InsideTracker integrates DNA insights with GoalGetter

InsideTracker integrates DNA insights with GoalGetter

Personalized nutrition specialist InsideTracker is expanding its analytical offerings with the launch GoalGetter, a DNA-based personalized nutrition and wellness product in the store.

The InsideTracker​ testing and analytics kits service was launched by Cambridge, MA-based Segterra  in 2013. While healthcare professionals use blood tests to assess if you have normal or abnormal values, InsideTracker is interested in optimal levels. The platform’s personalized nutrition support is based on blood tests of 41 select biomarkers.

GoalGetter is InsideTracker’s first product to integrate DNA-powered insights, and is a natural continuation of the company’s science-based blood analytics platform, founder and CSO, Gil Blander, PhD, told NutraIngredients-USA.

By integrating self-reported physiological information about personal behaviors and preferences, GoalGetter is able to provide the best science-based recommendations about nutrition, supplementation and lifestyle, said Dr Blander.

“DNA is an additional input that allows us to be more granular” ​he said. “We feel there is enough evidence to begin to educate consumers on the impact their lifestyle can genuinely have on their health and that DNA data is a valuable component of that story. 

“The mission of InsideTracker is to help people live longer, healthier lives, and the combination of blood, genetic and physiological data that can drive decision making around lifestyle is the right approach. We want to identify and supply consumers with the best actionable recommendations based on the best available science.”

How it works

GoalGetter, which has been almost two years in the making, uses DNA to tell consumers which goal best fits their genes. Helix sequences DNA from a saliva sample, and then InsideTracker analyzes 261 of genetic markers and compares them to a personal Exome+  data generated in the Helix CAP and CLIA-accredited laboratory, in order to determine genetic potential for single genetic traits (like lactose intolerance) as well as broad groups of traits (like athletic power and endurance).

Similar to InsideTracker’s blood-based products, individuals have the ability to set new goals, create reminders, and download recipes and other tips.

The goals

Consumers can set goals, including weight (based on analysis of genes that influence glucose, cholesterol, response to carbohydrates, inflammation, and saturated fat metabolism); performance (based on analysis of genes that influence athletic endurance and strength, injury risk, testosterone, B12, oxygen transport, and red blood cells); sleep (based on analysis of genes that influence caffeine response, bedtime, magnesium, and glucose); and healthy aging (based on analysis of genes that influence vitamin B12, vitamin D, calcium, liver enzymes, inflammation, glucose, blood pressure, and white blood cells).

GoalGetter also provides data on an individual’s genetic potential for food sensitivities, which may influence dietary choices and the personalized recommendations. The platform analyzes caffeine, gluten, and lactose, as well as predisposition to peanut allergy.

The science

Dr Blander spent five years at MIT after 10 years at the Weizmann Institute and has done extensive research into biological markers in the blood. The company’s scientific advisory board​ reads like a who’s who of the best researchers of nutrition and aging in the US, including Prof David Sinclair from Harvard Medical School, Prof Jeff Blumberg from Tufts University, Prof Lenny Guarente from MIT, and Prof Roger Fielding from Tufts University.

Commenting on GoalGetter, Dr. Sinclair, Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, said: “The time has come for DNA to improve the lives of millions of people. We are proud to be a leader in bringing to the customer next-gen advances in personalized nutrition, wellness, and performance.” 

The company stressed that while DNA can’t tell you everything about one’s past, present, and future, it can reveal the potential for certain traits and adds yet another layer of scientific insight to the overall picture of an individual’s body.


Insights from our 2017 holiday retail survey

By most accounts, the holiday shopping season was an e-commerce success, with final tallies beating analyst estimates. Earlier this month, we asked e-commerce teams about their holiday marketing strategies — planning, budgeting and expectations — and what they did differently this year from last year.

Nearly 100 respondents shared their feedback. The majority (57 percent) of respondents worked in-house, while 43 percent were at agencies. The client/company size represented skewed to the smaller end, with 60 percent of respondents working with companies with annual revenues below $25 million. Nearly 13 percent represented companies with annual revenues over $500 million.

There were several interesting findings from the survey. Here are some of the highlights from the final results.

Holiday budgets rose across most platforms

Overall, search and social budgets increased this holiday season over the previous year, with 70 percent of respondents saying they increased budgets on both channels. Display retargeting budgets for more than half of respondents (56 percent) also increased year over year. Sixty-five percent used dynamic retargeting ads this holiday season.

More than three-quarters of respondents said Google budgets rose year over year, with 25 percent saying Google budgets rose by more than 50 percent. Nearly 40 percent increased Bing budgets this holiday season, and 66 percent boosted Facebook ad budgets year over year.

Source: Search Engine Land 2017 Holiday Retail Survey

Pinterest advertising remains hard to scale, and that’s reflected here. Just 8 percent of respondents increased their Pinterest ad budgets over last year’s this season, and half aren’t using the platform at all.

Amazon has been rapidly increasing its ad offerings for sellers on the platform. Among respondents, 36.5 percent are selling on Amazon, and of those, 34 percent increased their ad budgets this holiday season.

Holiday planning is primarily a fall sport, but many plan year-round

When it comes to planning holiday marketing strategies, September was the most popular month to get cracking, with nearly 18 percent of respondents starting then. Just over 12 percent of respondents said they plan year-round. Just as many said they don’t have time to plan (this gives me anxiety) as those who said they start planning in August.

Source: Search Engine Land 2017 Holiday Retail Survey

For 56 percent of respondents, planning started at the same time it did the year before, while 20 percent started planning earlier.

These and many more findings from the survey — challenges, tactical changes and consumer behavior changes, to name a few — were the basis of a lively discussion packed with jewels of insights for retailers in a webinar with Brad Geddes of Adalysis, Elizabeth Marsten of CommerceHub and Aaron Levy of Elite SEM. You can find the webinar, Holiday Retail Search Strategies 2017: What worked, what didn’t, on demand (registration required).

Female Hentai Gamers Doubled In 2017 And More Insights From Nutaku’s Third Birthday

A screenshot from Flower Knight Girl, a pick from Nutaku’s considerable NSFW games catalog.

Nutaku, a portal for playing adult-oriented games with sexy animated characters, also called hentai games, just turned three. To celebrate the milestone, the Canadian company released some insights into its 25 million North American customers.

See also: More Than Just Skin: How Hentai Games Are Seducing New Audiences

Right now, Nutaku (Careful! This link may not be safe for work) is the most trafficked North American portal for 18+ games, and the company has had a lot of data to parse. The full infographic is below, but here are some of the most interesting tidbits:

Female hentai gamers doubled in 2017

Female gamers made up only 15% of Nutaku’s audience in 2017, but that’s up from 8% in 2016. This may have something to do with Nutaku’s expanded offerings that allow gamers both to play as girls and to seduce guys as well as girls. In Sweet Volley High, for example, the player avatar is a girl who chooses to romance different female and male cuties at her school.

A quarter of gamers have played porn games at work

I am not sure how Nutaku figured this one out, but 27% of its audience has apparently logged on at the office. I sure hope they are at least gaming on a discreet phone screen. After all, as another insight shows, Nutaku’s mobile audience now makes up 55% of traffic.

See also: Hentai Game Portal Nutaku Invests Big In Latin America

Almost half of hentai gamers play every day

In my June look into the hentai gaming community, I found out that it’s not just an excuse—a lot of hentai gamers say they are playing partially because they like the gameplay. There are puzzle games similar to Candy Crush, card games, and strategy games to pick from.

Check out all the statistics in the infographic below. And if you’re a Nutaku fan, feel free to take part in their birthday giveaway, too. Maybe your gaming habits will be included in the infographic next year!


An infographic for Nutaku’s third birthday.


I cover fandom and journalism at Otaku Journalist. I tweet @laureninspace. I write books; you can read them here.


Microsoft Word Gets a Resume Assistant, Powered by LinkedIn

Microsoft Word Gets a Resume Assistant, Powered by LinkedIn

With an aim to help its users craft a compelling resume, LinkedIn has launched a useful feature called Resume Assistant to bring the insights of the professional networking site directly into Microsoft Word.

After you select your desired role and industry, Resume Assistant will pull LinkedIn insights from millions of member profiles so you can see diverse examples of how professionals in that role describe their work.

“Within Resume Assistant you’ll also see relevant job listings from LinkedIn’s over 11 million active job openings to jump start your search.”

“Along with job openings, you’ll see details of what the job requires, helping you to tailor your resume to a specific role,” LinkedIn said in a blog post on Wednesday.

Within Resume Assistant, users will also see the option to turn on Open Candidates. This feature on LinkedIn quietly signals to recruiters that you are open to new opportunities, and makes you twice as likely to hear from recruiters.

Resume Assistant will be rolling out to Microsoft Insiders starting this week on Windows and will be generally available to Office 365 subscribers in the coming months, the Microsoft-owned firm said.

“Figuring out how to put your best foot forward can be challenging when you’re looking for a new opportunity. Your LinkedIn profile should be the first place you go to update your career journey and to reflect your professional experience and interests. Your profile not only helps to establish connections, it ensures that recruiters can find you for new opportunities, and your network can provide the connection to the ones you’re interested in. We also know that a resume is an important part of the recruitment process, and we want your skills, your experiences, and everything you bring to a company to be best represented across your profile and resume,” LinkedIn added.