Xiaomi Mi A1 Android 8.0 Oreo Beta Update Needs Testers, Says Company

Xiaomi Mi A1 Android 8.0 Oreo Beta Update Needs Testers, Says Company

HIGHLIGHTS

  • All Mi A1 users are eligible to apply for the program
  • Active users on the MIUI Global Forum will be selected for testing
  • Xiaomi warns that this will not be a stable build

Xiaomi is now inviting applications from beta testers for the Android 8.0 Oreo update that will roll out soon on the Xiaomi Mi A1. The announcement, posted on the official MIUI website, invited beta testers to test out stock Android on the Mi A1. This comes as great news for people who purchased the phone as Xiaomi had promised an Oreo update by the end of the year.

The application states that all Mi A1 users are eligible to apply and only the device’s IMEI number is to be provided for the application. All submitted IMEI numbers will not be revealed publicly. If you use a Mi A1, you can check your IMEI by dialling *#06# on the phone’s dialler.

You also need to have the MIUI Global Forum app installed on the device. On the homepage of the app, select Recruitment. Fill out your information as stated. Click the Submit button. Xiaomi will send selected members a Forum PM for confirmation.

The deadline for the application is 11:59pm CST (9:30pm IST) on December 11, 2017 (Beijing Time) and is valid for all regions but has a mandatory communication language of English. Xiaomi states that the applicant must ideally have an interest to test betas and some knowledge about ROMs. They should also be active on the MIUI Global Forum and willing to discuss with other members in both QQ group and forum. Once selected, the beta testers are required to share bug reports on time. They are also required to discuss and answer queries on the forum.

A standard disclaimer states that this is not a stable ROM, so expect bugs with the ROM and think twice before you apply for it. Also, bugs need time to fix and developers are not expected to rush to resolve issues.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

How Donald Trump filled his company coffers with charity money

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Image: Bobby Bank / Wireimage / Getty Images   

Like autumn leaves, sponsored Cadillacs, Ferraris and Maseratis descend on the Trump National Golf Club in Westchester County, New York, in September 2016 for the Eric Trump Foundation golf invitational. Year after year, the formula is consistent: 18 holes of perfectly trimmed fairways with a dose of Trumpian tackiness, including Hooters waitresses and cigar spreads, followed by a clubhouse dinner, dates encouraged. The crowd leans toward real estate insiders, family friends and C-list celebrities, such as former baseball slugger Darryl Strawberry and reality housewife (and bankruptcy-fraud felon) Teresa Giudice.

The real star of the day is Eric Trump, the US president’s second son and now the co-head of the Trump Organization, who has hosted this event for ten years on behalf of the St Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis. To date, he’s directed more than $11 million there, the vast majority of it via this annual golf event. He has also helped raise another $5 million through events with other organisations.

The best part about all this, according to Eric Trump, is the charity’s efficiency: Because he can get his family’s golf course for free and have most of the other costs donated, virtually all the money contributed will go toward helping kids with cancer. “We get to use our assets 100 percent free of charge,” Trump tells Forbes.

That’s not the case. In reviewing filings from the Eric Trump Foundation and other charities, it’s clear that the course wasn’t free—that the Trump Organization received payments for its use, part of more than $1.2 million that has no documented recipients past the Trump Organization. Golf charity experts say the listed expenses defy any reasonable cost justification for a one-day golf tournament.

Additionally, the Donald J Trump Foundation, which has come under previous scrutiny for self-dealing and advancing the interests of its namesake rather than those of charity, apparently used the Eric Trump Foundation to funnel $100,000 in donations into revenue for the Trump Organization.

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The Eric Trump Foundation golf outing brought in millions for St Jude, billings for the Trump Organization
Image: Gant Lamos IV / Getty Images

And while donors to the Eric Trump Foundation were told their money was going to help sick kids, more than $500,000 was re-donated to other charities, many of which were connected to Trump family members or interests, including at least four groups that subsequently paid to hold golf tournaments at Trump courses.

All of this seems to defy federal tax rules and state laws that ban self-dealing and misleading donors. It also raises larger questions about the Trump family dynamics and whether Eric and his brother, Don Jr, can be truly independent of their father.

Especially since the person who specifically commanded that the for-profit Trump Organization start billing hundreds of thousands of dollars to the non-profit Eric Trump Foundation, according to two people directly involved, was none other than US President Donald Trump.

In order to understand the Eric Trump Foundation, you need to understand the Donald J Trump Foundation. The president was never known for giving his foundation much money, and from 2009 to 2014, he didn’t give it anything at all. Outsiders still donated, though, allowing Trump to dole out their money to a smattering of more than 200 charities as if it were his own, with many of the donations helping his business interests.

Eric Trump set out to do things differently. Coming out of Georgetown, he decided he would try to translate the good fortune he had inherited into support for children’s cancer research. Why this cause, especially for a guy who still doesn’t have kids? “It’s a great question—it’s one that I’ve been asked before—and I’m not really sure,” he says. “I think there is something about that innocence that has always affected me.” After visiting various hospitals, he chose to give to strength, St Jude, the world’s best-known paediatric cancer centre.

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Eric Trump set up his foundation as a public charity, a classification that allows it to raise most of its money from outside donors. In 2007, when he was 23, the first Eric Trump golf tournament took place, raising $220,000. A compelling sales pitch evolved—the free golf course and the donated goods and services assured donors that every penny possible went to charity. The Eric Trump Foundation employed no staff until 2015, and its annual expense ratio averaged 13 percent, about half of what most charities pay in overhead. His original seven-person board was made up of personal friends, an innocuous lot who helped sell tournament tickets, which last year ranged from $3,000 for a single all-day ticket to $100,000 for a pair of VIP ¬foursomes.

For the first four years of the golf tournament, from 2007 to 2010, the total expenses averaged about $50,000, according to the tax filings. Not quite the zero-cost advantage that a donor might expect given who owned the club but at least in line with what other charities pay to host outings at Trump courses, according to a review of ten tax filings for other charitable organisations.

But in 2011, things took a turn. Costs for Eric Trump’s tournament jumped from $46,000 to $142,000, according to the foundation’s IRS filings. Why would the price of the tournament suddenly triple in one year? “In the early years, they weren’t being billed [for the club]—the bills would just disappear,” says Ian Gillule, who served as membership and marketing director at Trump National Westchester during two stints from 2006 to 2015 and witnessed how Donald Trump reacted to the tournament’s economics. “Mr Trump had a cow. He flipped. He was like, ‘We’re donating all of this stuff, and there’s no paper trail? No credit?’ And he went nuts. He said, ‘I don’t care if it’s my son or not—everybody gets billed’.”

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Katrina Kaupp, who served on the board of directors at the Eric Trump Foundation in 2010 and 2011, also remembers Donald Trump insisting the charity start paying its own way, despite Eric’s public claims to the contrary. “We did have to cover the expenses,” she says. “The charity had grown so much that the Trump Organization couldn’t absorb all of those costs anymore.” The Trump Organization declined to answer questions about the payments. But it seems that for the future president, who Forbes estimates is worth $3.5 billion, a freebie to help his son directly fight kids’ cancer took a backseat to -revenue.

“I saw that Eric was getting billed,” Gillule adds. “I would always say, ‘I can’t believe that his dad is billing him for a charitable outing.’ But that’s what they wanted.”

It’s also very consistent. The Donald J Trump Foundation famously acted like an arm of the overall business, using the charity’s money to settle a Trump business lawsuit, make a political donation and even purchase expensive portraits of its namesake. Meanwhile, Trump businesses billed the Trump campaign, fuelled by small outside donors, more than $11 million to use his properties, chefs and private aircraft.

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The Eric Trump Foundation declined to comment on that donation. In effect, though, this manoeuvre would appear to have more in common with a drug cartel’s money-laundering operation than a charity’s best-practices textbook. That $100,000 in outside donations to the Donald J Trump Foundation (remember: Trump himself didn’t give to his own foundation at this time) passed through the Eric Trump Foundation—and wound up in the coffers of Donald Trump’s private businesses.

“His father, Mr Trump, always, until the presidency, had a very, very tight rein on what was going on,” says Gillule, referring to the company’s golf courses. “The buck always stopped with him.”

The costs for Eric’s golf tournament quickly escalated. After returning, in 2012, to a more modest $59,000—while the event brought in a record $2 million—the listed costs exploded to $230,000 in 2013, $242,000 in 2014 and finally $322,000 in 2015 (the most recent on rec¬ord, held just as Trump was ratcheting up his presidential campaign), according to IRS filings. This even though the amount raised at these events, in fact, never reached that 2012 high.

It’s hard to find an explanation for this cost spike. Remember, all those base costs were supposedly free, according to Eric Trump. The golf course? “Always comped,” he says. The merchandise for golfers: “The vast majority of it we got comped.” Drinks: “Things like wine we were normally able to get donated.” And the evening performances from musicians like Dee Snider of Twisted Sister and comedians like Gilbert Gottfried: “They did it for free.” So many sponsors donated, in fact, that the event invitation has carried enough logos to make a Nascar team proud.

Eric Trump maintains that “our ex¬penses on a tournament that made us somewhere in the $2 million range every year was somewhere around 100 grand,” even though his foundation’s tax records show costs soaring to $322,000. When asked for an itemised list of expenses, the Eric Trump Foundation declined to respond.

More than $500,000 was redirected to a variety of other charities, several of which had nothing to do with children’s cancer—but happened to become clients of Trump’s golf courses

Thus it’s hard to figure out what happened to the money. All the listed costs are direct expenses: Items like overhead and salaries appear elsewhere in its IRS filings. Even if the Eric Trump Foundation had to pay the full rate for literally everything, Forbes couldn’t come up with a plausible path to $322,000 given the parameters of the annual event (a golf outing for about 200 and dinner for perhaps 400 more). Neither could golf tournament experts or the former head golf professional at Trump National Westchester. “If you gave me that much money to run a tournament, I couldn’t imagine what we could do,” says Patrick Langan, who worked at the club from 2006 to 2015. “It certainly wasn’t done that way.”

Opaque accounting doesn’t help, as the Eric Trump Foundation began hosting a few other golf events and fundraisers; former board member Kaupp says some were lumped into the cost figures of the Westchester event on the IRS filings. Hundreds of thousands of dollars over this time went directly to the Trump Organization, including one payment of $87,000 to Trump’s golf course in Washington, DC, which hosted a separate event for St Jude.

For his part, Eric Trump offers no indication that the charity is paying for much beyond the day in Westchester. “I’m sure if I hunted, I could find examples of expenses associated with the charity that aren’t due to day-of activities,” he says. “But I would probably have to think pretty long and hard about that.”

It doesn’t seem a coincidence that at the same time the Eric Trump Foundation went from what appeared to be a clean, efficient operation to a seemingly Byzantine one that suddenly found itself saddled with costs, there was a clear shift of control.

I would always say, ‘I can’t believe that his dad is billing him for a charitable outing’. But that’s what they wanted.

In 2010, the year the economics of the tournament suddenly pivoted, four of the seven original board members, who were personal friends of Eric, left. They were replaced by 14 new board members, the majority of whom owed all or much of their livelihoods to the Trump Organization. Six of them were effectively full-time employees, including Trump lawyer Michael Cohen and executive vice president Dan Sca¬vi¬no Jr, who both serve in political roles for President Trump. Another owns a company that billed the Trump campaign $16 million. Add in Eric himself, as well as his wife, Lara, and 9 of the 17 Eric Trump Foundation board members had a vested interest in the moneymaking side of the Trump empire. The foundation had become a de facto subsidiary of the Trump Organization.

“They were wearing two hats,” says Langan, the former director of golf, who says he sat in on meetings where he couldn’t tell where the business ended and the charity began. “You’re dealing with people talking about the event and the charity who also at the same time are thinking about it as a corporation and as a business. It’s a for-profit club. You know, they’re trying to make money.”

Until this board turnover, the Eric Trump Foundation pretty much did what it told its donors it would: Send its money to St Jude. But starting in 2011, more than $500,000 was redirected to a variety of other charities, many of which were personal favourites of Trump family members and several of which had nothing to do with children’s cancer—but happened to become clients of Trump’s golf courses.

In 2012, the Eric Trump Foundation sent $5,000 to a charity called Abilis, which provides services to people with disabilities. That same year, Donald Trump’s nephew Fred Trump, whose son has cerebral palsy, hosted the inaugural Golf for Abilis fundraiser at the Trump National Westchester. Over the next five years, Abilis spent an estimated $240,000 hosting tournaments at the property.

In 2013 and 2014, the Eric Trump Foundation paid $15,000 for tables at a gala for the Little Baby Face Foundation, according to a spokesman for the latter foundation. Over the next three years, Little Baby Face spent an estimated $100,000 to hold golf outings on the Trump course. The foundation denies any direct connection between the two transactions.

Janet McHugh, the founder of a small charity named Julie’s Jungle, was delighted to receive $25,000 from the Donald and Eric Trump foundations in 2013—money she figured came from Eric and Donald Trump personally. Two years later, her charity hosted a golf tournament at Trump National Hudson Valley. McHugh says the decision to hold her tournament there was unrelated to the donation. “They didn’t comp us the golf course,” she says. “We paid.”

Altruism as a business-development strategy isn’t necessarily illegal. But a situation in which outside donor money is redeployed away from the core mission in ways that seem to ultimately benefit the family that pays the majority of the board is—at best—an appearance problem.

Other extra expenditures raise eyebrows. In 2013, Eric Trump used his foundation’s money, rather than his own, to pay $1,600 to the American Society for Enology & Viticulture for a copper wine still and an antique bottle washer at a trade event and fundraiser that he was keynoting. Eric runs the family vineyard in Char¬lottes¬ville, Virginia, about an hour down the road from where the event took place. “I have no idea what that is,” says Eric Trump, referring to the payment.

In 2012, the Eric Trump Foundation wrote a cheque for $25,000 to the George Rodrigue Foundation of the Arts. That same year, George Rodrigue, who had said that his famous “blue dog” paintings sometimes sold for about $25,000, created a portrait of Donald Trump for the auction at Eric’s event. That portrait ended up hanging over the couch in Eric Trump’s house.

What does Eric say about the donation? “Let’s follow up later on,” he replies, when asked about it in a phone call, before getting off the line.

Later the next day, after being told Forbes had several other questions, he sent a paragraphs-long text message, which read in part: “I was reflecting on it last night and have to say I was really disappointed when you said the story would be ‘fair’… It seems like there is a motive against either myself or my family. And if that is the case, I would simply rather disengage.” A spokesperson for the Trump Organization similarly declined to respond further to questions about Eric and Donald Trump.

The ultimate tragedy here is that the Eric Trump Foundation has done so much good. Yes, Eric has indulged in the family trait of vainglory, from Eric Trump bobblehead dolls at the tournament to statements that leave the impression he’s giving the money personally, even though tax records suggest he’s donated six figures total, at most. (Trump wouldn’t tell Forbes how much he’s given to his own foundation. “I think it’s totally irrelevant,” he says, citing the fact that “we never charge” for use of the courses.) But in 2015, a new intensive-care unit at St Jude opened with Eric Trump’s name on it, and the foundation’s money has funded research into a rare form of cancer.

It’s hard to imagine how the early incarnation of the golf tournament—big hauls, understandable costs—would have any problem continuing to spew out millions for years to come. Last year, the Eric Trump Foundation donated $2.9 million, according to St Jude.

But in December, Eric Trump said he would stop fundraising. Running an event with an increasing commingling of business and philanthropy created the kind of conflict-of-interest (not to mention image) concerns that similarly plagued Ivanka Trump’s aborted attempt to auction off a coffee date on behalf of Eric’s foundation.

More recently, the foundation has rebranded itself as Curetivity. A spokeswoman for the organisation said it would continue hosting golf tournaments to raise money for St Jude. A Curetivity event was held this past May outside Washington, D.C., with Eric Trump in attendance, at the Trump National course.

(This story appears in the 04 August, 2017 issue of Forbes India. You can buy our tablet version from Magzter.com. To visit our Archives, click here.)

[“Source-forbesindia”]

SpaceX’s sixth successful launch in 2017 puts Elon Musk’s company on pace to beat its rivals

Falcon 9 Inmarsat Elon Musk SpaceX Launch

 

Flying the biggest satellite that SpaceX has ever launched, weighing in at more than 6 metric tons, proved a routine piece of business for the company’s Falcon 9 rocket yesterday.

The Inmarsat-owned satellite, built by Boeing, was originally scheduled to fly on a larger rocket, the Falcon Heavy, that SpaceX hopes to debut later this year. Flying the big bird on a smaller rocket required some sacrifices on SpaceX’s part—the first stage booster could not be recovered for potential re-use, for example, since much of the fuel necessary would be used in flight. But the success puts the company on a path to finally hit its long-dreamed-of high-speed launch cadence.

SpaceX has been hoping to out-fly its competitors for the last several years, planning on a dozen to even 18 launches in a single calendar year. But in 2015, a mid-flight explosion grounded SpaceX’s rocket for six months, putting a kibosh on those plans, and a 2016 refueling mishap required four months of work to ensure the rocket was ready for flight.

Now, having launched six rockets before the halfway point of 2017, the company looks set to hit its goals and finally fly more rockets than its incumbent competitors, the Boeing-Lockheed Martin joint venture United Launch Alliance, and the European champion Arianespace. That’s striking, given that SpaceX’s first commercial mission was in 2012. (ULA was formed in 2006, and Arianespace in 1980.)

This year, Arianespace has been the victim of circumstance, with its major spaceport becoming a pawn in a political battle between impoverished French Guianans and the mainland French government. The protests have now been resolved, allowing the company to start launching again.

For the rest of this year, SpaceX has plenty to do. It will launch a Bulgarian television satellite, and communications birds for Intelsat, Iridium, SES, and Echostar. It is expected to launch satellites on behalf of Taiwan and South Korea. And the company plans to launch its own demonstration satellite to provide internet access. Perhaps most importantly, it will fly three missions to the International Space Station for NASA, as well as demonstrating an uncrewed flight of its new astronaut-carrying space capsule. Plus, it expects to fly the experimental Falcon Heavy.

That’s a lot of work—at least a dozen more missions—and it will require the company’s engineers and technicians to move fast and carefully, with no major mishaps. The company’s goal has long been a mission cadence of one flight every two weeks, a pace it hit this month and in March but has yet to sustain over time. The tiny signals of progress are there—during yesterday’s launch, the company began loading liquid oxygen into the rocket ten minutes later than usual, part of an effort to compress and shorten the countdown process.

The rewards of frequent launches are clear: Besides establishing the Falcon 9’s reliability, and the constant stream of data used by engineers after every launch to refine the vehicle, each launch represents revenue won by SpaceX.

While the company brushed off financial concerns after its 2016 mishap, with officials noting that it had no debt and $1 billion in cash on its books, replenishing its coffers will give SpaceX greater security and more resources to tackle big projects ahead—including its mooted satellite internet constellation and an inter-planetary transportation system for reaching Mars.

[“Source-qz”]

7 Things to Consider When Starting a Mobile App Company

7 Things to Consider When Starting a Mobile App Company

The rise of online DIY app builders has made it easy for business minded people to enter the mobile market. White label app building platforms give entrepreneurial minded individuals all the tools they need to start their own mobile app company without the need to add expensive developers to the payroll.

White label is by far the simplest way to get involved in the mobile market. DIY app building platforms give you full control of your business. From branding, to pricing, to sales and marketing, you are completely free to implement your own business model. Easy to use drop and drag interfaces make meeting the mobile needs of a variety of different small businesses as simple as point and click.

If you are looking for a low-risk business option, white label app creation is as easy as they come. And, with the rising demand for mobile, now is the time to do so.

Here are seven things that you should think about to help put your white label app venture on a successful path.

Questions to Ask When Starting a Mobile App Company

What Industries Would You Sell To?

The most important thing you need to ask yourself is, “Whom do I want to sell to?” Are you looking to sell strictly to restaurants, or do you think you can corner the education app market?

This question is literally the most important one to ask because you will need to find a white label platform that offers the right components to drop and drag your apps into existence.

In addition, determining what industry or industries you want to sell to will allow you to start to develop your marketing plan. It’s not wise for anyone embarking on any business endeavor to dive in headfirst and hope. A bit of planning and some foresight are the cornerstones of any business venture — especially one that involves such a rapidly growing market like mobile apps. Think, plan, and then start to play.

How Would You Sell to Your Preferred Industry?

The mobile app market is competitive, so you need to be prepared to do your due diligence. It’s more than pointing and clicking an app into reality and then walking away. Like any business, there are sales and marketing involved to keep your business afloat.

So, you need a solid sales plan in place before you start investing in a white label app platform. If you are new to the mobile app business, you should look for a platform that offers training in sales and marketing relative to the app market. Do a bit of training, and spend some time putting together a solid sales and marketing plan.

You need to learn some successful sales and marketing tactics such as:

  • What is the best way to sell to small businesses?
  • How do you best market your mobile app company?
  • Which pieces of functionality really help a business grow?
  • Where will you find leads to sell to?
  • What should your presentations look like?

The list could go on and on. But the bottom line is very simple — learn what you need to learn about how to sell the product you want to make. This too will help set your white label app venture up for success.

How Will You Brand Your Business?

Your brand is how your clients know you, and it’s incredibly important. Developing a brand takes a lot of research, thought, and trial and error. Do not take this step in the process lightly. What makes it so important?

  • Your logo is how your customers will recognize you.
  • Your tagline is what will make your customers remember you.
  • Your vision is what will make your customers believe in your product.
  • Your mission is what will make your customers trust you.

You cannot take any of these things for granted. You need to build trust and loyalty, and a solid brand is the key to doing so. If you do not invest your time and energy in this step, you are making your business vulnerable to your competitors who have.

Your brand is what you represent. You need to believe in what you are doing so your customers will too.

What Features are Most Important to You and Your Customers?

Now with the foundation in place, you can start to look at the type of apps you want to create. The easiest way to do this is to look through the app stores. Ask yourself:

  • What do my competitors’ apps look like?
  • What are the reviews saying they are lacking?
  • How can I do what they are doing even better?

Don’t be afraid to talk to people in the niche market you want to build your app for. Find out what the people who will actually use the app would like to see implemented.

All too often, we go to the heads of companies to pitch ideas. While the owner of a restaurant may have the checkbook, the servers and the people in the trenches are the ones who will be using the app.  See what they need to simplify their jobs. You are bound to get some good feedback and some great ideas.

How Much Support and Training Will You Need?

Remember, you are not just going to build an app, throw it in the app store and hope it’s successful. There is an entire cycle you have to go through to get your app on the device of the users who will benefit from it. So, you need to take a good hard look in the mirror and examine your strengths and weaknesses. Are you good with computers but bad with sales? Are you an excellent sales person who is totally turned off by technology?

Your technology IQ today may be great, but what will it be next week? You need to ask yourself, “How much support and training am I going to need to stay in this business for years to come?” And more importantly, you need to ask yourself, “In what nuance of this business do I need the most training?”

Then, you need to make sure that you find a white label platform that offers training in the areas you will need assistance with. A good hard look in the mirror is difficult for most of us, but when you are considering investing time and money into a business venture, looking at your faults, flaws and weaknesses and developing a plan to strengthen them is a lot cheaper than paying for the mistakes they will create later.

Are You Able to Design Apps Yourself or Will You Need a Graphic Designer?

While looks are not everything, it would be a lie to say that people never judge a book by its cover, right? We are naturally compelled to lean towards things that are more pleasing to the eye — even if it’s not always the smartest decision.

Do you possess the skills to design the graphics that will make your app stand out amongst the competition? While most white label platforms have templates that you can choose from that will compliment your niche, if you can design something that will stand out, you will be putting yourself in a position to have your app chosen over your competition.

You might want to think about partnering with a graphic designer. While looks are not everything, they certainly are a great selling point.

What is Your Goal for Your End Game?

Ultimately, you need to know what your end game is. Do you expect to corner the market on educational apps, or are you just looking to supplement your income and pay off a few bills?

Starting a mobile app company can help grow your income moderately, and if done right, it can replace your full time career. It all boils down to how much time and energy you want to invest in making it a reality. Make sure that is clearly established in your mind when you start to put your company together.

Conclusion

White label goods and services have been around for decades. In every industry you could imagine, businesses create products that are rebranded by their partners to sell as their own.

The technology industry, and the mobile app sector in particular, is no exception. As consumers go mobile by the tens of millions, businesses are rushing to catch up, and cash in.

If you are planning on starting your own mobile app company, you have to make sure you do a lot of planning and ask yourself some really hard questions. A good solid plan, and a good analysis of the industry in which you hope to compete, can go a long way in setting your white label business venture on the path to success.

Smartphone Photo via Shutterstock

[“source-smallbiztrends”]