New app allows two-factor authentication for all apps

Rivetz Authenticator protects your identity using the secure hardware

The traditional method of using a username and password is no longer sufficient to protect your banking, social media, emails and other digital accounts. Passwords can easily be forgotten or even stolen, making two-factor authentication are integral in protecting your identity and online account access.

Two-factor authentication (2FA) does an excellent job securing your digital accounts, but what happens when your phone is stolen or gets misplaced? Or what if you’re updating to a new device and have to re-authenticate everything? And, even if you have the keys saved, manually resetting two-factor authentication for every account is going to take its fair share of time.

Rivetz is a mobile cybersecurity specialist that is ending all your 2FA woes with the launch of a new Authenticator app. Rivetz’s Authenticator app is the first two-factor authentication solution with backup and recovery. The app recovers 2FA keys using a mobile’s existing hardware security capabilities, while also giving you complete control over encrypted backup files. The app was created to eliminate frustrations users face with their 2FA accounts when migrating to new devices.

While 2FA apps generate their code in software, Rivetz Authenticator generates codes in a phone’s hardware chipset, protecting them from phishing attacks, malware and the other threats. This secure hardware chipset is called Trusted Execution Environment, which is already embedded in millions of Android devices. The app also features a Trusted User Interface (TUI) for supported devices that ensures malware doesn’t infect a transaction.

Rivetz Authenticators is engineered from scratch, using hardware-based trusted processing. It is compatible with all your favourite online services like Twitter, Facebook, Gmail, Coinbase, Binance, work accounts and more. The Authenticators also monitors the state of your device for changes caused by spyware or malicious malware software, and will instantly notify you if any such change is detected. You can save all your services as encrypted backups and easily recover then if your phone is lost or stolen. Rivetz strongly believes in prioritising privacy, which is the primary reason why the app functions offline within your device.

[“source=moneycontrol”]

Facebook Says SMS Spam Received by Two-Factor Authentication Users Was a Bug

Facebook Says SMS Spam Received by Two-Factor Authentication Users Was a Bug

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Facebook users had been getting SMS notifications after signing up for 2F
  • Users’ responses to notifications would appear as status updates on Faceb
  • Facebook acknowledged the issue and promised a fix

Facebook users, over the past week, have reportedly been getting SMS notifications from the social media website after signing up for the two-factor authentication security feature. While the two-factor authentication is a vital part of protecting online accounts by adding a second layer of security, the text messages, interestingly, were not related to any security features. This gave rise to speculation that Facebook was trying to increase user engagement However, Facebook has now responded to the issue saying that it was a bug, and that such notifications were not meant to be sent.

While two-factor authentication is considered a vital measure of security, requiring an attacker to have both the user’s password and physical access to a registered device before being able to log into the user’s account. However, on Facebook, the system appears to have ended up being a problem for its users, thanks to SMS notifications. Interestingly, users also complained that if they replied to the SMS notifications, these would appear as status updates on Facebook.

Alex Stamos, Facebook Chief Security Officer, explains in a blog post that it was not Facebook’s intention to send non-security-related SMS notifications to phone numbers, and also apologised for the inconvenience caused to users. He wrote, “The last thing we want is for people to avoid helpful security features because they fear they will receive unrelated notifications.”

Facebook has also promised that the bug will be fixed soon. “We are working to ensure that people who sign up for two-factor authentication won’t receive non-security-related notifications from us unless they specifically choose to receive them, and the same will be true for those who signed up in the past. We expect to have the fixes in place in the coming days,” said Stamos.

Responding to why users responses to SMS notifications would appear as status updates, Facebook again said it was an unintended consequence, and was enabled by an older functionality where users could post to Facebook via text message. This functionality would soon be deprecated, Facebook said.

While you wait for Facebook to come out with a fix, you can go to Settings > Notifications to switch off text notifications. You can also use a code generator app and a U2F key instead of providing your phone numbers to Facebook when enabling 2FA.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]