TRAI, BEREC Sign Memorandum on Preserving, Promoting Net Neutrality Rules

TRAI, BEREC Sign Memorandum on Preserving, Promoting Net Neutrality Rules

Left to Right: BEREC OAM Laszlo Igneczi, TRAI Chairman R.S. Sharma, BEREC Chair Johannes Gungl

HIGHLIGHTS

  • TRAI and BEREC met on Thursday in Poland
  • The two announced their common understanding of net neutrality
  • They also collaborated to develop effective regulations

Telecom regulators from India and the European Union (EU) met this week to announce their common understanding of the “building blocks of net neutralityrules”, and their intention to collaborate on regulations. Representatives of Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) and the Body of European Regulators for Electronics Communication (BEREC) on Thursday in Sopat, Poland signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) to “advocate for effective electronics communications regulation.” The two also released a “Joint Statement for the Open Internet”, that defined the heretofore mentioned building blocks.

The MoU was said to show the willingness of both sides to develop regular exchanges regarding the implementation and preservation of net neutrality rules. The regulators said they intend to “promote competitive markets, technological innovation, and value for consumers.”

In their joint statement, TRAI and BEREC listed what they consider to be the foundation of net neutrality rules, common to current frameworks of both India and EU. These included the enforcement of end users’ rights to send or receive information; the equal treatment of traffic; provision for reasonable traffic management if transparent and non-discriminatory; provision for commercial practices such as zero rating if they complement competition and promote an open Internet, and finally, the users’ right to detailed information on Internet providers, prices, as well as current traffic management measures.

The regulators may impose additional requirements allowed by their respective legislative frameworks on top of these building blocks, the joint statement added. Representing the two bodies were TRAI Chairman Dr. Ram Sewak Sharma and BEREC Chair Johannes Gungl. Commenting on the MoU, Gungl said, “Net neutrality is a vital principal and an open internet crucial for people around the globe. We are very happy to have TRAI as a partner to ensure a univocal protection of net neutrality principles for internet access services.”

R.S. Sharma said, “We consider that the internet will continue to be an enabler of growth and innovation for countries like India who can use technology to leapfrog to the next stage of development. Therefore, it is important that the internet is kept as an open and non-discriminatory platform. Our MoU with BEREC gives us an opportunity to not only work closely together in areas like net neutrality, but also to collaborate in areas where the EU has adopted a very effective regulatory framework like consumer protection, broadband development and promotion of NGA rollout.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Waitrose and M&S sign up to ‘ghost gear’ fisheries initiative

fishing regulations

Some 640,000 tonnes of discarded fishing gear is added to oceans every year

Waitrose and M&S have joined Sainsbury’s and Morrisons in signing up to World Animal Protection’s Global Ghost Gear Initiative.

The campaign aims to tackle the growing problem of lost, abandoned or discarded fishing gear – with some 640,000 tonnes added to oceans every year. The announcement coincided with this year’s World Oceans Day on 8 June.

As part of its commitment, M&S would invest in a host of initiatives designed to promote best practice to fight lost gear in its fisheries and improve the reporting, recovery and recycling of lost gear, said a World Animal Protection spokeswoman.

The charity highlighted the crucial role of retailers in tackling the issue of ghost gear by looking at their seafood supply chains and taking measures to reduce pollution. It added it was also in discussions with Tesco about joining its campaign.

Seafood companies urged to improve approach to ‘ghost gear’

“Our customers care about reducing plastic pollution and the health of our oceans. That’s why we’re committed to responsible sourcing, it’s why we’re supporting the Responsible Fishing Scheme and why we’ve joined the GGGI,” said Hannah Macintyre, fisheries and aquaculture manager at M&S.

“As well as funding GGGI’s vital work, we will be working with our suppliers to transform their approach managing their fishing gear and ensuring best practice when it comes to gear marking, disposing of marine litter, recycling old gear and reporting lost kit.”

Head of sustainability and responsible sourcing at Waitrose, Tor Harris, added: “Bringing organisations together to solve the issue of abandoned fishing equipment can only be a good thing for marine life. Responsible sourcing is a top priority for us so this is a positive step for the environment and the future of sustainable fishing.”

Ghost gear affected more than 800 species of marine life, according to a report released in March by World Animal Protection. It estimated between 5%-30% of the decline in some fish stocks was caused by the issue.

Discarded nets, pots and lines represented more than 70% of all the floating macroplastics in the ocean and cause the deaths of more than 100,000 whales, dolphins, seals and turtles every year through entanglement, the report said.

[“Source-thegrocer”]