duration.

“For the BDes there is a separate entrance test in the country and we will be a part of it. Of course, for creative designs you cannot test one on concepts of Physics, Chemistry and Maths but on the ability of creative thinking which is not an engineer’s domain,” he said.

The institute presently offers Master of Design but only has four faculty members for the course with a limited intake.

“Once we have a full-fledged school of design, we will recruit more faculty for the Masters course and then start offering the Bachelor’s degree,” Rao said.

“For the practical aspects, design students will work with engineers and design products which we will patent and commercialise in the longer run as we do for the technical projects,” he said.

 [Source”timesofindia”]