Uber CEO Travis Kalanick’s Letter to Employees Leaks, Contains Rules for Sex With Co-Workers

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick's Letter to Employees Leaks, Contains Rules for Sex With Co-Workers

HIGHLIGHTS
The company had arranged for celebration in Miami in 2013
Uber CEO had reportedly sent out an internal email titled ‘Miami letter’
The email listed conditions for having sex with fellow employees
Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is back under the scanner for inappropriate behaviour in an email written to his employees that has leaked and made its way to the Web. This email was written as a do’s and don’ts list for Uber employees heading to Miami in 2013 to celebrate a big milestone of the company. At that time, Uber had launched its service in the 50th global city and was taking 400 of its employees to Miami to celebrate the feat. The letter is said to have internally been called the ‘Miami letter’ and it contains explicit language including conditions on having sex with co-employees. This letter is now reportedly being scrutinised by two law firms as the company is under investigation for corporate misbehaviour.

The email is written in a rather boisterous manner with profanity used generously and has quotes like, “You better read this or I’ll kick your ass.” The email goes on to warn people to behave in Miami, and not do inappropriate things like drugs, vomit, and more.

There’s also a condition mentioned for having sex with employees, and in Travis’ words, “Do not have sex with another employee UNLESS a) you have asked that person for that privilege and they have responded with an emphatic “YES! I will have sex with you” AND b) the two (or more) of you do not work in the same chain of command. Yes, that means that Travis will be celibate on this trip. #CEOLife #FML.”
This is a classic depiction of the existing startup culture, and the bro language that is usually used in conversations of executives and employees. However, Recode reports that this email has become relevant again after the company is under investigation about corporate misbehaviour at Uber.

The report states that law firms Perkins Coie and Covington & Burling are looking at whether the letter “helped created the party atmosphere that led to the sexism and sexual harassment, as well as general corporate mismanagement.”

You can read the entire ‘Miami letter’ published first by Recode below:

From: Travis Kalanick

Date: Friday, October 25, 2013

Subject: 九 Info: URGENT, URGENT – READ THIS NOW OR ELSE!!!!!

To: Uber Team

Hey guys, I wanted to get some important information out there. I’ve put together a Q&A that we can use when other folks ask what we’re doing here, and have some DOs and DON’Ts for our time here in Miami.

You better read this or I’ll kick your ass.

__________________________________________

Q&A – If I’ve missed anything, or you just have a random question, please reply to all on this thread!

Q: What is Uber doing here?

A: Uber has recently rolled out to its 50th global city. We are celebrating this company milestone and others and have organized a local grassroots movement to help bring Uber to Miami. #MiamiNeedsUber

Q: What does the Chinese symbol 九 stand for?

A: 九 translates to the number 9. It is a symbol that has internal meaning at Uber but is something we do not discuss externally.

Q: Is this an Internet bubble boondoggle?

A: It’s a celebration of a major milestone for the company, as well as a chance for us to hold a company-wide retreat and organize our efforts globally. It’s the one time that everyone in the company can meet in person all the people we work with every day.

_________________

I have gotten a list of concerns from the legal department. I have translated these concerns into a clear set of common sense guidelines. I’ve also added a few items of my own.

DON’Ts:

1) No lives should begin or end at 九

2) We do not have a budget to bail anyone out of jail. Don’t be that guy. #CLM

3) Do not throw large kegs off of tall buildings. Please talk to Ryan McKillen and Amos Barreto for specific insights on this topic.

4) Do not have sex with another employee UNLESS a) you have asked that person for that privilege and they have responded with an emphatic “YES! I will have sex with you” AND b) the two (or more) of you do not work in the same chain of command. Yes, that means that Travis will be celibate on this trip. #CEOLife #FML

5) Drugs and narcotics will not be tolerated unless you have the appropriate medicinal licensing.

6) There will be a $200 puke charge for any public displays on the Shore Club premises. Shore Club will be required to send pictures as proof.

7) DO NOT TALK TO PRESS. Send all press inquiries to Andrew – [email protected] Additionally, stay vigilant about making sure people don’t infiltrate our event. If and when you find yourself talking to a non-Uber (look for the wristband), keep confidential stuff confidential… no rev figures, driver figures, trip figures… don’t talk about internal process, and don’t talk about initiatives that have not already launched.

___________

DO’s:

1) Have a great fucking time. This is a celebration! We’ve all earned it.

2) Share good music. Digital DJs are encouraged to share their beats poolside.

3) Go out of your way to meet as many of your fellow uberettos as you can.

4) If you haven’t figured it out yet, Miami’s transportation sucks ass. #Slang as many Miamians, drivers, influencers as you can as passionately as you can and let them know why Uber will make this great city an even better place. Every slang matters. #MiamiNeedsUber…

5) If someone asks to meet the CEO and Founder of Uber, kindly introduce him to Max Crowley.

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Tags: Uber, Uber CEO, Travis Kalanick, Miami letter, Uber Investigation
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UP Board Result 2017: Could Yogi Adityanath’s ‘education overhaul’ have a bearing on the outcome?

Uttar Pradesh Madhyamik Shiksha Parishad (UPMSP) will announce the results for Class X and Class XII Intermediate Exams on 9 June, 2017, at 12:30 pm. The results will be put up on official website upresults.nic.in.

File image of Uttar Pradesh chief minister Yogi Adityanath. PTI

File image of Uttar Pradesh chief minister Yogi Adityanath. PTI

But the fate of nearly 34.04 lakh students appearing this year for Class 10th exams and 26.24 lakh appearing for the Class 12th board exams could be altered by the various schemes and policies implemented by the Yogi Adityanath government, aimed to ‘overhaul’ education in the state.

The Hindutva-hardliner had envisioned an education system for his state that “promotes nationalism but is modern”, and had introduced a number of reforms to realise his dream, that could arguably influence the results this year.

“I believe that we will see changes in the new academic year. All departments have been given a target of 90 days and present their achievements in front of me after 100 days,” Yogi had said in an interview with Doordarshan, adding, there is a need of “complete overhaul of the education system” in Uttar Pradesh.

Here are a few steps of Yogi’s plan for education reform that could impact this year’s results:

Crackdown on unfair means in exams

According to a report in The Financial Express, Yogi had called for a crackdown on the cheating mafia. As a result, countless FIRs were registered against students, teachers and other ‘anti-social elements’ involved in the business of cheating.

“We have asked the officials to make it a cheating-free education system and make arrangements in this regard,” Yogi had said.

According to a report in Hindustan Times, close to 2.7 lakh students decided to skip the Uttar Pradesh Board exams, possibly because strict vigilance made it impossible to cheat.

Another Hindustan Times report quoted an education expert on the relation between clearing the exams and the varying levels of strictness to combat mass copying

“The number of students clearing the high school or Class 10th and Intermediate or Class 12 board examinations of the Uttar Pradesh Board fluctuated significantly in the past decade due to strict anti-copying measures implemented from time to time,” the expert said.

Re-evaluation of students scoring above 90 percent

In a somewhat strange decision, a ruling was passed that all papers with scores above 90 percent will be re-evaluated. This decision has students worried as they feel that it would encourage evaluators to keep the marks below the 90-percent limit.

Use of coded answer sheets

According to a report in Moneycontrol, coded answer sheets were used this year in 31 identified districts of the state (where the use of unfair means in exams is common) which is likely to reflect in the results this year.

Rewards for girl students passing Class X boards

The Adityanath government announced that Rs 3,000 will be given when a girl student in the state reaches Class VI, Rs 5,000 in Class VIII, Rs 7,000 in Class 10th, Rs 8,000 on her reaching Class 12th and Rs two lakh when she attains the age of 21.

The government also announced a Rs 10,000 reward for every girl who passed Class 10th in Uttar Pradesh, which could help improve the results this year.

With inputs from agencies

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Tech Giants and Diplomatic Crises: This Week’s Top 7 Education Stories

The Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg points and smiles while wearing a cap at gown at Harvard's commencement

If Sullivan High School had a motto, it would be “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” Its immigrant population now numbers close to 300—45 percent of the school’s 641 students—and many are refugees new to this country. This academic year alone, the Rogers Park school has welcomed a staggering 89 refugees—nearly three times as many as last year and far more than at any other high school in the city. The recent surge, fueled in part by an influx of Syrians, has turned the school into a global melting pot, with 38 countries and more than 35 languages represented. … How Sullivan got to this point is a fascinating story of a school that not long ago was struggling for survival.

In the space of just a few years, technology giants have begun remaking the very nature of schooling on a vast scale, using some of the same techniques that have made their companies linchpins of the American economy. Through their philanthropy, they are influencing the subjects that schools teach, the classroom tools that teachers choose, and fundamental approaches to learning.

The involvement by some of the wealthiest and most influential titans of the 21st century amounts to a singular experiment in education, with millions of students serving as de facto beta testers for their ideas. Some tech leaders believe that applying an engineering mind-set can improve just about any system, and that their business acumen qualifies them to rethink American education.

* * *

How Will the Qatari Diplomatic Crisis Affect Higher Education?

John Elmes | Times Higher Education

The ongoing diplomatic crisis in Qatar will cause “irreparable reputational damage” to the Gulf as a location for university branch campuses, according to an expert on the region.

Qatar has transformed itself as a global education hub in recent years, hosting overseas outposts of 12 international universities, but faces mounting uncertainty after four Arab states—Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, and Bahrain—cut diplomatic ties. They have also moved to isolate Qatar by land, sea, and air, accusing it of funding terrorist groups.

* * *

Is This the Turning Point for Detroit’s Schools?

Erin Einhorn | Chalkbeat

Detroit schools have been buzzing these last two weeks with what feels like a fresh start. A new superintendent—Nikolai Vitti—has landed in the city and started his job as the first new leader of what is officially a new district. …

But spend a morning in a Detroit classroom and it quickly becomes clear exactly how much will have to change in this city before it looks anything like the “mecca” that Vitti imagines.

The Educational Crusade For News Literacy

Issie Lapowsky | Wired

Checkology is the latest creation of the News Literacy Project, a non-profit founded by the former Los Angeles Times reporter Alan Miller. Since 2009, the tiny eight-person non-profit has been working one on one with schools to craft a curriculum that teaches students how to be more savvy news consumers. Last year, in an effort to scale its impact, the team bundled those courses into an online portal called Checkology, and almost instantly, demand for the platform spiked.

“Fake news is nothing new, and its impact on the national conversation is nothing new, but public awareness is very high right now,” says Peter Adams, who leads educational initiatives for News Literacy Project. Now, Checkology is being used by some 6,300 public- and private-school teachers serving 947,000 students in all 50 states and 52 countries.

* * *

The International-School Surge

Alan Wechsler | The Atlantic

The origins of today’s international schools can be traced to 1924, but they’ve grown exponentially in the past 20 years. Originally created to ensure that expatriates and diplomats could get a “western” education for their children while working in far-flung countries, international schools have found a new purpose: educating the children of wealthy locals so those kids can compete for spots in western colleges—and, eventually, positions at multinational companies.

This dramatic change means increased opportunities for American teachers abroad—and, potentially, increased competition in the U.S. from a new demographic of English-fluent and cosmopolitan young people from all over the world.

* * *

How Income Inequality Stacks up at Stanford

Claire Wang | The Stanford Daily

As of 2013, more [Stanford] students come from the top 1 percent than the bottom 50 percent of the income scale. This statistic is true for the so-called Ivy-Plus colleges in general, which include the eight Ivy League schools as well as Stanford,  University of Chicago, MIT, and Duke.

Amid a host of efforts to make Stanford more socioeconomically inclusive, why does the University’s student body remain so dramatically skewed toward the rich? Despite the expansion of financial aid in recent years, as well as reports of increases in students represented in the lower income quartiles, the lines tracing change in Stanford’s socioeconomic makeup remain remarkably flat. Ultimately, these trends have major implications for promoting social and economic mobility.

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Election results: What does a hung parliament mean for education?

School books

The shock election result will come as a relief to schools leaders in particular, following months of audible protest and condemnation over Theresa May’s controversial grammar school expansion plans.

The Conservative Party is left in such a weak position that even if they form a government, ministers will in no way be able to push forward with the much contested selective schooling proposals outlaid in the Tory manifesto.

As a source close to Number 10 reportedly put it to the Times Education Supplement early on Friday morning, grammar school plans are “f***ed”.

The result will come as a huge blow to New Schools Network head and free schools advocate, Toby Young, who has championed Theresa May’s plan to build at least 100 new free schools – including selective schools such as grammars – each year.

While most agree that new school places are needed – especially given the forecasted population increase – free schools remains something of a contentious issue, with some arguing they are too costly and unaccountable, receiving huge budgets while local authority schools are neglected.

As director of NSN, Mr Young was tasked with helping to deliver the new free schools, which are autonomous from local authority.

Speaking to The Independent before the snap election was called, however, he suggested that even if the current ban on selective school expansions were to be lifted “no more than five” would realistically have been opened by 2020.

Responding the outcome on Friday morning, Kevin Courtney, General Secretary of the National Union of Teachers, said: “The Conservative party was hugely divided over grammar schools.

“The initiative for them came directly from Theresa May and her advisor Nick Timothy – perhaps only introduced in a misguided attempt to gain voters from Ukip.

“This policy can’t possibly survive this calamitous election. Government education policy now needs to urgently concentrate on and address school funding cuts.”

Schools are already facing very real and immediate consequences as a result of the squeeze on school funding.

We’ve heard and read stories about schools closing half an hour early to save money, parents being sent begging letters asking for donations, and teachers buying art materials and textbooks using money from their own pocket.

 

Speaking on Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour in the run-up to election day, Home Secretary Amber Rudd admitted that a Conservative Government would not increase per pupil funding in England – a disclosure union leaders said confirmed their worst fears.

The future of school funding now hangs in the air: voters have undoubtedly reacted against the Conservative’s real terms cuts of 7 per cent per pupil, as well as the much criticised plans to scrap universal free lunches for infants.

By comparison, Labour pledged to increase school spending per pupil by 6 per cent compared with present levels, and the Liberal Democrat plan would protect spending in real terms at the 2017-18 level.

Responding to the main parties’ manifestos, however, the Education Policy Institute think tank published scathing criticisms that there had been “no clear indication” as to how any party intended to make savings, with “no clear estimate” of how some new policies would cost.

Industry leaders have long called for the school spending budget to be reassessed, and now it might have to be.

“Schools and universities are in comparatively good places,” said Sir Anthony Seldon, Vice Chancellor of the University of Buckingham.

“What they absolutely don’t need is any more initiatives from governments from the left or the right which will only damage the direction in which they are going.

“That said, the cuts to the school programme needs to be urgently eased out, or the quality of education will really suffer.”

The university head suggested a National Headship College needed to be set up – something his own institution Buckingham is proposing to do –  to ensure that the quality of leadership across the country at primary and secondary levels is dramatically improved.

“Finally, teacher recruitment needs to be given a very significant boost, particularly in maths and science, and that will mean more money will have to be found.”

While schools have made headlines for their financial struggles, top UK universities have been slipping down the ranks of recent global league tables – an issue experts have blamed on cuts to funding within higher education.

Despite this, Universities Minister Jo Johnson appears to remain in favour, with vice chancellors including Sir Anthony commending his efforts to pilot new university legislation, including the Teaching Excellence Framework.

“Dropping him would be folly and dangerous,” the Buckingham head warned.

Now, it seems, is the time for industry leaders to place increasing pressure on ministers to protect the rights of overseas students by allowing free movement following Brexit, and by discounting them from UK migration statistics.

“The government needs to start welcoming and celebrating overseas students, not deterring them, and it needs to ensure the softest of soft Brexit’s that will not inflict significant damage on British higher education and science.

“This is the time for strong and stable leadership in education,” Sir Anthony added. “Most governments and most education secretaries only start understanding their subject when it is time for them to pack up and leave.  If they do what is laid out here and nothing else, they will make a success of their job. The rule is – don’t meddle.”

University and College union, which represents higher and further education institutions across the UK, said the next government must prioritise investment in further and higher education and act swiftly to end the uncertainty over the position of EU nationals.

Responding to early indications of high youth turnout, UCU general secretary, Sally Hunt, said: ‘It is encouraging to see that a positive message, particularly after the unpleasant Brexit campaign last year, can still inspire voters.

“Theresa May called this election expecting to secure a mandate for a hard Brexit. She has signally failed to achieve that and the next government must bring some stability in these chaotic times.

“We believe an important first step is to now guarantee the rights of EU citizens currently in the UK, including thousands of university and college staff and students who contribute so much to our economy and society.”

The outgoing President of the National Union of Students, Malia Bouattia, added: “Students want to see progressive and fair policies that will have a very real and positive impact on all our futures.

“We want a government that does everything in its power to welcome international students and keep our universities and colleges diverse and vibrant.

“We have seen the student vote play a key role in marginal seats across the UK. The student vote yesterday was about more than tuition fees… it is unsurprising that they sent a strong message in this election not only to the Lib Dems because of their betrayal, but also to the Tories and their destructive policies of cuts and privatisation. “

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