13 pieces of money advice you can’t afford to ignore

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There’s so much financial advice out there that it’s near impossible to follow all of it.

But missing the most important — and often most basic — words of wisdom could end up costing you big time.

To help out, we combed through our archives to round up the best money advice from financial planners, bestselling authors, and the second-richest man on earth, that will help you save and earn the most money.

Below, check out the 13 pieces of money advice you simply can’t afford to ignore:

1. Pay yourself first

“People still don’t grasp the fact that they need to save a dime out of every dollar,” author and self-made millionaire David Bach told Business Insider in a Facebook Live interview. He said the average American who’s saving money is saving just 15 minutes a day of their income, when they should be saving an hour.

Bach noted troubling research from the Federal Reserve that revealed nearly half of Americans wouldn’t have enough money on hand to cover a $400 emergency. Yet, he continued, millions of those people will buy a coffee at Starbucks today and expect to buy the new $800 iPhone next year. Americans have money, he says, but we aren’t saving it.

So get on the “pay-yourself-first plan,” as Bach calls it, and automatically save an hour a day of your income. “When that money is moved before you can touch it, that’s how real wealth is built,” he said.

Sebastiaan ter Burg/Flickr

2. Beware of lifestyle creep

There’s a lot of pressure in your 20s and 30s to keep up with your friends. Maybe they’re buying a nicer car or a house, but if you’re not in the financial position to keep up, don’t try.

“I always refer to it as ‘lifestyle creep’ because one of the big things that people can do — that’s an advantage to them — is keep their fixed expenses somewhat stable and reasonable for what they make,” Katie Brewer, a Dallas-based certified financial planner who founded Your Richest Life, told Business Insider.

Planning for your recurring costs — like mortgage, rent, a car payment, and insurance — ensures that expenses won’t creep up on you and derail your financial future. Of course, Brewer said, if you’re making good money you should have the freedom to spend it how you wish, as long as your lifestyle doesn’t overtake your income.

In short: Live below your means.

3. Take advantage of an employer-sponsored 401(k)

Putting money into a retirement plan as early as you can, no matter the amount, is a smart and easy way to pay yourself first.

If your company offers a 401(k) plan, take advantage of it. In some cases, employers will offer a contribution match. “That means the company contributes a set amount — say, 50 cents for a dollar — for every dollar you contribute up to a specified percentage of your salary,” Beth Kobliner writes in her book “Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance In Your Twenties and Thirties.”

“That’s free money, equivalent to a 50% or 100% return. There’s nowhere you can beat this!” she writes.

Plus, 401(k)s allow you to contribute your pre-tax money, meaning the more you contribute now, the greater the growth (thanks, compound interest) and the more money you’ll have down the road, though you will be taxed when you withdraw the money for retirement. For 2017, the maximum contribution to a 401(k) is $18,000.

Andy Kiersz/Business Insider

4. Invest in the stock market, just don’t try to time it

“No one can time the market, so know that if there is a decline, it’s going to bounce back. Over time, being in the market pays off more so than staying out of it,” Michael Solari, a certified financial planner with Solari Financial Planning, told Business Insider.

A smart play, according to Solari, is to put your money in a low-cost target date retirement fund.

Sometimes known as “set it and forget it” investments, these diversified funds automatically adjust their asset allocation and risk exposure based on your age and retirement horizon. Early on, when the need for that money is still a couple decades away, the fund will adopt a more growth-focused strategy. As you ripen toward retirement, it dials back the risk.

You may not get the average annual return of 11% in your target date fund — given you’ll be invested in a blend of stocks, bonds, and alternative assets — but if you get even 6% per year, an original $10,000 investment will be worth more than $32,000 in 20 years without you having to do a single thing. Compare that with $12,200 in your high-yield savings account or $10,020.20 in your traditional savings account.

5. Build an emergency fund

Let’s face it: It’s really not a matter of if you’ll need to fork over cash for a car or home repair, child expense, or medical emergency, but a matter of when.

“No matter how well you plan or how positively you think, there are always things out of your control that can go wrong,” Bach writes in his bestseller “The Automatic Millionaire.”

“People lose their jobs, their health, their spouses. The economy can go sour, the stock market can drop, businesses can go bankrupt. Circumstances change. If there’s anything you can count on, it’s that life is filled with unexpected changes,” he wrote.

Most financial planners suggest stockpiling anywhere from three to nine months worth of expenses in an emergency fund that you can turn to when in need. If you don’t have savings at the ready, you run the risk of having to rely on family or friends for help, or worse, falling into debt.

Kate Hiscock/Flickr

6. Pay off your credit card balance in full every month

Sometimes a credit card can feel like free money, until you’re slapped with the bill. Even then, most credit cards only require you to pay 1% to 3% of your balance each month, which can be an alluring prospect if your budget is tight. But consistently paying the minimum could cost you a fortune in the long run, damage your credit score, and affect your ability to qualify for a mortgage.

Farnoosh Torabi, a financial expert, author, and host of the “So Money” podcast learned this lesson the hard way.

Not only did she swipe her credit card with no reservations and adopt the bad habit of paying just the minimum amount — Torabi said she once forgot to pay the bill all together.

She remembered incurring a late fee that showed up on her credit report and gave her a true “wake-up call.” The incident happened before she “realized the power of automating” her bills, a practice that can save you money on late fees and relinquish you from remembering due dates and the embarrassment of missing a payment.

7. Don’t sit on too much savings

Saving money is important — and could be easier than it sounds — but if you’re saving too much, you may be keeping yourself from building wealth.

Though you’re “never going to kill your financial future” by accumulating money, Brewer says, “you’re losing out on opportunity costs by having money sitting around … especially if it’s sitting in an account making barely anything in interest.”

If you’re risk-averse, one way to manage savings overflow is to move your money into a high-yield savings account, where you could be earning 1% interest on your money, rather than the 0.01% earned in a traditional savings account. Or, as previously mentioned, stick it in a low-cost target date fund and see your returns balloon over time, with little to no work required.

John Lambert Pearson/Flickr

8. Have more than one credit card

It may seem financially reckless to have a wallet full of credit cards, but it’s actually smart. According to John Ulzheimer, credit expert at CreditSesame.com, having a single credit card can damage your credit score, thanks to something called your credit utilization ratio — that is, how much of your available credit you’re actually using.

“That percentage is very, very influential in your credit score,” explains Ulzheimer. “People say that you’re in good shape if you keep your utilization within 50% of your available credit, or 30%, but really, it should be below 10%.”

Available credit counts all the cards you have: If you have one card with an $8,000 limit and one with a $6,000 limit, your total available credit is $14,000, even if you only spend $1,000 a month. With a single card, you have no unused credit cushioning the impact of your spending. The closer you get to your limit, the harder the hit on your credit score.

9. Pay off high-interest debt first

Sallie Krawcheck, a former Wall Street executive and the founder and CEO of Ellevest, says paying down high-interest debt should always be prioritized, even above building an emergency fund.

She explained the math in an article on Ellevest:

“Say you have $5,000 of credit card debt at an 18% interest rate. Say you happen upon $5,000 of money. If you take some of the advice out there, and split the use of that $5,000 (half to establish an emergency fund, half to pay down credit card debt), you still have $2,500 of credit card debt and $2,500 of money sitting in cash.

“The $2,500 of credit card debt at an 18% interest rate costs you $450 a year. The emergency fund earns almost nothing in interest. So you’re out $450.”

Bottom line: You’ll save more paying off the debt than you’d earn if you invested it, whether in a high-yield savings account or the stock market.

10. Always be insured

Every American citizen is required to have health insurance, or be fined hundreds of dollars by the IRS each year. Kobliner advises signing up for insurance should be “your No. 1 financial priority” because it’ll protect you from unforeseen accidents or illness, and prevent yourself or your family from going bankrupt in the case of an emergency.

If your employer offers health insurance, take it, Kobliner says. It’s almost always cheaper than buying a policy on your own (but keep in mind that you can be covered by your parent’s insurance until age 26). Before signing up, though, make sure you understand the cost and extent of the plan, including your deductible, or how much you’ll be paying out-of-pocket before insurance takes over.

If you do end up needing to purchase a policy on your own, head over to healthcare.gov to compare plans and pricing.

Business Insider

11. Track your spending

Business Insider’s Libby Kane has written, edited, and read hundreds, maybe thousands, of stories about money during her career, and says she’s learned that “the best, most critical first step you can take to improve your finances is to track your spending.”

Keeping tabs on where your money is going, whether fixed expenses like rent or mortgage payments and transportation costs or discretionary spending like dining out and travel, is a crucial part of mastering your money.

Setting up a spreadsheet or using a service like LearnVest or Mint can help you make cuts where necessary and even set you on a path to early retirement, if that’s what you’re after.

12. Pay your taxes — and be smart about it

“Whether you owe money to the tax man at the end of the year or not, it’s always a smart move to file your taxes,” Kobliner advises.

And be aware that you can save money on taxes by taking advantage of deductions, or the specific expenses you’re allowed to take out of your income before calculating your owed taxes. The standard deduction — $6,300 for singles and $12,600 for couples — is a good place to start, Kobliner says.

You can also itemize deductions to maximize your savings by listing specific deductions, including expenses for housing costs like mortgage interest or property taxes, and charitable donations, or making use of tax credits.

And if you don’t file your taxes? You could pay a penalty fee of at least $135, plus interest on the money you owe, and lose ground on your credit report, among a host of other financial consequences.

Chip Somodevilla / Getty

13. Be patient

When bestselling author and motivational speaker Tony Robbins asked billionaire Warren Buffett a few years ago, “What made you the wealthiest man in the world?” Buffett replied, “Three things: Living in America for the great opportunities, having good genes so I lived a long time, and compound interest.”

“The biggest thing about making money is time,” the investor, who’s now worth more than $76 billion, said in a recent HBO documentary about his life. “You don’t have to be particularly smart, you just have to be patient.”

In his latest letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, Buffett announced that he was on his way to winning a $1 million bet he made in 2007 that his investment in an S&P 500 index fund would outperform five hedge funds over a decade.



Policy terms can’t be changed during free look period



What are the important riders that can be bought with a basic term life plan?

—Kunal Gupta

Common riders available with a term life plan include: accidental death, permanent disability, and critical illness. Critical illness rider with a term plan is recommended. This helps avoid a separate pre-issuance medical check-up for a critical illness plan, and the premium is fixed for the term of the policy. The other two benefits—disability and accidental death—are better bought independently, in an individual accident insurance policy. Individual accident insurance policies have several advantages—no pre-issuance medical tests, fixed premium at any age, and lower rates than rider premiums charged by life insurers.

My father had bought a term plan in my name. He passed away last month. How do I make the claim?

—Rupali Beohar

You need to first inform the insurer about your father’s demise. You should mention the date, place and cause of death. Intimation via email is considered valid. Send the following documents to the insurer: filled-up claim form, death certificate, policy document and nominee details. Insurer may ask for more documents based on the stated cause of death. Other documents that are sometimes asked for are: hospital discharge summary, postmortem report, and copy of first information report (FIR), in case of unnatural death.

What is a free-look period? Can I get the terms changed in it?

—Ravi Sinha

The Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority of India (Irdai) allows the policyholder to opt out of a policy after its purchase, within 15 days from the date of receipt of policy document. In this period, the insured can examine the complete policy documents, and if the terms do not meet her expectations she can cancel the policy. The entire premium will be refunded after deducting stamp duty, administrative charges, and mortality charges.

This period does not allow an insured to alter the terms of the policy. Any modifications, if required, would be done with a new contract. Under a free look period, the insured can either accept or cancel the policy.

We are a start-up firm run by 5 co-founders, all in their 40s. We wanted to buy life insurance. Is it better to buy a group or individual cover?

—Sarthak Sharma

There are three advantages of a group policy: it’s cheaper than buying individually; at low sum assured, some of you may get a waiver for pre-issuance medical check-up; and in the future you can expand the group to cover other employees. The disadvantage is that premiums can be revised annually. So, premium may rise in subsequent years. But you are better off opting for a group cover as it’s usually cheaper than individual covers.


Why You Should Care About Four Apps From Apple That You (Probably) Can’t Download Yet

Why You Should Care About Four Apps From Apple That You (Probably) Can't Download Yet


  • Apple introduced iOS 10 at WWDC this year
  • iOS 10 includes several new features like stickers
  • Apple has also overhauled its iMessage app

Apple just released four apps that you probably can’t download yet – but are the first signal of a big shift in the company’s core messaging product.

The apps themselves are four sticker packs from Apple for iMessage that feature different smileys, hearts, hands and some throwback Mac iconography that should delight Mac fans, particularly children of the 1990s.

That bomb icon! The sad Mac! That spray can! It’s just like you finished all the keyboarding tutorial assignments you had to do and now you can use the rest of the computer lab time to fool around in KidPix.

The big catch is that while the apps are on the store now, they’re supported only for iOS 10 and higher. And, if you’ve been paying attention, you know that iOS 10 isn’t out yet to anyone except Apple developers. A public beta period is expected this month but hasn’t started yet.

That means, yes, Apple has released four apps that hardly anyone can use. That’s sort of an odd decision, though one might take it as an indication that the public beta is imminent.

And these goofy sticker packs, while admittedly pretty silly, do represent a part of Apple’s greater ambitions for messaging – a part of the tech world that’s getting increasingly competitive. Because while Apple’s been dinged in the past for not properly jumping on the social-networking bandwagon (Ping ring a bell for anyone?), the wheel has turned to make messaging a major social force. And messaging is something Apple has down pat, in its simplest form.

But Apple seems to want a little more pizazz to compete with other messaging apps, and it’s now willing to open Messages up to other apps and developers to get there. These sticker packs come from Apple but are the first of many add-ons that can be made by any developer.

That change benefits Apple as it looks to keep pace with other innovators in the space such as WeChat. Apple already announced at its June developers conference that it would add a host of features to Messages, including the ability to hand-write notes, to obscure parts of messages and to automatically erase them a la Snapchat. Those in-house features enhance Messages, but the stickers and other apps that tap into iMessage take it from a product to a platform.

© 2016 The Washington Post

Tags: Apple, Apple Messaging, Apps, iMessage, iOS, iOS 10, Snapchat, WeChat

US can’t detect while Cyber-attacks Are beneath way, Survey finds

US Can't Detect When Cyber-Attacks Are Under Way, Survey Finds

A majority of senior federal cyber officers responding to a survey said they don’t think america governmentcan discover cyber-assaults at the same time as they’re under manner.

Cyber-protection officers from the protection branch, intelligence companies and federal civilianorganizations were puzzled within the survey released Thursday by the nonprofit worldwide facts devicesafety Certification Consortium Inc. and KPMG LLP. The corporations said the 54 executives who repliedidentified themselves as “federal senior managers or contractors with cyber-safety duty in government.”

Sixty-5 percent said they disagreed with the idea that the federal government as an entire can stumble oncyber-attacks while they are happening. in addition, 59 percentage stated their “business enterprisestruggles to apprehend how cyber-attackers may want to potentially breach their structures,” in keeping with the file on the survey, which become performed in March. a quarter said their enterprise made nochanges in response to final yr‘s breach at the office of employees control, which compromised facts on 21.five million people and has been traced to hackers in China.

there may be actually situation that the following breach is just waiting to take place,” Tony Hubbard, who heads KPMG’s cyber-safety practice, stated in an interview.

40percent pronounced their corporations don’t know in which their key cyber-assets are positioned.

it really is quite alarming,” said Dan Waddell, who’s North American director of the Clearwater, Florida-based certification consortium and labored on the observe. “They nevertheless do not recognizeprecisely what they have of their inventory” and what gadgets hold important information, he stated.

forty percent of the federal executives stated employees, contractors and system directors as their finestvulnerability with regard to a ability cyber-attack. The document failed to offer a margin of errors for the small survey.

© 2016 Bloomberg L.P.

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Tags: Apps, Cyber attack, Cyber protection, net