The cofounder of Chairish talks about what’s hot in vintage decor

Anna Brockway, cofounder of online marketplace Chairish and a former vice president at Levi Strauss, is known for her taste-making style and loves flea markets, Delft blue and white planters and Vladimir Kagan mohair sofas. She knows a lot about what vintage and antique pieces are in demand by what people are buying and selling on her site.

Brockway joined staff writer Jura Koncius last week on The Washington Post’s Home Front online chat. Here is an edited excerpt.

Q: What’s trending in art? Is the gallery wall over?

A: Right now, we are seeing lots of interest in Pop art. (Think large-scale, bright colors and ironic takes on commercial themes.)

As for your second question: Long live the gallery wall! We have seen piqued interest in a new take on it, though – more like a tile look where pieces by the same artist in a similar theme, shape and frame are used in large grid configurations. It’s a more sophisticated, and maybe a little calmer, take on the gallery wall approach.

Q: We live in a mid-century home and own almost exclusively pre-1970 furniture/decor. Our family room sofa has seen better days, and we’d like to replace it with a washable slip cover with a mid-century modern look. Do you have any suggestions?

A: I would recommend a simple Lawson (or square) arm sofa with a tailored slipcover. Look for a low profile to match the rest of your design.

Q: I’ve just started antique hunting for my home. What are some vintage home decor items I should look out for?

A: I would recommend starting with vintage rugs, lighting (like table lamps) and occasional pieces (ottomans and small side tables). These will add personal style to your space as you start to develop your own vintage aesthetic and usually aren’t big financial and space commitments.

Q: I love the sturdiness and quality of older furniture. How do I make these pieces more transitional? I see ” just slap some white paint on it” all over Pinterest, but there must be another way to respect the piece and give it a new home.

A: Making traditional brown furniture relevant is all about context. Two tips: I like it when a traditional piece is used in a highly edited room with lots of negative space around the piece. In other words, get rid of the clutter! This allows the beauty, solidity and character of the traditional piece to really be appreciated.

Secondly, surround the piece with a light color. The main thing that you want to avoid is the heavy, all-dark look, and that can be accomplished through the thoughtful use of color.

Q: What’s the trend in vintage metals? Is brass still hot? Is vintage moving to a postmodern phase? Are the 1990s back? What’s your favorite mix of periods, textures and colors?

A: For metals, we’ve seen a sustained interest in brass. But I will say that I love it when folks fearlessly mix metal types for a more eclectic look! It’s tricky, though, and sort of “advanced decorating.” The safest move would be to pick a lane and stay there.

Regarding postmodern, we do see a growing following for Memphis inspired design. I happen to love postmodern accents and think they are especially chic when partnered with traditional French pieces. It is a very sophisticated juxtaposition.

Q: It seems that antique and vintage oak furniture is “out.” Have you seen this trend and if so, why do you think that is? Are there any types of oak antique furniture that are in demand?

A: I grew up in California where for a long time oak furniture was popular. You are right that in its original form, oak is not super happening right now. However, we do see designers using cerused finishes to update these pieces. The finish takes the yellow out and puts an emphasis on the texture of the oak.

Q: I’ve been seeing lots of lacquered furniture and vintage Chinoiserie used by designers for the past six years or so. Do you see this lasting?

A: I do. Lacquered pieces are a surefire way to bring color and sparkle into a space. And chinoiserie is just a chic classic that pairs well with so many styles. I love it mixed with midcentury modern styles especially.

Q: I am trying to sell some of my parents’ Danish contemporary rosewood furniture. Someone from a local mid-century modern store is interested in the dining room chairs, but not the table. Am I going to have trouble selling the table without the matching chairs?

A: I would sell the chairs. The trend is toward mixing tables and chairs types for an eclectic look.

Q: What fashion trends are you seeing translate into the home?

A: Animal prints have been all over the catwalk, sidewalk and are now really a staple in home decorating. You can see animal prints in seating, pillows, rugs (my favorite) and lampshades. Patterned and pleated lampshades are a whole other trend we are digging!

Q: What do you see as the glaring trends on the West Coast vs. the East Coast? Is it boho on the West and industrial on the East, as I suspect?

A: One of my favorite parts of my job is seeing local differences in style and taste.

My experience is that it’s not really a regional difference but actually varies city by city, or even neighborhood by neighborhood! For example in Los Angeles (especially in neighborhoods, like Silver Lake) you can see more of a boho vibe, but I also see lots of Santa Barbara-style Andalusian looks in Pasadena, modern farmhouse in the Palisades, Art Deco glam in parts of Beverly Hills and unabashed, sleek mid-century modern style in the Hollywood Hills.

Texas also intrigues me. Houston homes often feature lots of smashing French antiques while Dallas embraces contemporary art and midcentury modern. More generally though, if pushed I would say the East Coast runs more traditional (and loves a window treatment) while the West Coast leans toward a more casual vibe.

Q: Rattan, bamboo and wicker seem to be popular in interiors now. Is it OK to use it in places other than a porch or sunroom?

A: Yes please! We see wicker, bamboo and rattan appearing indoors regularly and we love the whimsy, lightness and freshness it brings to a space. It’s chic!

Q: I am new to having anything other than a dorm to decorate, so please bear with me. But I see all this talk about trends – what’s in, out, etc. – in home design but I don’t understand how people decorating their own houses are supposed to respond to that. Are people actually expected to redecorate their houses continuously to reflect what’s “in”?

A: Ha! This is a fun question. Like any style-related category, trends come and go but good, classic basics remain (like Levis). Most folks today think of their home as an expression of their personal style – much like their clothes – and want to change things up regularly. My recommendation is to start with seating and table pieces that you love (I’ll call these “commitment pieces”) and look to art, lighting, rugs and occasional tables and chairs for freshness. How often the refreshing happens is up to you. I will admit to being a serial re-decorator (hence, why I started Chairish) but that’s me!

Q: Are bar carts too overdone? If so, what would you have instead?

A: I happen to find bar carts really useful for entertaining. They have gotten a lot of attention lately, but I remain a fan. That said, nothing is prettier for a party than a gorgeously abundant bar laid out atop a buffet or console table. A classic, good look and equally practical.

Q: What’s your favorite item in your home?

A: I have a massive, clear Murano chandelier in my oval dining room that was a wedding gift from my mom and stepdad (they purchased it while traveling in Venice). It’s never going for sale on Chairish!

Q: While I don’t like the idea of a formal dining room, my husband is threatening to put a Ping Pong table in there. Help! What to do?

A: Formal dining rooms are often underused, so I appreciate your question. I am not sure you will want to tell your husband this, but I have seen ping-pong tables that transform into dining tables. (Just sayin’ . . .)

Because most dining rooms are adjacent to the kitchen, modern families often repurpose their dining rooms into family rooms while perhaps including a smaller table for intimate dining. It’s a practical choice that presents a host of fun decorating options!

Q: I’m 25 and just setting up my first apartment. What’s the one thing I should splurge on?

A: Because you likely have a few moves ahead of you, I would recommend you invest in art you love! It’s easy to transport to a new space and your ability to incorporate these pieces in future homes won’t be constrained by floor plans.

[“source=businessinsider”]

New Hyundai Santro interior leaked ahead of launch

Just a few days before its market launch, the new Hyundai Santro has been spied in production guise at Hyundai’s stockyard. While the exterior of the car is still under partial wrap, what we can show you today is the car’s dashboard and other interior bits.

The new Santro’s cabin, just like most current-gen Hyundai models, is well appointed. The dash gets a dual-tone theme and quality levels are a step up than any other car in competition. Higher trims will come with the 7.0-inch touchscreen system that also includes MirrorLink, voice commands, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. To make operation simpler, Hyundai has cleverly provided a rubberised strip consisting of important shortcut keys just below the screen. Large AC vents are placed vertically on each side of the screen. A large hazard warning light button sits right below, along with large buttons for AC and defogger. Below that lie knobs for the AC, placed at a decent height.

The Santro gets a chronograph-style instrument cluster with a large tachometer and a speedometer. It also gets a monochromatic multi-info display that shows readings for fuel and other important details. The speedometer features a chequered-print, grey plaque design. The car gets a steering wheel similar to the one seen on the Grand i10 and Xcent – it includes faux brushed-aluminium trim and controls for audio and telephony. Hyundai has provided a single USB port upfront and just one cupholder between the front seats, but the glove box is large and so are the door pockets.

Under the hood, the car gets a 1.1-litre petrol motor good for 69hp. Two gearbox options – a 5-speed manual and an AMT – are on offer. Bookings for the Santro are currently open. Hyundai will announce prices for the car on October 23, 2018.

[“source=cnbc”]

 

Honor 8X Max Specifications, Design, Colours, Features Tipped by Online Listing Ahead of Launch

Honor 8X Max Specifications, Design, Colours, Features Tipped by Online Listing Ahead of Launch

Honor 8X Max will sport a vertically stacked dual camera setup.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Honor 8X Max is set to launch on September 5
  • The device will sport a waterdrop-shaped notch
  • It is listed to be priced at CNY 9,998

Huawei’s sub-brand Honor is all set to launch the Honor 8Xand the Honor 8X Max at a launch event in China on September 5. The Max variant is expected to be the more premium model, with a larger screen, and better specifications. Now, more information about the Honor 8X Max has been tipped thanks to its premature listing on JD.com, revealing its complete design, features, and specification details as well.

JD.com lists the Honor 8X Max with a dummy price tag CNY 9,998 (roughly Rs. 103,000). This is obviously just a dummy price tag, and the exact price will be unveiled at the event next week. The smartphone is seen sporting a waterdrop-shaped notch, and a slight chin at the bottom housing the Honor branding. At the back, there is a dual camera setup stacked vertically and a rear fingerprint scanner is seen as well. The smartphone is listed in a Magic Night Black colour option, but the product description page on JD.com has a slew of posters revealing that the Honor 8X Max will also be made available in Blue, and Red colour options. There are complete renders of the phone as well, seen from the front and back.

The posters reveal that the smartphone will sport a huge 7.12-inch display with the waterdrop notch. The screen-to-body ratio is listed to be at 90 percent, and it will support Dolby Atmos sound technology. The back is to sport a 3D design that will reflect differently from different angles. The Honor 8X Max will sport 18W quick charging that will enable 40 minutes of calls with a quick 10-minute charge. The listing was spotted by tipster @banggogo on Twitter.

Previous leaks indicate that both the Honor 8X and the Honor 8X Max will be powered by the Snapdragon 660 SoC. A TENAA listing suggests that the Honor 8X will run on Android 8.1 Oreo, sport a 7.12-inch full-HD+ (1080×2244 pixels) TFT panel with an 18.7:9 aspect ratio, pack 4GB of RAM, 64GB of inbuilt storage, and enclose a 4,900mAh battery under the hood.

The dual rear camera module will bear one 16-megapixel primary sensor and a secondary 2-megapixel depth sensor. On the front, the handset will get an 8-megapixel selfie camera. As for dimensions, the Honor 8X will measure 177.57×86.24×8.13mm and weigh 210 grams.

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Honor 8X Max

Honor 8X Max

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
Display7.12-inch
Processor1.8GHz octa-core
Front Camera8-megapixel
Resolution1080x2244 pixels
RAM4GB
OSAndroid 8.1 Oreo
Storage64GB
Rear Camera16-megapixel + 2-megapixel
Battery Capacity4900mAh
Also See
  • Huawei Honor 8 (Pearl White, 32GB) –
    Rs.12,999
  • Huawei Honor 7A (Blue, 32GB, 3GB RAM)
    Rs.10,449

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Insights On Leadership And Neighborhoods From Executive Director Of Providence Revolving Fund

In its fourth decade, the Providence Revolving Fund (PRF) preserves the architectural heritage of one of the nation’s oldest cities through lending, real estate development, advocacy and technical assistance. In preservation parlance, a revolving fund is a program or, in PRF’s case, an entity which works a pool of capital in a visible way to save endangered properties and strengthen neighborhoods—with monies returning to the fund to be used for similar reinvestment. The nonprofit’s potency is substantial for Providence neighborhoods, having made 470 loans to moderate- and lower-income families; purchased and developed 63 buildings; facilitated $33 million in financing and leveraged an additional $250 million.

Restoration work in progress assisted by the Providence Revolving Fund.COURTESY OF PROVIDENCE REVOLVING FUND

Now a new era dawns for the Providence Revolving Fund, with the hiring of Carrie Zaslow as executive director. The community development professional has a wealth of experience in capital management for housing affordability and revitalization of commercial corridors. She also served as vice chair and chair of the Rhode Island Housing Resources Commission.

Restored and assisted by the Providence Revolving FundCOURTESY OF PROVIDENCE REVOLVING FUND

Tom Pfister: Some people view challenges with neighborhoods as insurmountable. Others are on the fence. What would you say to persons who are unsure about whether to volunteer for or work at organizations that focus on supporting the delicate balances of healthy, inclusive, livable neighborhoods?

Carrie Zaslow: I have a fundamental belief that everyone should be able to live in neighborhoods that are safe, that have performing schools, that have recreation and fresh food available, where residents can thrive, and that honors the history and culture of the neighborhood. With that belief, there needs to be a balance on a policy level that will prevent displacement of current residents even if the neighborhood becomes attractive to others. With that said, I would tell people that community development is hard work, often decades in the making, but it is also immensely satisfying—especially when you speak with the neighborhood residents, and you meet the family that finally has an apartment up to code, lead safe and at a rent they can afford, and they can finally take a deep breath.

MORE FROM FORBES

Pfister: What are the most common misconceptions about affordable housing?

Executive Director Carrie Zaslow of the Providence Revolving FundPHOTO BY IAN TRAVIS BARNARD / COURTESY OF PROVIDENCE REVOLVING FUND

Zaslow: The biggest misconceptions about affordable housing are that it’s housing for people with no jobs and no income, that it will decrease the value of homes nearby and be a burden to the community. This couldn’t be further from the truth. Over 51% of Rhode Island renters are cost-burdenedby housing costs—they are paying more than 30% of their income on housing. A teacher or emergency medical technician supporting a family can longer afford to buy a market-rate house anywhere in Rhode Island. The Providence Revolving Fund has made a priority of both creating and supporting affordable housing that protects Rhode Island’s historic housing stock, and creating affordable housing that is visually beautiful. Today’s affordable housing is well designed, energy efficient and healthy. Families living in healthy and stable conditions are able to increase their family wealth and see their children perform better in school.

Pfister: What lesson have you learned about genuine leadership that guides you?

Zaslow: It’s important to take calculated risks. To understand that true innovation means accepting the possibility of failing. That you can’t let missteps define you—you learn from them and move on. To be a great leader, you are able to extend this mindset to your entire team, so as to create an atmosphere that promotes creativity and innovation.

Pfister: When you worked in other capacities within Providence neighborhoods and organizations, what did you admire from afar, so to speak, about the Providence Revolving Fund?

Zaslow: I always saw the Providence Revolving Fund as a strong organization with a talented staff. I knew founding Executive Director Clark Schoettle and Associate Director Kim Smith, and I admired their work and commitment. The organization is unique as a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) that works with both homeowner-borrowers and real estate developers in the area of historic preservation, and then as a developer itself of affordable housing in historic districts. What stood out for me about PRF was its shared belief in the power of the culture of a neighborhood and the importance of preserving it.

Pfister: Here at the starting line of your tenure as executive director, what is the highest priority facing the Providence Revolving Fund?

Zaslow: Our highest priority is equipping ourselves to meet the evolving needs of Providence neighborhoods and that means growth. The Providence Revolving Fund is one of only four CDFIs working in Rhode Island, and the only one working on historic preservation. Demand for the work we do is high and we will be developing new ways to meet that need.

For more than 25 years, I’ve served as a practitioner in real estate: e.g., I’ve directed a revolving fund for historic properties; raised and underwrote capital for resident-led development in underserved neighborhoods.

[“Source-forbes”]