Samsung Max App With Data Saving and Privacy Protection Features Released

Samsung Max App With Data Saving and Privacy Protection Features Released

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Samsung Max app has been released
  • The app is available for select Galaxy devices
  • Replaces the Opera Max app on Galaxy A and Galaxy J handsets

Samsung on Friday released an Android app that is designed to offer mobile data savings and privacy management. Called Samsung Max, the new app is designed by Samsung R&D Institute India and is available for free download on Google Play and Galaxy App store for select Galaxy devices. The proprietary app will also come preloaded on all Galaxy A and Galaxy J series handsets in a few emerging markets, including India, Argentina, Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, South Africa, Thailand, and Vietnam – replacing the recently discontinued Opera Max app.

Similar to Google’s Datally that was launched in last November, the Samsung Max offers foreground data compression service that allows you to reduce data consumption from your installed apps. The app also has the functionality to block background data and data access for any app. It compresses webpages, photos, videos, and media within apps and browser to drop data consumption. Similarly, it lets you manage data permissions for specific apps and customise data consumption for existing apps to save your data for other useful tasks.

Alongside offering data savings and data compression features, Samsung Max provides regular reports to let you see which of your favourite apps are consuming the most of your data limit. The app also has a boost Wi-Fi feature that is touted to uplift connectivity even in a crowded Wi-Fi hotspot or at a weak signal area.

Samsung has provided a bunch of features that are specific to security as well. Primarily, the Samsung Max app not just compress but also encrypt all the network traffic that flows from your apps using Samsung’s in-house servers. The South Korean company also claims that has been using a “bank-grade”, secure network experience. In the same vein, there is Samsung Max’ data-savings cloud access make data usage efficient and secure from third-party services.

The Samsung Max app encrypts data when it is sent through a public Wi-Fi network. Likewise, there are features such as tracker blocking and DNS masking to offer a secured Web browsing experience. You can view privacy reports to see how the app adds security to other apps and network connections.

While the Samsung Max by default serves ads, you can choose whether to view ads inside the app or on the lock screen only while your device is plugged in and charging. The latter can be enabled by switching to the premium mode.

“At Samsung, we’ve been committed to creating inclusive data saving and privacy protection services for all our devices. Because of this, we are now introducing Samsung Max to our mid-range devices as an exclusive and unique service that sets Samsung devices apart from the rest of the smartphone market,” said Seounghoon Oh, Vice President Samsung R&D Institute India.

It is worth noting here that the Samsung Max app is presently incompatible with devices other than the eligible Samsung devices. You can check whether it is compatible with your Galaxy handset by visiting Google Play or Galaxy App store.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

HTC Announces UH OH Protection for When an Oopsie Occurs

htc-one-m9

Back on March 1, HTC announced the new HTC One M9. Now today, March 18, a tweet from the president of HTC Americas, Jason Mackenzie, promises big news for the company’s new flagship smartphone.

So what is this big news?

It’s the UH OH Protection plan. This new protection plan will cover more than standard damage that could occur to your HTC One M9. The plan does include free replacement if your phone gets cracked or damaged by water.

But this plan takes things a step further. UH OH Protection also offers a free replacement if you change carriers within the first 12 months of purchase.

That is pretty great.

The HTC One M9 is promising to be a real competitor. HTC’s flagship smartphone features an all-metal body, 5-inch full HD display, and a 20 MP camera with sapphire camera cover. Specs include Qualcomm Snapdragon 810, octa-core 64-bit, 4×2.0GHz+4×1.5GHz. It also boasts 32GB of storage, 3GB of RAM, and micro SD up to 2TB.

There is no official ship date or price yet. For those interested in knowing more carriers, AT&T, Sprint, Verizon, and T-Mobile all have registration pages where you can sign up for the latest news.

Update March 18, 2015:

During a special live presentation HTC released more information regarding the HTC One M9 and UH OH Protection. HTC announced that UH OH Protection will be launching with the HTC One M9 starting April 10, 2015. See the full announcement from HTC below:

After it’s release, UH OH Protection will also cover the M8. UH OH Protection costs nothing and comes free with purchase of M8s and M9s.

HTC also revealed that users who do not use UH OH Protection within the first 12 months of purchasing their phone will get $100 off the purchase of their next HTC One phone. There is no trade in necessary in order to get the credit. This credit will need to be used in the next 12 months after the UH OH Protection expires.

Image: HTC

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Facebook Wins Privacy Case Against Belgian Data Protection Authority

Facebook Wins Privacy Case Against Belgian Data Protection Authority

The Belgian data protection authority on Wednesday lost a legal battle with Facebook in which it sought to stop the social network from tracking the online activities of non-Facebook users in Belgium who visit the social network’s pages.

The Belgian Privacy Commission said the Brussels Appeals Court had dismissed its case on the grounds that the regulator has no jurisdiction over Facebook Inc, which has its European headquarters in Ireland.

That marks a victory for the US company, which staunchly maintained that only the Irish Data Protection Commissioner has jurisdiction over how it uses Europeans’ data.

Facebook has had run-ins with a number of European privacy watchdogs over its use of people’s data.

Belgium’s data protection regulator took Facebook to court a year ago, accusing it of trampling on EUprivacy law by tracking people without a Facebook account without their consent.

The court ruled in favour of the regulator and ordered Facebook to stop tracking non-Facebook users when they visited a Facebook page or face a EUR 250,000 ($277,000 or roughly Rs. 1.8 crores) daily fine.

Facebook appealed the ruling. In the meantime it said it would comply and stop using the so-called ‘datr’ cookie which it places on people’s browsers when they visit a Facebook.com site or click a Facebook ‘Like’ button on other websites, allowing it to track the online activities of that browser.

“We are pleased with the court’s decision and look forward to bringing all our services back online for people in Belgium,” a Facebook spokeswoman said.

The Belgian regulator said it would look into launching a final appeal with the Court of Cassation, which can throw out previous judgements but not deliver new ones.

“Today’s decision simply and purely means that the Belgian citizen cannot obtain the protection of his private life through the courts and tribunals when it concerns foreign actors,” the regulator said in a statement.

It added that the Court of Cassation had previously overruled the Court of Appeal on matters of jurisdiction over foreign companies.

“Thus the citizen is also exposed to massive violations of private life,” said Willem Debeuckelaere, president of the Belgian Privacy Commission.

The Brussels appeals court also threw out the Belgian Privacy Commission’s claim that the case was urgent and required expedited procedure.

© Thomson Reuters 2016

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Tags: Apps, Data Protection, EU, Facebook, Privacy, Social
[“Source-Gadgets”]

Facebook Wins Privacy Case Against Belgian Data Protection Authority

Facebook Wins Privacy Case Against Belgian Data Protection Authority

The Belgian data protection authority on Wednesday lost a legal battle with Facebook in which it sought to stop the social network from tracking the online activities of non-Facebook users in Belgium who visit the social network’s pages.

The Belgian Privacy Commission said the Brussels Appeals Court had dismissed its case on the grounds that the regulator has no jurisdiction over Facebook Inc, which has its European headquarters in Ireland.

That marks a victory for the US company, which staunchly maintained that only the Irish Data Protection Commissioner has jurisdiction over how it uses Europeans’ data.

Facebook has had run-ins with a number of European privacy watchdogs over its use of people’s data.

Belgium’s data protection regulator took Facebook to court a year ago, accusing it of trampling on EUprivacy law by tracking people without a Facebook account without their consent.

The court ruled in favour of the regulator and ordered Facebook to stop tracking non-Facebook users when they visited a Facebook page or face a EUR 250,000 ($277,000 or roughly Rs. 1.8 crores) daily fine.

Facebook appealed the ruling. In the meantime it said it would comply and stop using the so-called ‘datr’ cookie which it places on people’s browsers when they visit a Facebook.com site or click a Facebook ‘Like’ button on other websites, allowing it to track the online activities of that browser.

“We are pleased with the court’s decision and look forward to bringing all our services back online for people in Belgium,” a Facebook spokeswoman said.

The Belgian regulator said it would look into launching a final appeal with the Court of Cassation, which can throw out previous judgements but not deliver new ones.

“Today’s decision simply and purely means that the Belgian citizen cannot obtain the protection of his private life through the courts and tribunals when it concerns foreign actors,” the regulator said in a statement.

It added that the Court of Cassation had previously overruled the Court of Appeal on matters of jurisdiction over foreign companies.

“Thus the citizen is also exposed to massive violations of private life,” said Willem Debeuckelaere, president of the Belgian Privacy Commission.

The Brussels appeals court also threw out the Belgian Privacy Commission’s claim that the case was urgent and required expedited procedure.

© Thomson Reuters 2016

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Tags: Apps, Data Protection, EU, Facebook, Privacy, Social
[“Source-Gadgets”]