Sharp Aquos Zero uses an in-house developed curved OLED with a huge notch

Sharp’s latest smartphone was unveiled in Japan today. It’s the Aquos Zero, which features the company’s first OLED panel designed and manufactured in-house.

It’s a curved 6.2-inch 1440×2992 screen with support for the DCI-P3 color space and Dolby Vision, and as you can see it comes with a huge notch. Not just that, but the parts of the top bezel that are to the left and right of it are pretty substantial too, at least by the usual notched smartphone standards.

Oh, and there’s also a chin. Anyway, enough about that. Thanks to its magnesium frame and aramid fiber back it weighs just 146g, and Sharp is clearly proud of this achievement, boasting about how this is one of the lightest flagships around. By the way, for reference, note that Kevlar is a type of aramid fiber although Sharp doesn’t mention that brand anywhere in its marketing materials so we’re assuming it didn’t pay DuPont the associated licensing fees.

The Aquos Zero is powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 chipset (what else?), paired with 6GB of RAM and 128GB of UFS storage. Its battery has 3,130 mAh capacity and the phone runs Android 9 Pie. Its dimensions are 154 x 73 x 8.8 mm.

The single rear camera has 22.6 MP resolution and f/1.9 aperture, while the selfie cam is an 8 MP unit. The Aquos Zero is IP68 certified for water and dust resistance. A fingerprint scanner is on the back of the handset, and it also has a face unlock system. Stereo speakers are in too, with Dolby Atmos technology.

The Sharp Aquos Zero will be available in Japan by the end of the year. There’s no telling if it will be offered elsewhere at any point – but since the company now has a presence in Europe, maybe we’ll see it there in the future.

[“source”=gsmarena]

Foxconn Gets Green Light From China’s Antitrust Regulator for Sharp Deal

 

Foxconn Gets Green Light From China's Antitrust Regulator for Sharp Deal

Taiwanese tech giant Hon Hai said antitrust authorities in China had approved its takeover of ailing Japanese electronics maker Sharp, clearing the last obstacle to the drawn-out deal.

The purchase, which was supposed to close last month, has reportedly been held up by China – one of the countries that was reviewing the deal over concerns that it could lead to a monopoly on LCD screens.

Hon Hai gains Sharp’s cutting-edge LCD panel technologywith the $3.5-billion buyout, giving it a 66 percent controlling stake.

“Our application for antitrust review in various regions is completed,” the company said in a statement to the Taiwan stock exchange late Thursday.

“Both sides will carry out the handover procedures as soon as possible according to the contract,” it said.

The announcement fulfills an ambition of Hon Hai founder Terry Gou, whose firm first pursued Sharpfour years ago.

Gou’s company – also known as Foxconn – is the world’s biggest electronics supplier, with Apple a key customer for smartphone components.

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But the smartphone giant is squeezing its suppliers as sales of its iPhones slow, dropping 15 percent last quarter year-on-year.

Hon Hai shares slumped in Taipei Friday on weaker-than-expected quarterly earnings.

“From the results, we can see that Apple is pressuring its supply chain on prices,” Fubon analysts led by Arthur Liao said in a note.

Hon Hai said Thursday that its net profit dropped 31 percent to TWD 17.7 billion ($565 million) in the April-June period, the third straight quarterly decline.

It missed the TWD 24.6 billion estimate by analysts polled by Bloomberg News.

Shares slumped 3.69 percent Friday. underperforming the benchmark index.

Analysts are expecting better performance in the third quarter, when Apple’s new iPhone 7 series is rumoured to be launched.

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Tags: Apple, Foxconn, Home Entertainment, Hon Hai, Laptops, Mobiles, PC, Sharp, Tablets, iPhones

 

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Why would Foxconn buy Sharp? It’s all about the iPhone


Japanese electronics maker Sharp has accepted a bid from Taiwan’s Foxconn Technology Group for it to buy a majority stake in company for ¥489 billion ($4.4 billion), the Japanese firm announced today (Feb. 25). Shortly thereafter, however, Foxconn put the deal on hold “after receiving new material information from Sharp,” it said in a statement.
“We will have to postpone any signing of a definitive agreement until we have arrived at a satisfactory understanding and resolution of the situation,” Foxconn added. Is this a negotiating tactic or a sign that the purported takeover—a bailout, really, given the deep discount offered to Foxconn—has already unravelled? No immediate answer was forthcoming from the companies, but sources told the Wall Street Journal (paywall) that large contingent liabilities at Sharp—worth perhaps billions of dollars—only recently came to light, spooking Foxconn execs. Including debt, the deal could be worth some ¥700 billion overall.
The transaction has been years in the making, with the earliest failed takeover dating back to 2012. Its apparent completion has brought about some controversy in Japan, where foreign acquisitions of domestic tech firms remain unpopular. If it goes through, the deal would mark a key win for both Apple and Foxconn.

Foxconn assembles the iPhone—Apple’s best-selling product and the world’s most profitable smartphone—and also manufactures some of its components. These are goods and services it sells to Apple as part of its “bill of materials.”
The crown jewel in that bill is the screen—by far the most expensive part of an iPhone.

Foxconn doesn’t make displays. But Sharp does. So do LG, Samsung, and other electronics companies, some of whom make Android devices that compete with the iPhone.
By acquiring Sharp, Foxconn could earn an even larger portion of the overall bill of materials for the iPhone. Apple would also benefit from the deal because it could buy iPhone screens from a partner, rather than a competitor like LG, from whom it currently buys screens. It might also be able to buy the displays for less than what LG or Samsung would charge for them, because of bulk purchasing benefits from Foxconn.
This could ultimately make the iPhone much cheaper to make—though not necessarily cheaper to buy. Apple won’t necessarily pass along the savings to its relatively price-insensitive customers.

[“source-Qz”]