Samsung Galaxy Note 8 Launch Set for August 23 Unpacked Event

Samsung Galaxy Note 8 Launch Set for August 23 Unpacked Event

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Galaxy Note 8 is expected to pack 6GB of RAM
  • Samsung has used tagline “Do bigger things” on invite
  • The smartphone is expected to feature dual cameras at back

Samsung is all set to launch the next smartphone in its Galaxy Note series of phablets, the Galaxy Note 8. The company has started sending invites for Unpacked launch event on August 23. While an earlier report had pointed to the same date for launch, we now have the official confirmation from the South Korean company. While the company doesn’t say much on its launch teaser, it has used the tagline “Do bigger things” to indicate a larger display and more features over current flagships.

In the invite image, shared by Samsung Mobile through a tweet on Thursday, the company has displayed the outline of a smartphone with an Infinity Display, just like the Samsung Galaxy S8 and the Galaxy S8+. Notably, the signature S Pen can also be seen right alongside the outline in the invite image, all but confirming the launch of the Samsung Galaxy Note 8. Samsung said, “Find out what it means to do bigger things on 08.23.2017,” in its tweet.

As we mentioned, “bigger things” is likely an indication of more features over current flagships as the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 has been tipped to feature only a slightly bigger 6.3-inch display compared with 6.2-inch on Galaxy S8+.

To recall, the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 is expected to be powered by Snapdragon 835 or Exynos 8895 SoC (depending on the market). The smartphone has been tipped to pack 6GB of RAM. The dual camera setup on the Galaxy Note 8 is expected to come with two 12-megapixel sensors and independent OIS (optical image stabilisation) for each lens. The camera setup on the smartphone have been said to be in a horizontal orientation and the sensors are believed to be separated from the fingerprint sensor by the LED flash and heart rate monitor in the middle. Rumours of an in-screen fingerprint sensor also continue to spread – though of course, it depends on if the company is able to successfully implement it in time for the launch.

As per leaks, the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 has been tipped to house a 3300mAh battery. There have been several leaks about the design of the smartphone and some of the recently leaked cases have even shown similarity. As Samsung had heating and explosion issues with Galaxy Note 7, which recently even made a comeback as Galaxy Note Fan edition in Korea, the company would definitely want to revive the series with a bang (no pun intended).

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Samsung Galaxy Note 8

Samsung Galaxy Note 8

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

6.30-inch

Processor

1.6GHz octa-core

RAM

6GB

OS

Android 7.1

Storage

64GB

Rear Camera

12-megapixel

Battery Capacity

3300mAh

Also See
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 3 (Jet Black, 32GB) – OFFER
    Rs. 21,999
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 3 Neo (Black, 16GB)
    Rs. 24,299
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 3 Neo (Black, 16GB) – OFFER
    Rs. 24,999

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

All The Gear You Need For Trail Running

BORED WITH ROAD running? Hit the trails. Nothing reignites a runner’s soul like hopping rocks, dodging trees, and darting down mountainsides in calculated free-fall. Just don’t venture out unprepared. You’ll want tougher, shoes, sure—but you knew that already. Here’s everything else you’ll need to rouse yourself from that pavement-pounding stupor.

When you buy something using the retail links in our buying guides, we may earn a small affiliate commission. Read more about how this works.

Patagonia Houdini Jacket

Weather on the trail can be capricious, so it’s always wise to pack protection. The Houdini Jacket ensures you pack light, as well. Patagonia’s minimalist ripstop shell weighs less than four ounces and stuffs down to the size of a bar of soap, yet deploys in an instant to shed rain and block wind when conditions turn wet and blustery. $99

Credit: PATAGONIA

Black Diamond Sprinter Headlamp

Your backpacking headlamp might be great for night hikes, but it’s probably too front-heavy for trail running, which involves more bobbing than your typical footslog. Black Diamond put the bulk of the Sprinter‘s (already featherweight) 3.75 ounces into its rear-mounted lithium-ion battery pack, which helps keep the front light from bouncing when you’re on the move. It’s also waterproof, rechargeable, and comes equipped with a red taillight strobe that’ll make you easy to spot on your late-night group runs. $75

Credit: AMAZON

Jaybird Freedom Bluetooth Headphones

Corded headphones will inevitably catch on bushes and brush, but even wireless buds aren’t immune from snags; slack in the line connecting your earpieces is basically a magnet for low-hanging branches. The cable management system on Jaybird’s svelte Freedom Wireless earbuds keeps the connecting wire wrapped closely and comfortably around your head’s occipital bone, completely eliminating cord dangle. The buds, too, are pleasantly low-profile (the fiveish-hour battery lives in the in-line remote), so you won’t have to worry about your beanie or jacket hood jostling them loose. $130

Credit: AMAZON

Outdoor Research Ultra Trail Gaiters

Even waterproof footwear takes on rocks, sand, and snow. To keep detritus out, protect your shoes’ ankle openings with a good pair of gaiters. Outdoor Researcher designed its Ultra Trail Gaiters to be lighter than traditional, knee-high varieties, and more breathable, too—but they’ll still keep debris and moisture from collecting in your kicks. $35-$40

Credit: AMAZON

Adventure Medical Ultralight/Watertight .3 First-Aid Kit

Sometimes you eat the trail, and sometimes the trail eats you (or your running buddy). When it does, be prepared to take care of yourself. Adventure Medical’s lightest first aid kit is perfect for single-day excursions, packing painkillers, bandages, antibiotic ointments, and moleskins into a waterproof pouch the size of a sandwich bag. The whole shebang weighs just 2.4 ounces, so there’s no excuse for leaving it at home. $9

Credit: AMAZON

Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z Trekking Poles

Trekking poles provide extra points of contact on steep, uneven terrain (something your back and ankles will thank you for on grueling mountain runs), and the Distance Carbon Zs do it at a best-in-class weight of just 10 ounces per pair. The shafts even separate into thirds with a push of a button, and fold like tent poles for efficient stowage. $160

Credit: BLACK DIAMOND EQUIPMENT

Survive Outdoors Longer Emergency Blanket

Emergency blankets can shield you from chill winds while helping contain your body’s radiated heat, reducing your risk of hypothermia if you find yourself injured, lost, or stranded in the cold. They’re ridiculously light and inexpensive, to boot; a fancy one costs less than your lunch. $4

Credit: AMAZON

Salomon Advanced Skin 12Set Hydration Vest

By now you’ve realized that a safe day on the trails requires some extra kit. So where do you stow it all? In Salomon’s awkwardly named but impeccably designed hydration vest. It’s got room for everything on this list plus three liters of water, delivering the carrying capacity of a daypack in a deceptively low-profile package. Soft, stretchy materials allow the vest and its contents to move with you with minimal bounce, while an array of well-placed pockets grant you easy access to your stuff while you huff and puff up the mountain. $175

Credit: SALOMON

[“Source-wired”]

Amit Shah calls for linking education with India’s ‘cultural ethos’, says distortions will soon be removed

New Delhi: BJP president Amit Shah pitched for linking the country’s education system with its cultural ethos to remove “distortions” as he termed dynasty politics, casteism and minority appeasement as “cankers” affecting the country.

File image of Amit Shah. AFP

File image of Amit Shah. AFP

“All distortions in our education system will be removed and the entire system of learning will further improve if we connect it with our core values, with our cultural ethos,” he said while speaking at the launch of the book on the speeches of the party’s ideologue Syama Prasad Mookerjee.

While elucidating Mookerjee’s initiatives on education, Shah described him as a “visionary leader” who laid emphasis on the education system which is connected with the basic fundamentals of our society and promotes natural talent. “Mookerjee emphasised on these two points specifically so that education can become a mass movement in the early years of independence as the literacy rate was very low then,” the BJP president said.

Mookerjee founded the right wing nationalist party Bharatiya Jana Sangh which later evolved as the BJP.

Shah said the seed sown then by Mookerjee has become a “huge tree” today. “Mookerjee started the party with 10 members which now has a huge base of about 11 crore members,” he said.

He said the BJP is following Mookerjee’s principles to work on the path of nation building unlike other political outfits which have promoted casteism, minority appeasement and dynasty politics in the country. “These three are cankers which are affecting our
country,” he said.

Lauding the BJP ideologue’s role in nation building, Shah rued that “historians have not done justice with him”. Mookerjee saved Bengal by pushing for partition of the united Bengal before Independence, otherwise the entire state would had become east Pakistan and later Bangladesh, he said.

Not only this, in the case of Kashmir, he also led a mass movement to end the permit system for entering the northern state, Shah added.

[“Source-firstpost”]

Innovative financing for health: Insights from the Grand Challenges Award Repository

Kenya’s Ugunja Community Resource Center will empower community health volunteers in Western Kenya with field-tested, mobile phone software to individualize early child development care. Photo by: Grand Challenges Canada

A new database managed by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is providing opportunities to better understand priorities for funders supporting innovative health projects.

Years in the making, the Grand Challenges Award Repository provides information on 2,009 projects that have been through funded seven innovative health initiatives since 2005 — including five grand challenges, Saving Brains and Saving Lives at Birth.

To understand how these initiatives are helping the development community in Going for Goals, Devex has analyzed the data and produced a visualization tool to unlock critical insights.

What are the funding priorities?

The Devex analysis of the dataset reveals infectious diseases tops innovative funding support according to the dataset. Since 2005, this sector of development health has received more than $550 million in funding for 1,057 projects providing new and innovative ideas to tackle, prevent and eliminate infectious diseases in the developing world.

Of the diseases the projects aim to support, HIV projects dominate, accounting for 199 projects and almost $100 million in funding since 2005. The peak for HIV projects was in 2011, where 44 were awarded funding. Malaria and tuberculosis projects are also high priorities for funders, according to the data, each receiving $51 million in funding support.

Funding for maternal and child health follows behind infectious diseases in priority, with $136 million in funding since 2005. And a long way behind that are mental health and WASH, both receiving $22 million in support since 2005.

With 1,300 projects in the database managed through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the focus on infectious diseases is unsurprising — it is a high priority for the organization. So far, they have invested $357 million into this area of innovative research.

The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health has also been an important source of funding for this area, managing $178 million worth of grants for infectious diseases since 2005.

But the dataset also shows that funding in support of innovation is allowing for experimentation and risk. For Grand Challenges Canada, 593 projects were classified as a “proof-of-concept” with 38 classified as “transition-to-scale.” Innovative funding for health is allowing for true innovation and impact of new ideas to be determined.

What is the geographic distribution?

The location of funding recipients shows a large sway toward research from the United States. A total of 771 projects have gone to the U.S., accounting for $393 million in grants. And a massive 86 percent of this goes directly to research and projects for infectious diseases.

The United Kingdom is a long way behind in second, with $93 million in funding followed by Canada with $57 million. Kenyan organizations have secured $34 million in funding and are ranked fourth in recipients, ahead of Germany and Australia.

In looking at the geographic location of projects, India tops the list in both number of projects (98) and funding (almost $20 million) thanks to Grand Challenges India. 2014 was their peak year for funding, with 36 projects accounting for $6 million. Maternal and child health is a focus for India-based projects, accounting for 26 projects and more than $8 million in funding. Close behind are projects responding to infectious disease — 25 projects and more than $4 million in funding.

Kenya and Uganda round out the top three for both number of projects and funding, with projects operating in these countries prioritizing maternal and child health needs within their borders.

Canada is the only western country to make the top 10 — ranked sixth for projects but 15th for funding with Grand Challenges Canada an important source of this.

Additional geographic data is available in the dataset that identifies countries supported by projects, however this is a field that is not predominantly populated within the database and provides only minor insight into impact. It is an area of the dataset that is hoped will be improved over time.

Click here to explore the Grand Challenges Award Repository data through our Tableau data visualization.

The challenge of collecting innovative funding data

Zach Charat, from the global health, discovery and translational sciences with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, spoke to Devex about the purpose, development and future for the data repository — which he describes as been a long and demanding process.

“We wanted to create a data model that was powerful but limited,” he said. “Some of the initial conversations were crazy in terms of the tracking requests we had. But there was no way we could get the community to agree to everything, so we decided to simply focus on what is most useful — a core set of 20 or fewer fields to start with.”

Information within the database is provided by the managing organization of the grants, and the process of tracking funders and getting them to agree to the data fields for inclusion highlighted the issues with data collection on innovative funding.

Where the money goes, where the work is being done and potential beneficiaries are useful pieces of information that are available within the database, but not necessarily populated universally by the data providers.

“Most of the really juicy information is not in there — including outcomes,” Charat said. “But all of the data providers have a relatively clean checkbook, and can at least tell us where the money went.”

And it is still easily the most informative dataset available on innovative health funding, according to Charat. “We’ve got India in there, China in there, Korea in there,” he said. “I need to work on Israel but they only have a dozen. It’s actually quite complete — it is missing a few but if you are working on a dataset for innovative health funding, this is the most complete available.”

And the ease of accessibility to information makes this a valuable dataset for the development sector.

“Now we can answer question on a range of issues related to health funding, including maternal and child health funding,” Charat said. “Previously it would have taken weeks — or you would just have given up.”

What is the next stage for innovating funding data?

Now that the data is available, the priority is to convince the development community it is an important initiative to get behind and add even more value to the data.

“It would be great if each organization could track nuances in their data better, but we are in the early stages of collecting data and are focused on getting them out of the mud to see the value,” Charat said. “If they see value, organizations may look to hire a summer student to do a big clean up and provide more value.”

But there are also a range of options being trialled and tested for dynamic inputs, outputs and analytics.

“Some organizations want a dynamic API to collect their data but others may make a dozen grants per year — their upload process is manual,” Charat explained. “We are working through the development of the API to make it easy for an organization to hook into the dataset.”

Analysis in understanding the next stage of needs is important to progressing the database moving forward. The first generation of users are primarily funders who just want to understand what their colleagues are doing. Charat will be helping to scope the second generation use case of the site to identify and provide future services.

And increased datasets is also a priority in development.

“The next big one we are fishing for is the U.S. Agency for International Development data, particularly Saving Lives at Birth programs that are not currently managed by Gates Foundation or Grand Challenges Canada,” Charat said. “Saving Lives at Birth is a complicated one — even the grantees themselves don’t know who their funder is. It is a split funding disaster. That’s my last frontier in terms of big sets we need.”

For Charat, the possibilities of the stories and successes that can come out of the dataset are endless. “Once you get a good foundation of data, you can go crazy and dream up all sorts of really fun and potential applications,” he said.

[“Source-devex”]