Admission at 11 Chandigarh colleges to go online

The UT higher education department decided to introduce the online system in colleges.

In what could be a good news for the college applicants of 2018-19 academic session, starting July 2018, there will be no counselling for any of the courses, this year.

Unlike last year, when applicants of all the streams, be it sciences, arts or commerce had to be present for the counselling to deposit their documents, this year, the entire admission process, starting from buying a prospectus, has been made online.

Rakesh Kumar Popli, director higher education, said, “We will release the college admission schedule in a day or two but this year, students will not have to physically come for the counselling.”

He added, “We have taken help of software, created by Society for Promotion of IT in Chandigarh (SPIC) for the convenience of the students and parents.”

‘Students can submit forms by mid-June’

Meanwhile, Anita Kaushal, principal of Post Graduate Government College for Girls, Sector 11, who is the chairperson of the college admission committee, said, “The admission process will begin from July 9 and prospectuses will be made available from the first week of June and students can submit their forms online by mid June.”

She added, “We have included sciences comprising BSc and all other subjects under BSc, computer sciences, masters programme in computers, commerce and then arts will also be online from the new session. The admission dates will be shared in two days.”

Kaushal also stated that the word ‘counselling’ will remain there in the prospectus and it will mean the day, when students will come to pay their fee. Rest everything will be handled online,” she added.

At present GGDSD College, Sector 32, has a facility of online admission, where a student does not have to visit the campus with documents on the day of admission. At SD college, the fee deposition process is also online.

The UT higher education department had drafted a plan to introduce online admissions in city’s 11 colleges.

PU faced difficulties to go online last year

In 2017, Panjab University, had also started their online admissions but faced difficulties in implementing it. Despite introducing cloud-based online system, the university had to ask students to submit hard copies of forms and the documents. The system was criticised by the student bodies, stating that there was no point of introducing an online system when students are asked to handover the hard copies of their application forms and documents.

[“source=hindustantimes”]

Providing CMOs Insights Across All Online Marketplaces: Jumpshot’s New “Insights” Product Now Enables Brands to Benchmark Against Competitors

Image result for New analytics tool reports consumers make over 50 percent of their online retail purchases on e-commerce sites like Amazon and Walmart.com

SAN FRANCISCOMarch 21, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Jumpshot, the only company that unlocks walled-garden data, today announced the company has broadened its data offering to enable marketing professionals who manage brands to benchmark against competitors by understanding purchase behavior, all the way down to the brand and category level. From search engines and online marketplaces to competitive websites, the new solution, called “Insights,” allows marketers to map purchasing behavior online identifying their path to buy even within walled gardens.

Some examples of how this product is applied:

  • While overall purchases for Nintendo products were down across all online retailers in February by about 20 percent year-over-year, Target.com saw an 80 percent year-over-year growth for these products.
  • Though Amazon saw a 30 percent growth in pet supply purchases year-over-year, purchases on Chewy.com more than doubled from the year prior.

“Consumers make over 50 percent of their online retail purchases on sites like Amazon and Walmart.com, and that number is continuing to grow,” said Deren Baker, CEO of Jumpshot. “Our clients have increasingly used Jumpshot to better understand their target customers’ purchasing behavior, wherever they go online, and now we’re taking that a step further – allowing brands to also get insights into how their competitor’s products are purchased.”

Jumpshot’s Insights solution enables marketers to:

  • Benchmark your brand against competitors. Understand how and where you’re losing out in the purchase cycle to the competition. Compare your performance to competitors — by domain, brand or category — at every step of the funnel on any site to pinpoint strengths and weaknesses. This includes referral sources, keyword search and upstream analytics.
  • Improve your brand conversion funnels everywhere. Analyze each step of the path to purchase across retail, travel, and other types of websites. From visit to conversion, see where users drop off, where they get stuck, and how long they take to convert on all leading marketplaces.
  • Understand cross-visitation behaviors. With insight into consumer purchasing behaviors throughout the entire web, marketers can understand where and why their customers are buying if not on their own site. Pulling back and looking at cross-site visitations by category can reveal an even broader picture that offers meaningful insights across an entire vertical.

About Jumpshot:
Jumpshot delivers digital intelligence from within the Internet’s most valuable walled gardens. The company’s real-time, global panel of 100 million devices tracks five billion actions a day to deliver insights into online behavior from every consumer action. Jumpshot works with customers including Condé Nast, Kantar, TripAdvisor, Moz, SEMrush, IRi, and GFK, among others. Learn more about Jumpshot at www.jumpshot.com.

[“Source-prnewswire”]

How to Link Aadhaar With PAN Card Online to File Tax Returns

How to Link Aadhaar With PAN Card Online to File Tax Returns

HIGHLIGHTS

  • You can link your Aadhaar and PAN via the e-filing website
  • For this to work, your PAN and Aadhaar details need to match
  • In case of a discrepancy, you will soon be able to link via OTP

With July 31 here, it is high time you file your IT returns for the 2017 fiscal. Of course, before you can go ahead with filing income tax returns, you need to link Aadhaar number and PAN card as it became mandatory from July 1. According to a new amendment to the tax proposals in the Finance Bill for 2017-18, anyone who has a PAN card must provide their Aadhaar number to the principal director general of income tax (systems) or DGIT (systems). If you want to link the two but are not sure how to do it, you can use the e-facility launched by the Income Tax department, which is the easiest way to link the two. In fact, you don’t even need to sign in to the IT website to link your Aadhaar number and PAN card.

ALSO SEEHow to Link Aadhaar and PAN card by SMS

How to link PAN card with Aadhaar online

If you want to link your Aadhaar with PAN card, head over to the Income Tax e-filing portal and follow the steps below:

  1. On the website, click on the link on the left saying Link Aadhaar.
  2. Now, enter your PAN number, Aadhaar number, name as per Aadhaar, and the Captcha, and then click on Link Aadhaar.
  3. This should link the PAN and Aadhaar, but if there is any discrepancy in your details, you’ll receive an Aadhaar OTP to confirm the linkage. Enter the OTP and click on Save to continue.
  4. You can also link the details after logging in to the income tax website. Log in as you normally would and then click on Profile Settings in the top menu.
  5. Next, find Link Aadhaar.
  6. Enter your Aadhaar number and click on Save to continue.

This will only work if the details on the PAN and the Aadhaar card match. In case of any discrepancies, you can upload a scan of your PAN card, or register via OTP on your linked mobile number as mentioned above.

ALSO SEEWondering How to Pay or File Income Tax Returns Online? These Websites Can Help

That’s all there is to it right now. Did this guide help you in linking your PAN to your Aadhaar card? Let us know via the comments, and check out the rest of our How-to articles.

The process of linking Aadhaar and PAN is, of course, mandatory only if you plan to file tax returns on July 1 or later. This means you can choose to file the tax returns today, and need not link the two IDs. Also, according to the Supreme Court ruling, those who do not have not been allotted Aadhaar number yet need not scramble for it, as the process is only for Aadhaar-holders. This has come as a major relief for those worried whether their PAN cards would become invalid if they do not link the two by July 1.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Social Media and Shopping: Report Provides Potential Insights on North Korean Online Behavior

Image result for Social Media and Shopping: Report Provides Potential Insights on North Korean Online BehaviorA new report offers fascinating insight into Internet activity from North Korea, suggesting that average North Koreans and the upper echelons of the Workers’ Party and military aren’t nearly as cut off as commonly portrayed. However, no definitive conclusions can be drawn from the report about the source, frequency and range of this access because it doesn’t provide hard numbers for many of its conclusions and the raw data isn’t available. That is unfortunate because the findings are counter-intuitive to what we have assumed about North Korean online behavior. Opening the data to peer review may help us better understand the nature and scale of this activity and, if confirmed, could change the way the world deals with North Korea.

Findings

The report was published in July by the Insikt Group, the research arm of Massachusetts-based Recorded Future. The company utilizes machine learning to deliver online security threat intelligence to businesses. The basis for the report was Internet traffic captured outside of North Korea by Team Cymru, a computer security-focused non-profit that acts as Insikt’s “intelligence partner.”

In the report, researcher Priscilla Moriuchi, the director of strategic threat development at Recorded Future and a 12-year veteran of the US intelligence community, writes that users in North Korea spend much of their time online checking social media. Facebook was the most often accessed site with Google, Baidu and Instagram all attracting significant numbers of views. Alibaba, Amazon, Tencent and Apple rounded out the top eight social networking sites over the period of the data, which spanned April 1 to July 6 this year.

Just on April 1, for example, the report notes users accessed 163.com email accounts, streamed Chinese-language video from Youku and checked news on Xinhua and People’s Daily.

Team Cymru was vague about how it captured the data and exactly what it consisted of, but it has previously said it works with “data donors and sources.” It also declined to provide a copy of the North Korean data without subscription to its commercial service. But the report did provide details of how it decided what was “North Korean” traffic and it comes down to three blocks of Internet addresses.

  • The first was a block of 1,024 Internet addresses from 175.45.176.0 to 175.45.179.255. Those are addresses allocated to Star JV, North Korea’s sole Internet provider. All of the country’s websites sit within this range and it’s also used by the Koryolink 3G service for Internet access offered to resident foreigners and tourists.
  • The second was a smaller block of 256 addresses from 210.52.109.0 to 210.52.109.255. These are Chinese addresses but have been allocated to North Korea’s state-run telecom provider through China Netcom since before Star JV existed. North Korean websites sat in these addresses about 15 years ago.
  • The third group was another 256 addresses from 77.94.35.0 to 77.94.35.255. These are allocated to SatNet, a Russian satellite Internet provider and are currently registered as being used in Lebanon. In the past, these were registered as being used by North Korea, but information in the Internet address registration database isn’t verified so it’s unproven whether these were or are legitimate North Korean addresses.

Moriuchi feels sure the SatNet addresses were in use by North Korea during the time the data was collected and points to the similarity in access patterns between the SatNet addresses and the Star JV addresses; she didn’t see any traffic targeted at Lebanese websites, as might be expected. Again, the baseline data wasn’t available to illustrate or support that assertion. Moriuchi told me, however, that the SatNet traffic made up about 40 percent of the data with just 1 percent coming from the China Netcom block. The rest came from the North Korean IP range and that, if taken alone, would still support the general findings of the report.

Among Moriuchi’s research, she found a larger-than-expected amount of traffic from North Korea to India, Malaysia, New Zealand, Nepal, Kenya and Mozambique. She said the amount of access was higher than would typically be expected and directed at sites such as a local news outlets and governments—the kind of sites only someone living there or with a link to the country might access.

In fact, one fifth of all activity observed in the data involved India—a surprising amount. According to the report, the traffic suggests North Korea has students at least seven universities and might be working with several research institutions in the country.

Of the countries mentioned, Malaysia and Indonesia also maintain diplomatic missions in North Korea, although Malaysia brought diplomats home as relations with Pyongyang broke down in the wake of the murder of Kim Jong Nam in Kuala Lumpur.

Perhaps most intriguingly, on May 17, Bitcoin mining traffic was observed. There had been none since the beginning of April but it suddenly spiked. The report notes the close timing with the release of the “WannaCry” malware that hit computers between May 12 and 15. WannaCry demanded a ransom in Bitcoin and was linked to North Korea by computer security companies.

The report also noted the use of at least seven different western VPN (virtual private network) services in traffic among the data. Such services require a credit card subscription, which isn’t impossible for a North Korean to arrange through overseas contacts, but again raises the question of who is behind the traffic.

The report notes, “one VPN was used by an iPad to check a Gmail account, access Google Cloud, check Facebook and MSN accounts, and view adult content. Other VPN and VPS (virtual private server) were used to run Metasploit (security software), make purchases using Bitcoin, check Twitter, play video games, stream videos, post documents to Dropbox, and browse Amazon.”

Caveats

An important caveat to many of the findings in the report is that it’s unclear how many people were covered and who they are. The report refers to those with Internet access as a “limited number,” but it didn’t acknowledge that several hundred foreigners might be present in Pyongyang at any one time, accessing the Internet and connecting to overseas sites. For them, using VPNs, accessing Facebook and Google and checking 163.com email accounts would be expected.

Moriuchi later told me she did see traffic that appeared to be foreign residents but it was just a small sliver of the overall data. But it’s impossible to know how much because the report doesn’t provide those numbers and Moriuchi wouldn’t disclose them.

Take the Indian traffic, for example. From the data provider, it’s impossible to determine whether the increased activity to India is just bored diplomats at India’s embassy Pyongyang. We also don’t know the amount of data analyzed, the number of websites accessed or even an estimate as to the number of Internet users in Pyongyang.

In a phone conversation, Moriuchi told me the traffic collected represented a significant number of records—it wasn’t just a handful of web sessions each day—but wouldn’t put numbers on it. When I asked her what it might compare to, she said it was about what you might expect from a medium-sized company—which is about 50 to 250 people according to most definitions.

Unanswered Questions

Just like almost everywhere else, Facebook is king for the people inside North Korea that have Internet access, and they also spend a fair amount of time on Google, Baidu and other major sites. If the traffic is really coming from North Koreans rather than resident or visiting foreigners, then they really are very much like us—more than we ever imagined.

However, while the report adds insight into the largely opaque area of access to the Internet from inside North Korea, it’s far from clear exactly what was captured and whether all of it was really from North Koreans.

I’ve spoken to several North Korea and Internet experts about the report and they all draw the same conclusion: that something is not quite right with the numbers. Perhaps a lot more of it is from foreigners than estimated or perhaps there’s an unknown Internet connection that wasn’t taken into account.

Or, perhaps we are all wrong and North Koreans really are going online and checking Amazon and Alibaba. Without more information, it’s impossible to know and that’s unfortunate because of the surprising nature of some of the findings.

Moriuchi says she’s sure about the results reached from the data set—the sites accessed, the traffic patterns, the activity—and I’m sure that’s true. Nonetheless, I’d love to do a deeper dive into the data to gain much greater granularity and insight into some of its conclusions.

[“Source-38north”]