Kia Seltos launch details revealed, to hit the markets in the 4th quarter of 2019

Kia Seltos

Kia Seltos made its world premiere in India on June 20. Boasting of several impressive features and an exceptional design, the upcoming compact SUV is sure to take the segment by storm. Now that the vehicle has been unveiled, people are curious to know when it will be introduced? While the South Korean automobile major has not revealed the exact launch date, it has said that Seltos will be available in global markets from the fourth quarter of 2019.

The compact SUV is expected to be priced in India between Rs 10 lakh (ex-showroom) and Rs 16 lakh (ex-showroom). While it will be involved in a direct tussle with Hyundai Creta, the challenge will also come from players like Nissan Kicks, Renault Captur, Tata Harrier and MG Hector.

Like the recently launched Hyundai Venue and the upcoming MG Hector, Kia Seltos has connected car technology in the form of UVO. There are 37 smart features related to navigation, vehicle management, remote control, safety and security and convenience.

The new Seltos is being offered with several BSVI (BS6) compliant engines, one of them being a 1.4 Turbo GDI petrol motor and mated to a 7-speed DCT. There are other petrol and diesel mills also, but the exact details are not out yet. However, we do know that the compact SUV will have gearbox options like IVT (Intelligent Continuously Variable Transmission), 6-speed automatic and 6-speed manual.

Talking about the exterior details of Kia Seltos, the compact SUV features a tiger-nose grille upfront with LED headlamps, DRLs and fog lamps. At the rear, there are LED taillights and dual exhaust pipes. One will get features like a 10.25-inch touchscreen audio video navigation system, 8-speaker Bose sound system, multifunction steering wheel, 8-inch heads up display, cruise control and push-button start/stop, among others, inside the spacious cabin of the vehicle.

Safety features include six airbags, ABS with EBD, ESC (Electronic Stability Control), VSM (Vehicle Stability Management), TCS (Traction control system), HAC (Hill-start Assist Control), BAS (Brake-Assist System), 360-degree camera and rear and front parking sensors.

[“source=indiatoday”]

States sharing bank details expose ‘deep pool’ of offshore money, says OECD

Over 90 governments have shared details about 47 million offshore accounts having a combined holding of $5.5 trillion

Governments have uncovered trillions of dollars in offshore funds since they began sharing in bulk bank account details last September, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation said on Friday.

More than 90 governments have shared details about 47 million offshore accounts with other governments since the large-scale exchange of bank details began, the OECD said in a statement.

The information includes balances and transactions on accounts holding a combined 4.9 trillion euros ($5.5 trillion), the Paris-based policy advisory forum said, more than the gross domestic product of Japan.

Also read: A global financial registry to fight tax evasion

Under the OECD’s common standard for reporting account details, participating countries started automatically sharing bank account information in September.

The move was the culmination of a two-decade international clampdown on tax evasion that has all but ended bank secrecy in many financial centres.

“The transparency initiatives we have designed and implemented through the G20 have uncovered a deep pool of offshore funds that can now be effectively taxed by authorities worldwide,” OECD head Angel Gurria said in a statement.

Gurria, who is to present the data to finance ministers of the Group of 20 economic powers at a meeting in Japan this weekend, said tax compliance was already improving.

Tax authorities booked more than $95 billion in extra revenue thanks to voluntary disclosures before automatic information sharing went live in September, the OECD said, raising its estimate by $2 billion from November.

[“source=thehindubusinessline”]

Xiaomi Redmi 7, Redmi 7A and Redmi Y3 tipped to launch in India soon; here’re the details

Xiaomi Redmi 7, Redmi 7A and Redmi Y3 tipped to launch in India soon; here're the details

Xiaomi launched three Redmi phones recently in India — Redmi Note 7, Redmi Note 7 Pro and the Redmi Go. However, the launches aren’t over yet and if leaks are to be believed, Xiaomi may launch three more phones this year in India. As per the tipster Ishan Agarwal, Xiaomi is planning to launch Redmi 7, Redmi 7A and the Redmi Y3 in India soon. According to Ishan, Xiaomi will first launch the Redmi 7 and then Redmi Y3. Not much is known about the launch of Redmi 7A. To recollect, Redmi 7 has already been launched in China.

Talking about the impending launch of Redmi 7A, Redmi 7 and Redmi Y3, Ishan Agarwal tweeted, “As you all would expect, Xiaomi is soon launching the Redmi 7 in India. It will also be launching the Redmi Y3 after that, probably next month or so. And that’s not all, I believe they are preparing another budget smartphone with model code C3F which is probably Redmi 7A.”

Redmi 7 comes with an octa-core Snapdragon 632 SoC paired with up to 4GB of RAM, 4,000mAh battery that cn be charged using a 10W charger. The phone has a 6.26-inch LCD HD+ display with screen resolution of 1520×720 pixels and an aspect ratio of 19:9.

The camera module on the Redmi 7 includes a dual camera setup on the back with a 12-MP sensor and an 8-MP sensor. For selfies, the device has a 8-MP camera and a lot of AI features. The Redmi 7 comes with a gradient finish and waterdrop notch on the front that includes the selfie camera. The bezels on the sides are also slimmer compared to the Redmi 6.

As far as pricing is concerned, Redmi 7 was launched in China for a starting price of 699 yuan which roughly translates to around Rs 7,000.

Meanwhile, the Redmi 7A was spotted on 3C certification site in China in December. Similarly, Redmi Y3 hasn’t launched yet, but was spotted on Wi-Fi Alliance running on Android Pie.

[“source=businesstoday”]

Apple App Store Review Guidelines Updated With Remote Mirroring Changes, Free Trial Details, and More

Apple App Store Review Guidelines Updated With Remote Mirroring Changes, Free Trial Details, and More

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Non-subscription apps developers may offer a free time-based trial period
  • Apple says that apps cannot mine for cryptocurrency
  • Apple also released changes in terms of data security

Apple on Monday quietly posted an update to its App Store Review Guidelines in categories such as safety, performance, business, design, and legal. Alongside the unveiling of iOS 12 that is available to developers for beta testing, Apple has officially introduced the new App Store guidelines that it uses to decide which apps can appear in the store. In the new guidelines, Apple has introduced revisions related to free app trials, cryptocurrency mining, data security, and more.

First up, Apple has detailed updates to safety guidelines, and it includes directions related to objectionable content, user-generated content, kids category, and more. The company has told developers to provide users with an easy way to contact them. In terms of data security, Apple says, “Apps should implement appropriate security measures to ensure proper handling of user information collected pursuant to the Apple Developer Program License Agreement and these Guidelines and prevent its unauthorised use, disclosure, or access by third parties.”

Another notable change appears to be surrounding multi-platform services. It appears to be related to apps like Steam Link, which Apple rejected last month. Later, the company said it was working with Valve to make sure the Steam Link app fit within the company’s guidelines. Now, the company is saying that apps operating across multiple platforms may allow users to access content acquired elsewhere, but that content must also be available via in-app purchases.

“You must not directly or indirectly target iOS users to use a purchasing method other than in-app purchase, and your general communications about other purchasing methods must not discourage use of in-app purchase,” Apple said. For remote mirroring applications like Steam Link, the company also outlined that the host device for such apps must be a personal computer owned by the user, all account creation and management must be initiated from the host device, any software or services appearing in the client are fully rendered on the screen of the host device, and may not use APIs or platform features beyond what is required to stream the Remote Desktop, and more.

The guideline revisions also include new details regarding in-app advertising. According to Apple, ads must be appropriate for the app’s audience and may not target sensitive user data. Apple says, “Ads displayed in an app must be appropriate for the app’s age rating, allow the user to see all information used to target them for that ad (without requiring the user to leave the app), and may not engage in targeted or behavioural advertising based on sensitive user data such as health/medical data (e.g. from the HealthKit APIs), school and classroom data (e.g. from ClassKit), or from kids (e.g. from apps in the Kids Category), etc.”

Also, interstitial ads or ads that interrupt or block the user experience must clearly indicate that they are an ad. They also must not manipulate or trick users into tapping into them, and must provide easily accessible and visible close/ skip buttons large enough for people to easily dismiss the ad, the company says.

Talking about cryptocurrency, Apple has released some new details and specifically said that apps cannot mine cryptocurrency in the background. Also, apps may facilitate virtual currency storage, given that they are offered by developers enrolled as an organisation. For ICOs, Apple said, “Apps facilitating Initial Coin Offerings (“ICOs”), cryptocurrency futures trading, and other crypto-securities or quasi-securities trading must come from established banks, securities firms, futures commission merchants (“FCM”), or other approved financial institutions and must comply with all applicable law.”

Also notable is that Apple has described how developers can offer free trials of their apps. Previously, it allowed free trials of subscription-based apps, but now any app can offer a free trial. Apple says that non-subscription apps may offer a free time-based trial by using a ‘non-consumable’ in-app purchase. It said, “Non-subscription apps may offer a free time-based trial period before presenting a full unlock option by setting up a Non-Consumable IAP item at Price Tier 0 that follows the naming convention: 14-day Trial.” Also, before the start of the trial, apps must clearly identify its duration, the content or services that will no longer be accessible when the trial ends, and any downstream charges the user would need to pay for full functionality.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]