EU copyright reforms pit creative industry against internet activists, consumers

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Europe’s creative industries are urging EU lawmakers to back a proposed overhaul of the bloc’s copyright rules, putting them at odds with internet activists who oppose a requirement to install filters to block copyright material.

 Image result for EU copyright reforms pit creative industry against internet activists, consumers
People protest against the planned EU copyright reform in Berlin, Germany March 23, 2019. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke

The European Commission wants to reform copyright rules to protect Europe’s cultural heritage and ensure fair compensation to publishers, broadcasters and artistes. The European Parliament is due to vote on the Commission’s proposal on Tuesday.

More than a thousand artists have signed an online petition calling on EU lawmakers to endorse the overhaul while others have ran op-eds in newspapers in support of the changes, lobbying group Impala said in a statement.

Artists in favour of the proposed changes include film producers Pedro Almodovar and Michel Hazanavicius, Benny Andersson from Abba and author Ali Smith, as well as independent music labels.

A vote in favour by the European Parliament would pave the way for the reforms to become law.

Google, internet activists and European technology start-ups, however, oppose the overhaul and were joined on Monday by consumer lobbying body BEUC.

A requirement for Google’s YouTube, Facebook’s Instagram and other sharing platforms to install filters to catch copyright violations known as Article 13, but now renumbered to Article 17, has triggered protests, with an online petition www.savetheinternet.info garnering more than 5 million signatures so far.

Google senior vice-president for global affairs Kent Walker has said the article could prompt online platforms to over-block content to limit legal risks.

Critics also say filters are costly and could lead to erroneous blocking.

Publishers, artistes and actors had also originally been vocal critics of the Commission’s proposal to rewrite the copyright rules but reversed their position after successfully lobbying for Google to pay them for using their work online.

BEUC said it opposed the copyright reforms, arguing that consumers may not be able to share pictures and holiday videos with background music if automated filtering becomes the norm.

“This is not the modernised copyright law that creators and consumers need, but rather another attempt to protect an industry that has consistently resisted to deal with the impact of technological change on their business model,” BEUC’s Director General Monique Goyens said in a statement.

The European Parliament’s approval is the final step in a process which the European Commission kicked off two years ago.

[“source=reuters”]

Millennials are killing canned tuna, but the industry is fighting back

Bumble Bee Chunk Light Tuna in Oil

Geri Lavrov | Getty Images
Bumble Bee Chunk Light Tuna in Oil

Another one bites the dust. This time, millennials are killing canned tuna, according to a Wall Street Journal report.

Consumption of canned tuna has dropped 42 percent per capita from the last 30 years through 2016, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture data. And the industry places the blame on younger consumers, who want fresher or more convenient options.

“A lot of millennials don’t even own can openers,” Andy Mecs, the vice president of marketing and innovation for Starkist, said to the Journal.

The struggle of the three largest canned tuna companies, StarKist, Bumble Bee Foods and Chicken of the Sea International, mirrors that of others in the packaged food industry, like Campbell Soup and Kraft Heinz. Younger consumers are turning away from processed foods, and new competitors are catering to changing tastes faster than the industry’s giants.

To Ken Harris, managing partner at Cadent Consulting Group, the bigger picture is about convenience.

“In the last 15 years, can openers became passe,” Harris told CNBC.

Harris, who has worked with canned tuna businesses, believes that the traditional companies have fallen behind because it’s a low-margin business and investing in packaging falls low on the list of priorities. The main priority for canned tuna companies now, according to Harris, should be packaging that makes it easy to remove and drain the tuna.

StarKist started re-thinking its product line-up in earnest about three to five years ago when the decline of tuna accelerated, Mecs said in an interview with CNBC. He remembered reading a newspaper article a few years ago about millennials recoiling from cereal because the bowl had to be cleaned. For him, the story reiterated how much consumers care about convenience.

Upstarts like Wild Planet Foods and Safe Catch market their tuna as safer and higher quality and are slowly eating into the big three’s market share, the Journal said. According to Nielsen data as of October, smaller brands (not including private labels) control 6.3 percent of the market, up from 3.7 percent in 2014, the Journal said.

To stage a comeback, the traditional tuna makers are taking a page from those brands. Bumble Bee and StarKist both have premium brands that they market as sustainable.

They’re also focusing on the products that are working. Tuna pouches don’t require a can opener, and StarKist told CNBC that sales of its pouches are increasing by 20 percent annually. For the first time, the Pittsburgh-based company sold more pouches than their most popular can size in 2018.

Kroger’s Home Chef, a meal-kit company, has partnered with the tuna brand to put its yellowfin tuna pouches in kits next year.

Bumble Bee and StarKist have also turned to flavors favored by millennials, like sriracha.

Chicken of the Sea is pitching it to younger consumers as a snack. The San Diego-based company started selling resealable cups of its flavored tuna this summer.

Bumble Bee and Chicken of the Sea weren’t immediately available for comment when CNBC reached out.

[“source=cnbc”]

NASA Seeks Partnership With US Industry to Build First Element of ‘Gateway’ Orbital Outpost

NASA Seeks Partnership With US Industry to Build First Element of 'Gateway' Orbital Outpost

In line with US President Donald Trump’s “Space Policy Directive 1”, NASA has sought partnership with the US industry to develop the first element of the Gateway, which will become the orbital outpost for robotic and human exploration operations in deep space.

NASA has released a draft solicitation seeking commercial and international partners via the Board Agency Announcement (BAA) this week to US industry to acquire an element for the Gateway.

The Gateway will support exploration on and near the Moon, and beyond, including Mars, NASA said in a statement.

The draft seeks a high-power, 50-kW solar electric propulsion (SEP) spacecraft to maintain the Gateway’s position as well as move it between lunar orbits as needed.

It will also provide power to the rest of the Gateway, controls and communications, the statement said.

“We believe partnering with US industry for the power and propulsion element will stimulate advancements in commercial use of solar electric propulsion and also serve NASA exploration objectives,” said Michele Gates, Director (Power and Propulsion Element) at NASA.

Through the upcoming solicitation, industry will be asked to participate in a public/private partnership, which includes a flight demonstration of the power and propulsion spacecraft.

Following this test lasting up to one-year in space after launch, NASA will have the option to acquire the spacecraft for use as the first element of the Gateway in lunar orbit.

The power and propulsion element is also expected to enable high-rate, reliable communications between Earth and deep space, which will be important during spacewalks in deep space, human exploration of the lunar surface and more.

To meet current Gateway development planning, NASA is targeting launch of the power and propulsion element on a partner-provided commercial rocket in 2022, the statement said.

In addition to the draft BAA, NASA will host an Industry Day on July 10 prior to issuing the final BAA.

 

 

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Research Industry Leaders Eileen Campbell, Andrew Reid and Jennifer Reid Launch Reid Campbell Group and Announce First Two Holdings — Rival Technologies and Reach3 Insights

Image result for Research Industry Leaders Eileen Campbell, Andrew Reid and Jennifer Reid Launch Reid Campbell Group and Announce First Two Holdings -- Rival Technologies and Reach3 Insights

CHICAGO, June 19, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Eileen Campbell (former Global CEO of Millward Brown) and siblings Jennifer and Andrew Reid (Founder of Vision Critical) have partnered to create Reid Campbell Group, a new holding company that serves as a launch pad for innovation in consumer insights. The newly formed group also announces the launch of their first two companies; insight technology innovator, Rival Technologies and full-service research agency, Reach3 Insights. Reid Campbell Group, Rival Technologies and Reach3 Insights are poised to lead the next wave of market research innovation for the world’s top brands.

Using conversational, mobile-first techniques that consumers use in their everyday lives, Reid Campbell Group companies are particularly focused on integrating the opinions of young and multicultural consumers whose voices often go unheard in traditional market research.

“Research and insights are so fundamental to business success, yet the function is often saddled with a stodgy reputation because we’ve been a bit slow to evolve,” states Founding Partner & Executive Chair of Reid Campbell Group Eileen Campbell. “We need to reflect the rapidly changing communication methods consumers use today to deliver meaningful business results. We are determined to do just that.”

Reid Campbell Group’s first two companies set the tone for the changes to come. Rival Technologies, led by the Founder of Vision Critical and VC Labs, Andrew Reid, is North America’s first company to use conversational chat to gather valuable insights from our ‘Mobile First’ generation. Over time, this technology offers a more personal and consistent way to connect with customers than traditional “ask and answer” questionnaires.

“The more we can mirror human conversations in our contact with customers, the more likely it is that they will provide deep and honest insights,” comments Founding Partner of Reid Campbell Group & CEO of Rival Technologies Andrew Reid.

Reach3 Insights is led by one of North America’s top consumer market researchers, former Ipsos and Vision Critical executive Matt Kleinschmit. Kleinschmit is known for designing and implementing strategic insight platforms for some of the world’s most formidable brands. Accelerated by Rival’s modern technology, Reach3 works on behalf of brands to capture ongoing insights using conversational and other immersive experiences, intelligent analytics and game-changing, storytelling deliverables.

“At the dawn of the millennium, marketing research moved online. In the 2000’s it evolved into online communities & interactive tools. We believe that we are now entering the 3rd wave of modern marketing research, characterized by agile, organic and immersive conversational insights captured at scale through the mediums used by the digital generation,” explains Reach3 Insights Founder & CEO Matt Kleinschmit.

Both Rival Technologies and Reach3 Insights launch with an impressive list of early adopter customers, including Warner Brothers and the NFL. Rival Technologies will continue to enhance their technology and platform to meet expanding client needs, with a full slate of additional enhancements in development. Reach3 Insights will continue to scale to meet the needs of global clients who are seeking more immersive and engaging insights solutions to drive business success.

About Reid Campbell Group
A unique holding company driven to reinvent the staid consumer insights industry, Reid Campbell Group represents the partnership of global insights icons Eileen Campbell (former Global CEO of Millward Brown) and siblings Jennifer and Andrew Reid (Founder and Former President of Vision Critical). The cornerstones of Reid Campbell Group are two companies; Rival Technologies and Reach3 Insights.

Andrew Reid serves as the CEO of Rival Technologies, rethinking research with voice, video, and chat solutions optimized for the ‘Mobile First’ generation. Reach3 Insights, led by one of North America’s top consumer market researchers and former Ipsos and Vision Critical executive, Matt Kleinschmit, is an insights-based consulting agency that leverages Rival’s proprietary technology and designs intelligent research methods to deliver insights at the scale and pace of 21st-century brands. For more information visit: www.reidcampbellgroup.com, www.rivaltech.com or www.reach3insights.com

[“Source-globenewswire”]