Higher education in India gets a Rs 8,000 crore boost

Government’s estimated schematic budgetary expenditure on health, education and social protection for 2018-19 is Rs 1.38 trillion. Photo: HT

Government’s estimated schematic budgetary expenditure on health, education and social protection for 2018-19 is Rs 1.38 trillion. Photo: HT

New Delhi: To increase investment in higher educational institutions, the Union Cabinet today approved a proposal for expanding the scope of Higher Education Financing Agency (HEFA) by expanding its capital base to Rs 10,000 crore and tasking it to mobilise Rs 1 trillion by 2022.

Briefing reporters after the Cabinet meeting chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Union minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said the government wants to increase investments in higher education, for which an announcement was made in the last budget and HEFA was established.

“At that time its authorised capital was Rs 2,000 crore and now it has been increased to Rs 10,000 crore,” Prasad said, adding that earlier central government universities and other new varsities didn’t get advantage of HEFA but in today’s cabinet meeting, it was decided that they can utilise this fund.

In his Union Budget 2018, the then finance minister Arun Jaitley had announced a new initiative of the government—‘‘Revitalising Infrastructure and Systems in Education (RISE)”—to step up investments in research and related infrastructure in premier educational institutions, including health institutions. HEFA, a joint venture company of Canara Bank and Ministry of Human Resource Development which provides financial assistance for creation of educational infrastructure and R&D in India’s premier higher educational Institutions, was tasked to fund this initiative.

Government’s estimated schematic budgetary expenditure on health, education and social protection for 2018-19 is Rs 1.38 trillion against estimated expenditure of Rs 1.22 trillion in 2017-18.

[“Source-livemint”]

Xiaomi Mi 7 and 8th Anniversary Edition Phone Tipped to Launch in May; May Be Called Mi 8 Instead

Xiaomi Mi 7 and 8th Anniversary Edition Phone Tipped to Launch in May; May Be Called Mi 8 Instead

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Mi 7 and 8th-anniversary edition smartphones expected
  • Xiaomi may unveil Mi 8 to align with its anniversary
  • New smartphone may have 3D facial sensing

Chinese mobile maker Xiaomi is expected to launch the successor to its premium Mi 6 smartphone this year. Xiaomi fans were expecting a Mi 7 handset to be launched at MWC 2018, but that did not happen, and the company went on to unveil the Mi Mix 2S in March. However, the latest leaks suggest that Xiaomi will launch the smartphone later this month. Interestingly, reports also suggest that the company either launch two smartphones this year or will reportedly skip its Mi 7 branding to go for just Mi 8.

As per a MyDrivers report, Xiaomi will launch two handsets in May 2018. While one of them is said to be the Xiaomi Mi 7, the other is said to be the firm’s 8th-anniversary edition. The leak claims that the special edition will be the highlight of the launch event. The new smartphone dubbed as the 8th Anniversary Edition phone is rumoured to be unveiled by the end of this month, and it may come with 3D facial recognition feature like the one present in Apple iPhone X. According to the report, it will be the first Android smarphone to feature 3D facial recognition. Similar to the Mi 7, Xiaomi’s 8th Anniversary Edition phone is said to be powered by the Snapdragon 845 coupled with 8 GB of RAM.

Coming to the nomenclature, Mocha RQ, a blogger in China wrote on microblogging site Weibo that Xiaomi will skip the Mi 7 name in favour of Mi 8. Chinese firms are usually obsessed with numbers. It is reminiscent of the time when another Chinese manufacturer OnePlus had skipped a OnePlus 4 smartphone because the number ‘4’ is considered unlucky in China. The blogger explained that Xiaomi wants the name to align with its 8th anniversary. Also, the blogger added that the handset will be announced in May this year.

To recall, another report in April claimed that Xiaomi may, in fact, be one of the first brands to unveil a handset with 3D facial sensing with the launch of the latest Mi flagship. The report had also claimed that Xiaomi’s plans to launch the smartphone with a Snapdragon 845 SoC in the first quarter this year have been delayed. Instead, the smartphone might see an unveiling after the third quarter.

In terms of specifications, the company CEO has already hinted that the Mi 7 will come with an under-display fingerprint sensor. Additionally, reports have suggested that the phone will come with 6GB RAM and Android 8.0.0 Oreo.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Last night’s insights: Round 8: Thursday

Image result for Last night's insights: Round 8: Thursday

Playing on the road for your second game in 48 hours is never easy, but Maccabi FOX Tel Aviv, Panathinaikos Superfoods Athens and Baskonia Vitoria Gasteiz rose to the challenge to start Round 8 with respective road wins. Then came Real Madrid, which returned home to rebound from a 30-point drubbing to win by 32! The EuroLeague gurus focus on the players, the defense and the shots that tell the story of those Thursday night victories.

All-around display – plus Doncic magic – gets Madrid back on track

There was a moment early in the second quarter of Real Madrid’s 89-57 battering of Unicaja Malaga which neatly summed up the many differences between the two Spanish teams on the night. Patient passes from Luka Doncic, Jaycee Carroll and Felipe Reyes allowed Rudy Fernandez to send up a two-point shot which hit the rim, but Trey Thompkins battled hard to win a strong offensive rebound, recycled the ball and then received a whipped pass from Doncic to sink a three-pointer from the corner. That play had everything good about Madrid’s performance on the night: crisp teamwork to set up the initial shot, hard work from Thompkins to win the rebound, a precise pass from Doncic to create a good look, and a clean three-point strike at the end of a passage of play which had seen every home team player touch the ball.

With its winning blend of collective play, creativity, determined hustle and end product, this was an impressive performance from Coach Pablo Laso’s team. And it was extremely timely, too, coming after a worrying three-game losing streak in the midst of a serious injury crisis which has sidelined three big men and last season’s EuroLeague MVP. The only way to respond in such a situation is as a team, and Madrid certainly did that to play with purpose, tempo and an impressive level of confidence considering its recent problems.

Of course, it helps when you can call upon the services of the hottest young player on the planet, and Doncic again showed there’s nothing he can’t do by producing an outstanding all-around display. With three big men missing, the ability of an 18 year-old to come in and grab 10 rebounds was just what Madrid needed, and he could well have finished with a triple-double if he hadn’t been rested by Laso for the whole of the final quarter. Perhaps most impressively, though, Doncic didn’t try to do too much all by himself, instead making good decisions throughout the game and thereby contributing significantly, but selflessly, to the team ethic which played the biggest role in the emphatic outcome.

Three-pointers explain Baskonia’s turnaround

Both Zalgiris Kaunas and Baskonia arrived to Zalgirio Arena with good momentum. Zalgiris came off a big overtime road win against Unicaja Malaga and Baskonia had handed Real Madrid its worst loss in Turkish Airlines EuroLeague history, 105-75. Baskonia got off to a strong start and led 11-21 late in the first quarter. Zalgiris got within 23-24 early in the second quarter and only then, Baskonia started to hit three-pointers, one after another. Rodrigue Beaubois opened fire with his second and third bomb from downtown, then another one by Jayson Granger started a 1-20 run in which Baskonia would hit 4 more shots from beyond the arc – by Matt Janning, Granger, Toko Shengelia and Janis Timma. All of a sudden, Baskonia led 30-52, and the visitors boosted their margin to 36-62 when Johannes Voigtmann and Rinalds Malmanis also struck from downtown. Baskonia had hit 12-of-17 three-point shots until that moment and 10-of-13 since the start of the second quarter. Always proud and getting great support from its crowd, Zalgiris rallied to get within 64-71 with over eight minutes left. Baskonia went back to its main weapon in this game to seal the outcome: Beaubois hit three more, Janning added another from downtown and Granger buried the visitors’ 17th triple with a minute left. When the dust settled, Baskonia had broken the club record for most three-point shots in a EuroLeague game with 17. It had previously had 16 against Khimki Moscow Region last week and in a road win against Maccabi Electra Tel Aviv back in December 2009. Baskonia also dished 26 assists, which was just 3 away from its club record, and only committed 10 turnovers.

Baskonia has won three of its last four games – and only lost to Khimki by 1 point – since Pedro Martinez became its head coach. Baskonia hit just 23 of 82 three-point shots in its opening four games (28%), but buried 58 of 118 in the next four (49.2%), which explains its great turnaround since Martinez joined the team. “I think we played a good game, with a great three-point percentage. We had some problems in the second half when Zalgiris pressed fullcourt. We lost our rhythm, made some turnovers and left us without confidence for some moments, but in general, I think a good game on offense and defense and for some minutes, we did great on offense,” Martinez said after the game. “I think that if we keep playing like this – like I said, as a team, offensively and defensively, we can beat anybody,” Shengelia added. If they keep making all those threes, that is surely the case.

The incredible Nick Calathes leads Panathinaikos

Nick Calathes had a career-game, coming a rebound shy of a historic triple-double, and Panathinaikos needed every single statistical input of his to snatch an 81-82 road win over Anadolu Efes Istanbul. There have been only two triple-doubles in the EuroLeague this century, both by Maccabi’s Nikola Vujcic, and the last one came in 2006. Calathes scored a career-high 29 points, had 10 assists and 9 rebounds last night. It’s is the second time he was that close to this historic feat, after posting 13 points, 11 rebounds and 9 assists last year in Bamberg. “The triple double does not matter, the win is what it counts,” Calathes said after the game. “Me getting a triple-double or not getting a triple-double, for our team to get a win is a lot more important.”

Calathes was awarded his last rebound in the very last second of the game, when he took control of the game-sealing blocked shot by his teammate James Gist. His potential triple-double looked a lot more likely with 1:30 left in the third quarter, at that time he already had 16 points, 10 assists and 8 rebounds. However, in the final quarter, as Efes went up 69-62, Panathinaikos needed scoring, and Calathes delivered. He scored 13 points in the final 5:06 of the game. With his team down 71-67, he first made a pair of free throws, then had an easy-looking driving layup. His triple from way downtown put Panathinaikos up 73-75. After the hosts regained the lead, Calathes drove through the Efes defense for another layup, before beating the shot-clock with his third three of the night, 79-82. No Efes player managed to contain Calathes, let alone stop him: “Calathes played an incredible game, I feel that he had control of everything, had good mentality on defense and offense,” coach Xavi Pascual praised his point guard who played 36 minutes on the floor. “This is why I kept him a lot of minutes today. And I am very happy for him, because he is an incredible worker. When a guy like him has a night like this, you must be happy for him.”

Maccabi defense comes through at Khimki

If you peruse the box score from Maccabi’s road win at Khimki Moscow Region, the one number that should jump out is 20. That is the number of turnovers the hosts committed – which is tied for the second-most ever by a Khimki squad in a EuroLeague game – and more than a third of them came from Alexey Shved. Khimki’s star guard is second in the league in scoring and bettered his average with 21 points in addition to 4 assists, but his 7 turnovers put a damper on his performance. Maccabi’s also silenced Khimki playmaker Stefan Markovic, who did not score in 19 minutes and tallied 2 assists with 4 turnovers.

After the game, Maccabi let loose on the game plan to work Shved hard. “He is a great scorer. He can score in multiple ways,” Pierre Jackson said. “Our job tonight was just to throw a lot of defenders at him and make him shoot tough shots.” At times, that backfired as veteran forward Sergey Monia took advantage of Maccabi defenders overplaying Shved on the wing. On three different occasions in which Shved had the ball above the elbow, Shved made backdoor cuts and Monia delivered precise passes for layups of dunks. However that proved to be a small price to play as otherwise Maccabi made Shved and Khimki work so hard to get shots that the turnovers piled up.

”We knew before the game everything about Alexey [Shved],” Maccabi head coach Neven Spahija shared after the game. “He is definitely one of the best, probably the best player in Europe. I think we prepared the game well. Also we executed well. You can plan whatever you want, but if the players on the court are not following the instructions, it doesn’t go well like in the previous game.”

And his comment dives right into the second point. Maccabi had the right game plan and worked Shved and Markovic hard to disrupt the Khimki offense. To that end, five perimeter players spent at least 19 minutes on the court and took part in the defensive effort: starters Pierre Jackson, John DiBartolomeo and Michael Roll and off the bench DeAndre Kane and Norris Cole, the latter of whom collected 6 steals. Maccabi had a fairly average game on the offensive end, but team defense was worth a big win on Thursday.

source:-.euroleague

Nokia 8 Review

Nokia 8 Review

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Nokia 8 marks the return of the brand to the big league
  • The big marketing feature is its Dual Sight camera aka ‘bothie’ mode
  • Nokia 8 price in India is Rs. 36,999

HMD Global announced the re-entry of the Nokia brand in the mobile market late last year, and the Nokia 6 became the first phone to be unveiled under the new arrangement. This was followed by the launch of the Nokia 5 and the Nokia 3, with the focus very much on the entry-level segment. That changed in August when the Nokia 8 was unveiled at a special event in London. This device is the realisation of a long-held dream of many enthusiasts – a Nokia-branded Android smartphone with flagship-class specifications.

The Nokia 8 packs the Snapdragon 835 SoC – a chip that nearly all current-generation Android flagships are built around – and comes with near-stock Android. That means there’s little room for differentiation in terms of specifications or software. Instead, like many other OEMs, HMD is pinning its hopes on the camera to act as the big selling proposition for its most expensive smartphone till date.

To that end, HMD has revived Nokia’s iconic partnership with Carl Zeiss AG – the brand that lent its name to many famous Nokia camera phones back in the day – for the front and rear cameras of the Nokia 8. The phone also packs some new tricks like the ability to capture ‘bothies’ and record spatial 360O audio thanks to technology borrowed from Nokia’s Ozo camera. Is that enough to make the Nokia 8 stand out in a crowded market? Let’s find out.

Nokia 8 design and display

At first glance, there’s nothing striking about the Nokia 8, especially from the front. It has a fairly standard design, with the 5.3-inch display dominating most of the front, and thin, yet noticeable borders on the left and right. Below the display is the oval home button with a built-in fingerprint scanner, flanked by the capacitive Back and Recent buttons on either side. There’s an earpiece above the display, with a selfie camera to its left and a Nokia logo at the far right. The bottom edge of the Nokia 8 has the Type-C USB 3.1 Gen. 1 port, a mic, and the mono speaker, while the 3.5mm audio port is on top. The SIM/ microSD tray is on the left, and the volume controls and power/ wake button are on the right.

Flip the phone over and things start to get a bit more interesting. The top third has the dual camera module and dual-LED flash lined up in the centre, with ZEISS branding separating them. All this is housed in a small ‘island’ of glass surrounded by an oval-shaped metallic ring that gives the Nokia 8 a tiny camera bump at the back. Another Nokia logo adorns the centre of the phone’s back, and there’s a fair amount of regulatory text towards the bottom, including the ‘Made in India’ tag on our review unit. The antenna bands at the top and bottom blend in nicely with the rest of the phone.

nokia 8 back Nokia 8 ColoursNokia 8 in Tempered Blue (left) and Steel matte finishes.

The Nokia 8’s body is made from 6000-series aluminium, and it comes in glossy Polished Copper and Blue finishes, as well as matte Tempered Blue and Steel options. We got to try both the matte finishes for extended periods of time for our review and found the overall feel and finish to be a notch above other devices in this price segment. We criticised the OnePlus 5 for its uninspiring design in our review, and now, purely in terms of design, it feels extremely dated in comparison to the Nokia 8.

The Nokia 8 has a 5.3-inch QHD IPS LCD screen with a resolution of 1440×2560 pixels that might lack the appeal of an ‘edge to edge’ display, but holds up against the best in the business where it counts. The screen boasts of accurate colour reproduction and it can get really bright when needed, which means using the phone under direct sunlight wasn’t a problem. HMD Global has also used Gorilla Glass 5 for protection.

In the Nokia 8 retail box, you get a 12.5W charger, a USB Type-A to Type-C cable, 3.5mm earphones, a SIM eject tool, and the user guide.

Nokia 8 performance, software, and battery life

As we mentioned earlier, the Nokia 8 is powered by the Snapdragon 835 SoC, which is now standard fare across most Android flagships of this generation. It is backed by 4GB of RAM, 64GB of storage, and a 3090mAh battery, non-removable, of course. India gets the dual-SIM variant of the Nokia 8, but you will have to choose between a Nano-SIM and a microSD card for the second slot. 4G support with VoLTE is available on both SIMs, but only one can be using 4G at any given time.

nokia 8 display Nokia 8 DisplayNokia 8 has a 5.3-inch QHD IPS LCD with Gorilla Glass 5 for protection.

In our experience, call quality was was excellent and 4G connectivity was good even in areas where other phones usually struggle. The mono speaker can get sufficiently loud for calls and even watching videos, and the sound doesn’t break even at maximum volume. However, the placement at the bottom right means you could easily end up covering it while watching a video or playing a game. The Nokia 8 is IP54-rated, which means it’s not waterproof, though you do get protection from water sprays.

The Nokia 8 ships with near-stock Android, with the most noticeable customisations being to the camera app, which we will get to in detail shortly. The lack of software bloat combined with the beefy hardware meant that day to day performance during our review period was a breeze. Multi-tasking wasn’t a problem either, which just goes to show that you don’t need 6GB or 8GB of RAM to make a decent phone. The phone did not get warm even with extended sessions of Breakneck and Asphalt 8, and both games ran without any noticeable issues. In terms of benchmarks, the Nokia 8 was up there with other Snapdragon 835 powered phones.

As we noted at launch, the Nokia 8 has been engineered with an elaborate heat management solution: a copper pipe runs from the upper right corner of the device to the lower left, and is filled with liquid that evaporates in the middle and condenses when it is carried to the edges, in a continuous cycle that carries heat away from the main components. There’s also a graphite layer that transfers the heat to the aluminium unibody uniformly, using a larger surface area to dissipate it to the air.

The Nokia 8 ships with Android 7.1.1 out of the box, which means you get features like App Shortcuts (the ability to initiate actions in apps by long-pressing their icons) and Jump to Camera, the ability to launch the camera app from anywhere (including the lock screen) by double-tapping the power/ lock button. HMD Global has promised updates to Android Oreo and even to next year’s Android P releasefor the Nokia 8 and other smartphones in its current lineup.

Nokia 8 Software Nokia 8 Android VersionAndroid 7.1.1’s App Shortcuts on the Nokia 8 (left). The phone also comes with some motion-triggered shortcuts.

You also get the Glance screen feature, that we saw on Lumia phones back in the day. Your Nokia 8 can display badges for missed calls and unread emails and messages, as well as alarms and calendar appointments on the lock screen. It’s set to timeout one minute after your phone has been set down, but you can change this value to as much as 20 minutes to mimic an ‘always-on’ display. There are a couple of motion-triggered shortcuts as well, though both options are turned off by default. You can turn over your Nokia 8 to reject a call, or have it muted on pickup, if you choose to do so.

In our HD video battery loop test, the Nokia 8 lasted nearly twelve and a half hours, which is pretty impressive. In terms of real-world performance, we didn’t find ourselves reaching for the charger before the end of the day even when our phone usage was heavier than usual. If your experience varies, the bundled 12.5W charger can take the Nokia 8 from an empty tank to a 45 percent charge in 30 minutes, and we also noted it going from 50 percent to 66 percent in just 15 minutes.

Nokia 8 cameras

The Nokia 8 has a dual rear camera setup: a 13-megapixel colour sensor with optical image stabilisation, and a monochrome sensor of the same resolution. While the use of a wide-angle lens and a telephoto lens to offer optical zoom has been been made popular by the likes of Apple, Samsung, and OnePlus, this arrangement is designed to maximise image quality, and has been seen before as well, especially on Honor phones.

How it works is pretty simple: every time you take a photo, two shots are captured – one by the colour sensor and the other by the monochrome sensor – and combined to give you a resulting colour image. The extra information available from the monochrome sensor helps improve the overall contrast and richness of each frame – at least that’s the idea in theory.

We mentioned earlier that the Nokia 8 runs near-stock Android, and it’s the Camera app that’s largely responsible for that “near” prefix. You’ll see a ton of customisations here, most of them to accommodate the underlying camera hardware. The app is set to capture still photos in the ‘Twin’ mode by default, but you can change that to just ‘Colour’ or ‘Mono’ if you so desire. We recommend leaving it in the default mode, unless you are trying to take black and white shots, of course, in which case go with the latter.

Though the camera is backed by phase detection auto-focus (PDAF) and an IR range finder, in our experience, the Nokia 8 took a bit too long to lock focus, which got annoying really quickly. The resulting pictures, however, were good, with the right objects in focus and a good amount of detail as well as accurate colour reproduction, as long as there was plenty of light around us.

Tap to see full-sized Nokia 8 camera samples

In low light conditions, though, the performance of the Nokia 8 suffered, which wasn’t exactly a surprise given the f/2.0 aperture on both cameras. Pictures we shot didn’t have a lot of noise, but they lacked the details that today’s leading smartphone cameras can capture, though, admittedly, most of them are priced higher than the Nokia 8. The rear flash does a good job of lighting up scenes, though the front-facing display flash can be a bit overpowering.

Speaking of which, the Nokia 8 can record 720p, 1080p, or 4K video using both front and rear cameras, though you are limited to 30 frames per second. The quality of videos is decent, and though the microphones seem to do a great job of picking up sounds, we couldn’t discern the difference, if any, made by the Ozo surround sound. You can also record slow-motion and time-lapse videos.

The app also features Live Bokeh and Panorama modes, and the results of both are pretty good. You also get Beautify mode for both the front and rear cameras, complete with varying intensity levels of this ‘beautification’, which is designed to remove ‘blemishes’ from your face – embracing your natural self is clearly so 2014. Controls to toggle HDR mode, the timer, and the flash are available within the main interface for both front and rear cameras, and you can even dive into a fully manual mode with either.

Nokia 8 Camera App Nokia 8 Camera AppThe camera app on the Nokia 8 has been customised to accomodate the underlying hardware.

The app can be a bit confusing at times – for example, you might wonder “Why am I not seeing the ‘switch cameras’ option right now?” The answer is usually the fact that you are in a mode that doesn’t support the option you’re looking for. Switching from Live Bokeh to regular Photos mode, for example, will fix the issue in that scenario. The icon at the bottom indicating the current mode could have been bigger, or having a carousel showing all available modes at any given time like the iPhone and several other phones would perhaps have made it easier to understand what is currently selected.

That brings us to the Dual Sight camera, or to use the marketing term, ‘bothie’ mode. You can take photos and record video with the Nokia 8 where scenes from both the front and the rear camera will be visible at the same time. The unfortunate marketing name aside, this could be a nice way to, say, record your own reactions when your kid is doing something cute. Resulting images are 16:9, instead of 4:3 when capturing stills using a single camera on the Nokia 8 by default (this can also be changed to 16:9 from Settings within the Camera app, if you want).

We’ve seen third-party apps and other Android phones do this before, but what HMD is really pushing here is the ability to livestream bothie (and indeed ‘regular’) videos to Facebook and YouTube right from within the camera app. The company says it worked closely with Qualcomm to be the first to push this feature out, but you can expect it to be available on other smartphones soon.

We can imagine this feature being useful when you are at, say, a concert, or if you are a reporter covering a live event, when you want to capture both sides of the story. The streaming feature worked as advertised, though we should note that you might need to verify your YouTube account and enable live streaming manually to stream to Google’s platform. Extended bothie streaming sessions can warm up the back of the phone considerably, which is a sign that the heat management solution we described earlier is doing its job.

Tap to see full-sized Nokia 8 bothie sample

Quality of photos and videos taken in bothie mode is decent, but not as good as you can capture when using the individual cameras normally. Note that there is no way to use the bothie mode outside of the stock Camera app at the moment.

Verdict
Nokia made its name selling no-nonsense phones that were built to last, and while the ownership of the mobile brand might have changed hands, the Nokia 8 is a smartphone that would have been a worthy addition to the lineup of the Finnish company even in its heyday. It offers good build quality, a great display, excellent performance with stock Android, the promise of regular updates, first-class battery life, and good cameras with some neat tricks. On the flip-side, some might find the design boring, it isn’t fully waterproof like many competitors are, and the low-light camera performance could’ve been better.

Priced at Rs. 36,999, the Nokia 8 goes up against the likes of the OnePlus 5 (Review), and overall, we found it to be the better of the two, despite the latter sporting better specifications on paper. If you are on a tighter budget, you could also consider the Honor 8 Pro (Review), which has a similar dual-camera setup and is a solid all-round performer as well.

Expectedly, the overall experience with the Nokia 8 isn’t as polished as it is with some of the more expensive Android smartphones such as the HTC U11 (Review) and Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and Note 8flagships, but it’s safe to say that if a smartphone like this had shipped from the Nokia stable a few years ago, the Finnish company might never have had to step back from the mobile business. As for taking on the likes of Samsung and Apple at their own game, there’s the rumoured Nokia 9 to look forward to.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]