The 9 Travel Stores With the Best Gear

The Best Entertainment System Gear

This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter’s independently chosen editorial picks, Wirecutter and Forbes may earn affiliate commissions.

A solid home entertainment system should have essential gear that seamlessly works together and enhances your viewing and listening experience. Here are a few of our favorite recommendations to get you started.

Vizio P-Series F1Rozette Rago

LCD/LED TV: Vizio P-Series F1

The Vizio P-Series F1 is our pick for the best LCD/LED TV, as it offers the best  HDR experience we’ve seen from Vizio. The P-Series F1 has a wide color gamut, full-array local dimming, and movies and shows were shown with high-quality backlighting and brightness during our testing. In comparison to competitor models we tested, it has more HDMI inputs, plus it supports Google Home and Alexa. The P-Series F1 also comes with Chromecast support which allows you to stream content from a phone or tablet. We like that it has a basic, easy-to-use interface and a game mode which lowers input lag.

Shop Now: $800

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TCL 65R617Photo Courtesy of Wirecutter

Budget 4K TV: TCL 65R617

For a great, inexpensive set that has all the features we expect in a modern 4K TV, we recommend the TCL 65R617. It’s equipped with HDR support and better image quality than many pricier competitors. During testing, we found that the 65R617 had far more local dimming zones than similar models in its price range and it offers contrast ratio, resolution, and brightness that make for a superior viewing experience. We like that its Wi-Fi remote has a built-in headphone jack for listening without disturbing others, and love that you don’t need to buy a separate Roku streaming stick. If your space calls for a 4K budget model that’s slightly smaller, we recommend the 55-inch version—the TCL 55R617.

Shop Now: $1,000

Definitive Technology W Studio MicroKyle Fitzgerald

Soundbar: Definitive Technology W Studio Micro

The Definitive Technology W Studio Micro is the perfect soundbar for most TVs because it has a simplistic design, an 8-inch subwoofer that offers impressive sound, and access to streaming services via DTS Play-Fi. During testing, our entire panel chose it as a favorite for listening to music but it also reproduces deep, textured bass which improves movie-watching experiences. It’s a breeze to set up and easy to use on a day-to-day basis, plus it has an array of connection options including two optical digital audio inputs. The W Studio Micro isn’t Bluetooth enabled, but can be controlled over Wi-Fi or with its intuitive IR remote. If you’re looking for a home theater speaker system that’s primarily for watching movies, and one that offers bigger, enveloping sound, we recommend the ELAC Debut 5.1 System.

Shop Now: $900

Photo courtesy of WirecutterSony VPL-HW45ES

1080p Projector: Sony VPL-HW45ES

A good projector can take your home entertainment setup to the next level and the Sony VPL-HW45ES is the best 1080p projector for a dedicated home theater. It’s a great option if you don’t need to stream 4K video and its color accuracy, contrast, and image quality is top-notch. It runs quiet and its lens is flexible which makes it easy to install. Professional calibration isn’t an absolute must as it comes with a built-in image reference preset straight out of the box. Although the VPL-HW45ES lacks an Ethernet port and analog video inputs, its provided features come at a decent price and of all the projectors we tested, it has one of the lowest lag rates.

Photo: Kyle Fitzgerald

Shop Now: $2,000

AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI CableKyle Fitzgerald

HDMI cable: AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI Cable

While an entertainment system is usually jam packed with speakers, a TV, and similar gear, simple additions will come in handy when completing your setup. The AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI Cable is sturdy, reliable, and inexpensive. It’s also compatible with all video sources and any UHD 4K TV. We think that a 3-foot cord is long enough to connect your gear to a soundbar, TV, or receiver, but if you need a longer option, it’s available in lengths of 6, 10, 15 and 25 feet.

Shop Now: $6

These picks may have been updated. Click through to see the current recommendations or availability updates for the best gear for building your home theater, the best 4K TV on a budget, the best soundbar, the best LCD/LED TV,  the best projectors, and great, cheap HDMI cables.

Wirecutter is a list of the best gear and gadgets for people who want to save the time and stress of figuring out what to buy. Our recommendations are made through vigorous reporting, interviewing, and testing by teams of veteran journalists, scientists, and researchers.

[“source=TimeOFIndia”]

The best Apple MacBook laptops for every budget

It’s pretty easy to buy an Apple laptop: You pick one on the Apple website or store that fits your budget, and you buy it.

But if you dig a little deeper into a laptop’s product page, you can find customizable options for certain specs, like the processor, storage space, and RAM. It’s perfect for tweaking a laptop’s specs to better fit your needs and budget.

Apple macbook pro 6Apple

For example, you can tweak the cheapest MacBook Pro with extra performance specs that propose great value against more expensive models. Going into those tweaking details isn’t for everyone, so I’ve done it for you!This guide should help you find which Apple laptop fits within your budget according to what kind of user you are, whether you use lightweight apps, have several open browser tabs and apps, or you’re a power user who needs the top performance. I also propose budget options, as well as “full-fat” models that make less of a compromise on performance and features.

You can even buy certain models from Apple’s Refurbished Mac Store if you want to save some money. Don’t balk at the word “refurbished.” My experience with refurbished Macs from Apple has been fantastic. I saved a bunch of money on my refurbished MacBook Pro , and it came in pristine aesthetic and working condition.

$3,000 – $4,200: For uncompromising performance and little regard to budgeting.

$3,000 - $4,200: For uncompromising performance and little regard to budgeting.

You can max out the processor of the most powerful $2,800 15-inch MacBook Pro with an even more powerful 7th-gen 3.1GHz Core i7 processor for $3,000.

The top, most specced-out MacBook Pro with the aforementioned processor and two terabytes of storage will set you back a whopping $4,200.

$2,300 – $2,800: For power users who don’t mind spending extra for more power.

$2,300 - $2,800: For power users who don't mind spending extra for more power.

Powers users who don’t mind spending to get great performance can opt for:

– 13-inch MacBook Pro (with Touch Bar) with 256GB of storage, 7th-gen 3.5GHz Core i7, and 16GB RAM upgrades: $2,300

– 15-inch MacBook Pro (with Touch Bar) as standard (256GB of storage, 7th-gen 2.8GHz Core i7, 16GB RAM, dedicated graphics card): $2,400

– 15-inch MacBook Pro (with Touch Bar) as standard (512GB of storage, 7th-gen 2.9GHz Core i7, 16GB RAM, dedicated graphics card): $2,800

The 15-inch machines will also suit video editors and Mac gamers, as they come with dedicated graphics cards.

$1,800 – $2,000: For busy users willing to spend a little extra for performance, or power users on a budget.

$1,800 - $2,000: For busy users willing to spend a little extra for performance, or power users on a budget.

For busy users who want a better performance guarantee, or budget power users who use more advanced apps, your best options are:

– 15-inch MacBook Pro (no Touch Bar) as standard (256GB storage, 4th-gen 2.2GHz Core i7, and 16GB RAM): $2,000

– 13-inch MacBook Pro (no Touch Bar) with 128GB to 256GB storage, 7th-gen 2.5GHz Core i7, and 16GB RAM upgrades: $1,800 – $2,000

– 13-inch MacBook (with Touchbar) with 256GB storage, 7th-gen 3.1GHz Core i5 as standard, and 16GB RAM upgrade: $2,000

For more 15-inch models in this budget range, you’d do well to check out Apple’s Refurbished Mac Store for the 2016 15-inch models with 6th-gen 2.6GHz Core i7 processors and Touch Bar, which start at $1,850. The refurbished 2016 models are a better deal considering their newer specs and better pricing than the aforementioned 15-inch MacBook Pro with a 4th-gen processor.

$1,500 – $1,700: The value sweet spot for busy users with lots of open web browser tabs and/or multiple basic apps running at the same time.

$1,500 - $1,700: The value sweet spot for busy users with lots of open web browser tabs and/or multiple basic apps running at the same time.

The base 13-inch MacBook Pro without a Touch Bar comes standard with 8GB of RAM, but you can give it a meaningful performance boost by opting for the 16GB RAM option. You can pick that option on the product pages for 128GB and 256GB storage models. It’ll cost you an extra $200 on top of the laptop’s $1,300 – $1,500 price tag, but it will make a huge difference.

RAM is where your computer stores your open apps and browser tabs so you can quickly switch between them. The more RAM you have, the more apps and browser tabs you can run without your computer slowing down. For busy users who usually have lots of open web browser tabs and apps, I’d generally recommend you consider more RAM before processing power, at least when it comes to basic apps and tasks.

The processor that comes standard with the laptop will handle basic apps just fine, and will even do you proud for lightweight photo editing.

$1,500: For the lightweight user who wants a premium design and the ultimate in portability with little concern about budgeting.

$1,500: For the lightweight user who wants a premium design and the ultimate in portability with little concern about budgeting.

The $1,500 MacBook with a 7th-gen Core i5 comes with more storage as standard than the aforementioned MacBook Air and MacBook Pro. With that said, it offers comparable performance to the MacBook Air for $600 more, at least according to benchmark tests. What you’re paying for here is the MacBook’s extreme portability.

You can find a refurbished model from Apple’s Refurbished Mac Store for a small discount at $1,360.

$1,300 – $1,500: For the lightweight user who wants something more premium.

$1,300 - $1,500: For the lightweight user who wants something more premium.

The base 13-inch MacBook Pro with 128GB of storage ($1,300) or 256GB of storage ($1,500) is for the same kind of person who would buy the MacBook Air but wants a premium design, better features, and more “comfortable” performance for basic and advanced apps.

Spending an extra $300 over the base MacBook Air model will get you a significantly better screen and speakers, as well as better overall performance with the 13-inch MacBook Pro’s 7th-gen 2.3GHz Core i5. You’ll also get a giant trackpad, which makes navigating around macOS and apps easier. It’s also not that much bigger or heavier than the MacBook Air.

It also has better future-proofing potential – where it could last longer before you need to upgrade – than the MacBook Air.

Be aware that the MacBook Pros only come with USB-C ports. That means you’ll need to buy adapters, docks, or docking stations to plug in any legacy peripherals, like standard USB mice and keyboards, or non-USB-C monitors that use HDMI or DVI.

As with the MacBook Air, you can get the 13-inch MacBook Pro for less on Apple’s Refurbished Mac Store.

$1,000: The cheapest option for the lightweight user on a budget.

$1,000: The cheapest option for the lightweight user on a budget.

If you must have an Apple laptop but you don’t need much power and you don’t care so much about fancy displays and features like Apple’s Touch Bar, the base $1,000 13-inch 128GB MacBook Air with a 5th-gen 1.8Ghz Core i5 processor is your best bet – and the cheapest Apple laptop you can buy.

You can also get the model with 256GB of storage for an extra $200.

It’s a remarkably portable laptop that can fit anywhere, whether it be the kitchen counter, your lap on the couch, the home office, or while traveling. It’ll service basic apps and tasks – think lightweight apps like web browsers, note apps, tax apps, messaging apps – admirably. It’ll also run more advanced apps for things like photo editing, but don’t expect lightning quick performance.

Something to note: Apple’s MacBook Airs don’t come with USB-C. Instead, they come with a range of standard ports, including two USB ports, a Thunderbolt 2 port (for hooking up a monitor), and an SD card port (to transfer photos from a camera). There’s no need for adapters here. Those who need a simple, capable laptop for basic tasks aren’t necessarily chasing the latest and greatest technology and standards, like USB-C, and these standard ports are compatible with the majority of accessories, which is a good thing.

You can get this laptop for less if you buy refurbished models from Apple’s Refurbished Mac Store. At the time of writing, there’s a listing for a refurbished 1.8Ghz MacBook Air for $850 – $50 cheaper than brand-new. And if you need more than the included 128GB of storage in the base model, you can get a refurbished model with 256GB for $1,020 – just $20 more than the price of a brand-new base model.

[“Source-businessinsider”]

Best 13-inch laptops in India for December 2017

Thirteen inches. Arguably, it’s the perfect size for a laptop screen. Not too big nor too small, the best 13-inch laptop will sidestep the flimsiness and squint-inducing terror of a smaller notebook, absent the need to intimidate with a gargantuan form factor.

They’re not all Windows laptops either; Apple fans will rejoice at the fact that the MacBook Pro and MacBook Air continue to stun in 13-inch flavors. Whatever the case, you ought to find a notebook that – at the very least – incites interest. Whether it’s a 2-in-1 or a traditional clamshell you’re after, we’ve encapsulated the spice of life in our list of the very best 13-inch laptops.

For a broader view, take a gander at the best laptops in the world today, and if it’s thin and light you’re after, you can also find the best Ultrabook from TechRadar. But, whatever you do, be sure to read on to find our favorite 13-inch picks of the past few months in no particular order.

Best 13-inch laptops:

  1. Dell XPS 13
  2. HP Spectre x360
  3. Acer Aspire S 13
  4. Lenovo Yoga 910
  5. 13-inch MacBook Air
  6. 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display

Best 13 inch laptop

1. Dell XPS 13

If it ain’t broke, make it handsome

CPU: Dual-core Intel Core i3 – Core i7 | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 620 – Intel Iris Plus Graphics 640 | RAM: 4GB – 8GB | Screen: 13.3-inch FHD (1,920 x 1,080) – QHD (3,200 x 1,800) | Storage: 128GB – 256GB SSD

₹114990
Faster than ever
Same long-lasting battery
Still poor webcam position
No Windows Hello

Now graced with 7th-generation Intel Core i processors, Dell has struck (rose) gold with the XPS 13. The lush design, lengthy battery life and even the SD card slot are still intact, only now it’s souped up with improved internal specs and sleeker appearances reminiscent of the MacBook and HP Spectre lineups. What’s more, the full-size processor and 13.3-inch display are crammed into an 11-inch frame made possible by Dell’s own nearly bezel-less InfinityEdge display technology.

Read the full review: Dell XPS 13

2. HP Spectre x360

HP’s flagship 2-in-1 goes ultra-thin with style

CPU: Dual-core Intel Core i3 – Core i7 | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 620 – Nvidia GeForce 940MX 2GB | RAM: 8GB – 16GB | Screen: 13.3-inch, FHD (1,920 x 1,080) – UHD (3,840 x 2,160) IPS UWVA LED-backlit multi-touch display | Storage: 256GB – 1TB SSD

₹122138
Ultra-thin and light styling
Long-lasting and quick-charging battery
Lacks SD card reader
Especially thick bottom bezel

The HP Spectre x360 is the one you introduce to your parents. It’s strikingly well-crafted, boasting a silvery design that makes it every bit as cutting-edge on the outside as it is within. Given the choice between a 7th-generation i5 or i7 Ultrabook-class processor and a 1080p or 4K screen, HP has gives plenty of room for customization. It’s not underpowered, nor does its battery life suffer from overcompensation. In fact, in our own movie test, the HP Spectre x360 lasted a whole 8 hours and 45 minutes. The only real catch is that, like a lot of its competitors, the Spectre x360 also lacks an SD card slot, opting instead for a pair of USB Type-C ports.

Read the full review: HP Spectre x360

3. Acer Aspire S 13

A budget-friendly, thin-and-light powerhouse

CPU: Dual-core Intel Core i5 – Core i7 | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 520 | RAM: 4GB – 8GB | Screen: 13.3-inch FHD (1,920 x 1,080) | Storage: 128GB – 512GB SSD

High performance
Low price
Exterior feels a little cheap
Disappointing battery life

That’s not a typo you just read on the specs sheet – the Acer Aspire S 13 truly is a beast. Replete with a Skylake Core series processors shoved inside a tiny, 13.3-inch body, the Aspire S 13 can handle practically anything you throw at it productivity-wise. Unfortunately, the catch is that with all this power comes a distinct shortage on battery life. It may be an Ultrabook, but the Aspire S 13 only managed 3 hours and 12 minutes in our PCMark 8 battery test. Luckily, the Acer Aspire S 13 also comes with the benefit of USB 3.1, all but a boon in this awkward early age of USB-C.

Read the full review: Acer Aspire S 13

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4. Lenovo Yoga 910

Versatile with a generous helping of elegance

CPU: Dual-core Intel Core i7 | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 620 | RAM: 8GB – 16GB | Screen: 13.9-inch FHD (1,920 x 1,080) – UHD (3,840 x 2,160) IPS multi-touch | Storage: 256GB – 1TB SSD

₹54207
Substantially larger screen
Rocking speakers
Heats up (and gets loud) fast
Disappointing battery life

The Lenovo Yoga 910 is all about second chances. It throws away many of the signature design traits of the previous model, the Yoga 900, in favor of a more pristine outward appearance and a heavy duty Intel Core i7 processor as well as the option of a 4K display. Lenovo also managed to squeeze a larger, nearly 14-inch screen into the same 13-inch chassis of the Yoga 900 without compromise. Not to mention, even with the implementation of USB-C ports, the Lenovo Yoga 910 doesn’t completely neglect USB Type-A, dragging the precious connection standard of the past along with it.

Read the full review: Lenovo Yoga 910

Best 13 inch laptop

5. 13-inch MacBook Air

The best battery life in a 13-inch laptop

CPU: Dual-core Intel Core i5 – Core i7 | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 6000 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 13.3-inch, LED HD (1,440 x 900) | Storage: 128GB – 512GB SSD

₹56789
Fantastic battery life
802.11ac Wi-Fi
No Retina screen
Not easily upgradeable

In a market densely populated with slim-line laptops from a massive range of manufacturers, Apple’s MacBook Air fights on admirably – though it started showing its age on the outside a long time ago. It has Intel’s fifth-generation Core-series processors rather than the newest Skylake variants, but it’s still a capable machine; even more so since Apple made 8GB of RAM standard across the line. If you don’t like the look of its lowly 1,440 x 900 pixel-resolution display, there’s always the 12-inch MacBook – and new MacBook Air models are expected to launch this summer.

Read the full review: 13-inch MacBook Air

best 13 inch laptop

6. 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display

The smallest MacBook Pro is a force of nature

CPU: Dual-core Intel Core i5 – Core i7 | Graphics: Intel Iris Plus Graphics 640 – 650 | RAM: 8GB – 16GB | Screen: 13.3-inch IPS, 2,560 x 1,600 pixels | Storage: 256GB – 1TB SSD

Faster processor
Superb battery life
Force Touch underdeveloped
Unchanged design

Though it may not have the 12-inch MacBook’s slick design, the 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina features Apple’s Force Touch track pad that uses different levels of sensitivity instead of mechanical buttons to make clicks. Even without the fancy Touch Bar, the MacBook Pro exceeds expectations with two Thunderbolt 3 USB-C ports, quieter fans, louder speakers and even a battery life exceeding 7 hours in our anecdotal testing. Despite a controversial keyboard mechanism, the MacBook Pro is thinner, lighter and ready to travel.

Read the full review: Apple MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016)

[“Source-techradar”]