T20 Mumbai League ropes in Young Creative Services as its creative partner

(Thinkstock Images)

Young Creative Services, a Mumbai based full services agency has been appointed as the official creative partner for the T20 Mumbai League by league manager Probability Sports.

The agency has been mandated as the creative architects for their campaign the ‘League of Cricketkars’ ad campaign and the ‘Aamhi Mumbaikar, Aamhi Cricketkar’ positioning strategy for the T20 Mumbai League.

Anup Kotekar, co-founder and Director, YOUNG Creative Services, said “The campaign has been created very interestingly by integrating the ethos of Mumbai, it’s passion for cricket and Sachin Tendulkar who is the league ambassador. The concept of Mumbaikars being Cricketkars forms the central pillar of the entire campaign. Apart from being a very believable statement given Mumbai’s dominance of the game the unique thought and the campaign will ensure that the T20 Mumbai League is able to differentiate itself and carry forward the positioning through the coming years”

While the T20 Mumbai League is all geared up for its first edition and is being touted as the much-awaited platform for budding cricketers from the city, the advertising blitzkrieg being launched by the league seems to be the perfect platform for homegrown creative talent from the city to showcase its creativity.

Elaborating further on their approach toward the campaign, Wilfred Fernandes, founder and director, YOUNG Creative Services said, “As an ad agency have always tried to create communication that is disruptive but yet connects with the audience at the core level. We do his by focusing our thinking process on the central campaign thought and then weaving creatives once that is cracked. The current campaign for the T20 Mumbai League is an outcome of this approach of ours and we are happy that it has resonated well.”


Is it good that young people are staying on in education?

Pupils writing

On exam results day, education correspondent Jamie McIvor asks a fundamental and unfashionable question: is it a good thing that more youngsters than ever before stay on at school or go to college and university?

Exam passes are high by historic standards, more youngsters are staying on at school and going to college or university.

Is this a good thing in itself? Or is the education system simply having to adapt to the fact that in the modern world there are fewer good jobs for young people, and that unskilled jobs are disappearing?

It is an interesting philosophical question to contemplate – one quite distinct from the question of ensuring all young people can achieve their potential in education, regardless of wealth or family background.

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The suspicion of some has always been that the education system has had to soak up youngsters who might otherwise have been unemployed – either because of economic problems or the gradual disappearance of some unskilled jobs.

In the 1970s the school leaving age was raised from 15 to 16 but it took a further 10 years for a qualifications system which had been designed with the more academically-able in mind to evolve.

For many years, youngsters who were not able to study for a full suite of O grades filled their third and fourth year timetables with “non certificate” courses – seen by some as a waste of effort. The boredom these students experienced was blamed by some teachers for indiscipline.

Standard grades were designed to make sure all youngsters could get a meaningful qualification. This underlying ethos has been carried into the current National qualifications.

But in the 1980s it was still unusual for a youngster who was not studying for Highers to stay on until S5. When someone who was not doing Highers stayed on past their statutory leaving age, again the suspicion of some was that the youngster was only at school to “stay off the dole”.

In Scotland the official school leaving age is still 16, but the majority of pupils, regardless of their academic ability, stay on until S6. It is now unusual to leave at the end of S4 and schools would be genuinely concerned if a youngster wanted to leave early without a good reason for doing so.

Positive outcomes

S4, S5 and S6 are now classed as the “senior phase”. The emphasis is on the qualifications a youngster has at the time they leave – not on what they have achieved by a particular stage.

The number of so-called Neets – youngsters who are not in education, employment or training – is at a very low level by historic standards.

The Scottish government guarantees youngsters who are not in a job a place in education or training. It is often the case that a pupil classed as a Neet has a long back story which helps explains the situation.

If a pupil leaves school before the end of S6 because they have secured an apprenticeship or a place at college or university it would be deemed to be a “positive outcome”; if a youngster simply wanted to leave school for a dead-end job a school might worry this was a failure on their part as the pupil may not have been enjoying their education.

Student celebrating exam successImage copyrightAFP/GETTY

The senior phase is designed to offer a flexible system where any youngster can achieve something of value.

For the most academically-able, the question may be what Highers or Advanced Highers they leave school with. For others, it might be about the number of National 4s and 5s they obtain – even one Higher might represent a big personal achievement.

Colleges have been through a huge shake-up in recent years and now concentrate primarily on full-time courses which lead to a recognised qualification – these are mostly taken by students in their teens or early 20s.

Drop-out rate

Privately, some in the college system warn that colleges are having to accommodate youngsters who might otherwise have been unemployed, as well as those who positively want to be studying a subject. This may be reflected in the drop-out rate for some courses.

So we return to the question: is a school system where it is unusual for a youngster to leave early and a college system which has to find places for those who would otherwise be unemployed achieving something positive in itself?

Or is it merely parking the youth unemployment problem, just like non certificate S4 classes in the 1970s?

Boy doing exam paper

Few in the mainstream would seriously argue that educational opportunities should not be as widely available as possible.

But the issue touches on an intriguing question. Once, it was possible to leave school with O grades and get a job with prospects. Not so long ago, many good jobs were available to youngsters with good Highers.

Today, other than modern apprenticeships, most good jobs for young people require a college or university qualification first.

So is the education system having to deal with the practical effect of economic change?

De-industrialisation and automation mean many of the unskilled, entry level jobs once filled by school-leavers no longer exist.

Or are the changes positively helping to provide the workforce the economy needs?

Skilled workforce

The argument is that Scotland, like every advanced country, needs as skilled a workforce as possible to compete internationally and fulfil its potential.

A skilled workforce does not just mean turning out scientists and surgeons – it means hairdressers and staff for the hospitality industry too.

Once, fewer people in those industries would have received any formal college training and might simply have learned on the job or served a traditional apprenticeship. But the argument is that a proper course and training raises standards and allows the best to shine.

Anecdotally, of course, many of the genuinely unskilled jobs which those with few qualifications may once have done – say stacking shelves in the supermarket – are now done by students or those with college or university qualifications who find themselves “underemployed” .

Indeed, while the number of young people at university is close to a historic high, a significant proportion of graduates do not secure what would be seen as graduate-level jobs even if few would do unskilled work for long.

None of this is to suggest a good education is not of value in itself – even if it does not lead to someone getting a better job than they may have got otherwise.

But perhaps it is interesting to reflect on how in the space of barely 40 years, the time someone routinely spends in education has increased. Once, a basic education ended at 15; now few teenagers are completely out of the system.


Young MKs gain insights in the US for their work in the Knesset

Itzik ShmulyFour young MKs flew to the US last week to learn about the American system and Jewish community, and plan to return in a week with insights to enrich their work in the Knesset.

MKs Amir Ohana (Likud), Sharren Haskel (Likud),Merav Ben-Ari (Kulanu) and Itzik Shmuly (Zionist Union) were in the US – first in Washington, then New York, and on Monday will travel to Chapel Hill, North Carolina, before returning to Washington. The trip is sponsored by the International Visitor Leadership Program, a project of the US State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

The lawmakers, freshmen except for Shmuly who is serving his second term, and all below age 40, learned about the US government system from academics and consultants, and are expected to meet members of Congress. They also met with leaders of AIPAC, J Street, the American Jewish Committee and the Arab-American Institute.

Shmuly spoke to The Jerusalem Post from New York about the trip that he said he found fascinating and eye-opening.

The Zionist Union MK said two topics were frequently raised: The two-state solution and Jewish religious pluralism.

“In every meeting, with almost everyone we met, [the two-state solution] came up,” he recounted.

“The good thing is that in America, it doesn’t matter who the president will be, the country is totally committed to the idea of two states… even though on the Israeli side there are opinions for and against it.”

Shmuly said that it is clear that the US is focused on other things with a presidential election coming up later this year, but that the two-state solution is the only longterm strategy as far as Americans are concerned.

As for tensions between the ultra-Orthodox and non-Orthodox streams of Judaism in Israel, Shmuly said: “We met with representatives from all different backgrounds in the Jewish community, and grew to understand how this [issue] is a central element of Israel’s relations with the Jewish community in America. Not everyone had the same response to the issue, but it came up constantly.”

Many of the Jewish Americans he met were “hurt and insulted” as a result of this conflict, a feeling that was “justified,” Shmuly said.

“It can’t be that you’re Jewish enough to make aliya and serve in the army, or Jewish enough to support Israel from afar, because the advocacy and lobbying work is a great contribution to our security, but not Jewish enough to be recognized by the State of Israel as such,” he argued. “We talked to people here who have a record of decades of activism for Israel and Jewish communities [in the US], and understood how important the topic is to them.”

Shmuly said that while being an MK is “never boring” because of security issues and his commitment to lowering the cost of living, he plans to add religious pluralism to his priorities.

“We need to push more on these topics and understand the strategic and moral importance of our connection with the Jewish community in America and around the world,” he said.

Last week, the Social Guard, a Knesset watchdog NGO, ranked Shmuly as the MK who deals the most with social issues.

Against that background and focus, he finds the current US election campaign fascinating – especially Sen. Bernie Sanders’s candidacy for the Democratic nomination – though he did clarify that as an Israeli lawmaker he is not endorsing anyone.

America is lacking in “things that look obvious” to Israelis, Shmuly said.

“It’s true that there are things that need to be fixed in the Israeli economy… but there are things that we take for granted, like public healthcare, basic welfare services – even if people are trying to reduce them,” he stated. “I respect that individualism is very important to Americans, but I have a lot of questions. What makes [Americans] live as a community? Doesn’t there need to be a level of solidarity in every society? These things are fascinating to learn about.”

According to Shmuly, Sanders’s appeal comes from such questions, from “middle-to-lower class people, young people and people from the weaker sectors who cannot fulfill the American dream as well as they should. They are creating the momentum toward Sanders.”

The Zionist Union MK did criticize Sanders’s exaggeration last week of the death toll (initially, he said 10,000) in Gaza during 2014’s Operation Cast Lead, and noted that it come up in major American news sources.

“The minute a candidate throws a number like that in the air without checking it is definitely disturbing,” he said. “I hope this was just a mistake of numbers and that there isn’t something else behind it. If someone is coming from a point of view of wanting to solve a complex problem, he can’t just throw abstract ideas in the air. It needs to be taken seriously with in-depth understanding.”


Young Adults Swipe Right on Tinder, but Is It Just a Game?

Young Adults Swipe Right on Tinder, but Is It Just a Game?

Online dating services are now hip with young adults, but not always for dating.

Credit mobile dating apps such as Tinder, which incorporate fun elements and are dead simple to use. Swipe right on a profile picture to approve and swipe left to reject. No awkward messages to each other unless both say yes.

But instead of just looking for long-term love, some people are turning to these services for one-night stands and even advice from locals when traveling. Others just want to look at sexy – and not-so-sexy – pics when they’re bored.

“It’s turned into a game,” said Tim Smith, a 21-year-old student from Hampstead, Maryland.

When he’s bored, he turns to Tinder to start swiping on women in the app, even when he doesn’t feel like talking to anyone.

(Also see:  This Is How You Look While Swiping Through Tinder)

Young adults, ages 18 to 24, traditionally haven’t been big online daters. They haven’t had much of a need, as they are typically surrounded by other young, single people, whether at work or school, said Aaron Smith, associate research director with the Pew Research Center. Tinder and rivals such as Hinge are changing the dynamics, and young adults are using online dating in greater numbers than any other age group these days.

In 2013, only 10 percent in that age group used online dating. That rose to 27 percent in the latest Pew study, which was released Thursday. By comparison, only 15 percent of US adults overall have used dating sites or apps, just a slight increase from 11 percent in 2013. (If that seems low, it’s because the entire US population is surveyed, including people who are already coupled. For people who have never been married, 30 percent have used online dating.)

Stanford University professor Michael Rosenfeld wrote in a 2012 paper that the Internet could be helpful for people in “thin” dating markets, ones with relatively fewer options for possible partners in their regular life. That includes gays, lesbians and middle-aged straight people, he said.

“Conversely, single people (college students, for example) who are fortunate enough to inhabit an environment full of eligible potential partners may not need to actively search for partners at all,” he wrote.

But newer dating apps seem to have made it fun for young people to use – or at least pass the time.

Alfred Mohi, 24, said he has used Tinder for flings with people he doesn’t want to see again, and for the emotional high of matching and talking with women he deems attractive.

“I don’t know how to say this without sounding like a scumbag, but I used it as a confidence boost,” he said.

But he said he wouldn’t use Tinder to find a significant other, because he believes it’s harder to trust people you meet on the app.

Others describe Tinder as convenient and fun, and possibly a route to a relationship – but there are obstacles. “A lot of guys will message just terrible things, right off the bat,” said Maddie Forshee, a 21-year-old-student in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She said she’s been sent naked photos – “It’s like, I don’t want to see that.”

Tinder owner Match Group says half of Tinder users are ages 18 to 24, while 85 percent are 18 to 34.

Tinder seems built to sneak young people into online dating. “I wouldn’t even call it dating – I don’t think you need to call it dating,” said Amarnath Thombre, Match Group’s Chief Strategy Officer. “You enter like you’re trying to play a game and then you end up dating people. It’s more like a psychological switch.”

Pew’s survey shows that some older adults are also more interested in online dating. Usage among 55 to 64 doubled to 12 percent. Pew’s Smith said they probably feel more comfortable with the idea of finding a partner on the Internet as they hear about successful matches from friends and relatives.

Of course, there are exceptions: Edward Stern, a 62-year-old New Yorker, said he has been an online dater for decades and finds more cynicism today.

“I could tell you what it was like in the ’90s. People weren’t as afraid or distrustful,” he said. “That’s my biggest impression of what’s going on today. You have to pull teeth to get people to meet you.”

He said he typically ends up going out with women in their 20s, because those are the ones who respond to him. He says he’s happy with “fun” rather than a long-term relationship.

Pew conducted the survey June 10 to July 12, 2015, with 2,001 US adults. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish. The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 2.5 percentage points.

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