5 Ways To Make Money Online In India

Internet access and a digital device can open a world of opportunities for you. It is also possible to make money online that does not require you to have a specific qualification requirement or experience.

However, make sure you verify the authenticity of the website before you enter any kind of agreement. Also, while these may seem like easy ways to earn the extra buck, it requires consitency and dedication, like any other job, for it to give any significant results.

PTC websites

PTC websites

Paid-to-click (PTC) is an online business model where one can make money by clicking on and reading advertisements for around 30 seconds and receive payment for doing so.

These PTC websites act as middlemen between the viewers and the advertisers. It charges the advertisers for driving online traffic and with the same revenue pays the clickers for their time.

The payments are made in the form of money or gift cards.

The service may be extended to completing surveys, playing games, etc where you will be required to provide your feedback on a company’s product (like the game) or take a survey being conducted by the company.

Note: There are multiple fraudulent websites that claim to offer these service. Make sure to verify the authenticity.

Google AdSense

  

Google AdSense

Google AdSense is an advertisement service whereby publishers of content get a chance to make money by placing ads on their website. These ads are managed, sorted and administered by Google.

However, making money from AdSense is not as easy as the PTC site. You can either start a website, or a blog (using Google’s blogger) or a YouTube channel (also a Google product) wherein you create content and drive traffic to your work.

The money is driven by the number of people that visit your website or channel. You will be paid for the number of viewers that see the ads or click on it.

To earn a higher income, you need to make content that drives greater traffic to the website, blog or videos.

Online selling

Online selling

If you have the skill of making handicraft or any product that can be shipped to customers, you can open an online store and start selling.

Apart from dedicating a website for your product, you can tie up with large online retailers like Amazon, Flipkart, Zomato or Swiggy to help connect you with potential buyers and help you with making the delivery.

If you can make products like a mugs, rugs, designer wear, etc, you can sell these on Amazon or Flipkart. You need not make these products, you could even be a dealer who buys from producers.

Online selling is also big for chefs and cooks that lack an infrastructure for a restaurant or would like to drive higher sales than usual. Food delivery apps like Zomato and Swiggy enable order pick up and drop for food-makers.

Services by these brands are highly reliable and help you save on dedicating time and money towards marketing and delivery. You will, however, have to invest in packaging expenses as expected by the online retailer’s standards.

4. Freelancing

  

4. Freelancing

There are online website services that connect users with clients looking for freelancing jobs. These are popular among writers, graphic designers and software developers who have the freedom to work for Indian as well as international clients and sometimes earn in dollars.

If you do not wish to engage with a middleman, some content websites also connect directly with writers, graphic designers and software developers to create work that is paid on project basis.

These jobs not only allow the freelancers to work within the comfort of their home but gives them the opportunity to work as and when they can. It is also ideal for those looking to build their work portfolio at the early stages of their career.

5. Online market trading

  

5. Online market trading

There are multiple stock brokerage companies that allow you trade in equities, commodities or any investment instrument of your liking using just an app on your phone. However, stock trading comes with a great amount of unpredictability where you can stand to lose your money.

You will have to keep yourself updated with news in the business and political world and study the complex aspects of financial market on a regular basis.

With an internet connection, you have a plethora of websites and videos to read news and learn how to invest in the stock markets.

[“source=goodreturns”]

Why You Can’t Find Parental Control Apps in the iOS App Store

Illustration for article titled Why You Can't Find Parental Control Apps in the iOS App Store

iOS: If you’re having trouble finding a good parental control app in the iOS App Store, there’s a reason for that: MDM, or Mobile Device management. According to Apple, apps using MDM “incorrectly” pose serious security risk, and so the company is cracking down—but what does this actually mean?

What is Mobile Device Management?

Mobile Device Management (MDM) is a general term for any technology that allows one device to be controlled and/or monitored by another remotely. Parental control apps on iOS often rely on MDM as a means for controlling screen time, applying content filters, and collecting usage reports, because it’s the only way to obtain device permissions for these kinds of activities. Otherwise, your everyday app on the App Store can’t control your device to this great a degree.

This isn’t some newly implemented technology. MDM has been present on iPhone for years now, with Apple overseeing MDM certification for its devices and even controlling all MDM-based actions on iOS apps.

So why is Apple now so worried about apps using this feature in a way it wasn’t intended? The company now claims that apps with MDM can leave your personal data vulnerable and open to exploitation by hackers, hence the purging of parental control apps from the App Store.

On paper, the move makes sense. If an unwilling person is tricked into installing a certificate from a less-than-stellar app, they’ve just given over the keys to their digital kingdom—a privacy breach Apple would very much like to prevent.

“MDM does have legitimate uses. Businesses will sometimes install MDM on enterprise devices to keep better control over proprietary data and hardware. But it is incredibly risky—and a clear violation of App Store policies—for a private, consumer-focused app business to install MDM control over a customer’s device. Beyond the control that the app itself can exert over the user’s device, research has shown that MDM profiles could be used by hackers to gain access for malicious purposes,” reads a statement Apple published last last month.

Developers (try to) fight back

Several developers with parental control apps now affected by the new MDM policy have responded to Apple’s claims, and their arguments highlight some inconsistencies with Apple’s reasoning.

One app, OurPact, uses MDM to allow parents to set screen time limits on their child’s devices. OurPact’s developers released a statement using Apple’s own MDM documentation to refute the alleged security risks. You can read the full statement here, but the gist of the argument is that since Apple controls the entire MDM review process for iOS apps, properly vetted apps should not pose any of the risks Apple is warning against. As well, OurPact has been open about what it does and how it does it:

“OurPact’s core functionality would not be possible without the use of MDM; it is the only API available for the Apple platform that enables the remote management of applications and functions on children’s devices. We have also been transparent about our use of this technology since the outset, and have documented its use in our submissions to the App Store,” the company’s statement reads.

Photo: OurPact

Some have suggested Apple’s actual reason for removing these MDM-enabled parental control apps is to curb potential competition with iOS 12’s screen time feature. However, other reports point out that many of the apps were purged for various other violations unrelated to MDM, like the prohibition on creating “an App that appears confusing similar to an existing Apple Product, interface, app, or advertising theme.”

If you ask us, the whole this is a net loss for Apple’s customers, even though it is the security-minded approach to take.

What Apple’s purge means for you

Policy disputes between Apple and app developers are one thing, but the biggest concern for iOS users—especially for parents—is that parental controls/screen time apps are being removed from App Store.

This would be less of an issue if Apple provided developers with its own API for controlling screen time, but it does not. More importantly, many of the removed apps like OurPact, Kidslox, and Qustodio included features that iOS parental controls do not—such as filtering web content on non-Safari browsers and cross-compatibility with Android. Their absence leaves parents with fewer options for monitoring their child’s screen time (though there’s debate over just how effective screen time limits can be).

Hopefully, the outcry from developers and the feedback from users will force Apple to at least open up a discussion about the future of parental control on the App Store. For now, however, you might as well settle for using the parental control features built into iOS 12. They’re not as robust when compared to the rival apps, but it’s probably your safest bet for locking down your kids’ activities right now. It might soon be your only one.

[“source=lifehacker”]

Samsung to launch 128GB storage variant of Galaxy M40 in India; check out specifications, price in India

Samsung to launch 128GB storage variant of Galaxy M40 in India; check out specifications, price in India

Samsung launched the new M-series smartphones to target the budget conscious markets like India. The South Korean electronics major has already launched Galaxy M10, Galaxy M20 and Galaxy M30 in India. The fourth smartphone in the M-series will be an affordable and mid-price range device. Samsung also has the budget friendly Galaxy A-series in its armour which has phones like Galaxy A10, Galaxy A20, Galaxy A30 and more.

The Galaxy M40 was first spotted on WiFi Alliance Website with a codename SM-M405F/DS and now, leakster Ishan Agarwal has confirmed on Twitter that Samsung will definitely launch Galaxy M40 in India. In a Tweet, Ishan said, “Samsung is planning to launch the Galaxy M40 soon. It will definitely be launched in India. It seems like it will have at least three colour options: Blue, Blue and Coral (Orange). 128GB Storage in one of the variants. (img of A50). #GalaxyM40 #Samsung”.

The phone that reportedly bears the codename SM-M405F/DS will run on Android 9.0 Pie based on company’s latest One UI. There are also reports that the phone will come with 5,000 mAh battery and be available in Black, Blue and Coral (Orange) colour options.

As per the Wi-Fi certification, the Galaxy M40 will support dual-band Wi-Fi a/b/g/n (2.4GHz, 5GHz) and LTE capabilities. It will also have all five key Wi-Fi certificates a/b/g/n/ac.

The predecessor of the Galaxy M40, the Galaxy M30 came with a 6.4-inch full-HD+ Super AMOLED display panel. The Galaxy M40 is expected to sport a Super AMOLED display too. M40 would most probably provide an incremental update for Galaxy M30.

As far as the camera is concerned, the Galaxy M40 is likely to carry a triple rear camera setup – similar to the Galaxy M30. Galaxy M30 has a 13-MP primary sensor along with an f/1.9 lens, a 5-MP secondary sensor comprising an f/2.2 lens, and a 5-MP tertiary sensor with the same f/2.2 lens. For selfies, the Galaxy M30 has a 16-MP camera along with f/2.0 lens.

Samsung Galaxy M30 is powered by the Exynos 7904 octa-core processor clocked at 1.8 GHz. The phone comes in two variants: one with 4GB RAM, coupled with 64GB of internal storage, and another with 6GB RAM with 128GB of onboard storage.

[“source=businesstoday”]

Future of Creative India lies in its past

Reviving Indian cultural goods and making them commercially viable will boost jobs and entrepreneurship

India has thrived on its creative economy since time immemorial, only to lose it all, in a space of the last 150 years. If we take an example of just the textile industry, we had a share of about 30 per cent in the global trade until late 19th century. This is now down to less than 5 per cent. The place of pride we once held is now just visible in museums, whether it is the 3,500 years old terracotta handspine at Lothal in Gujarat or the legendary transparency of the Indian muslin housed at London’s V&A museum.

The question facing us as Indians today is will we continue to play the cost game with generic products? Will we remain a factory to the world? Or can we hope to make a significant difference in the lives of our citizens, especially the most creative at the bottom of the pyramid. If that hope is real, we would need to restore and leverage our unique creative advantages and build value added business propositions.

In order to do that, we need to look into and learn from our past, trace back the journey and take the faster, more sustainable route to the future. Let us take examples of two plants that Indian textile trade rested on, Cotton and Indigo.

The cotton example

At the time of independence, 98 per cent of the cotton grown in India was the desi variety. Today, it is less than 2 per cent. As the industrial spinning mills in India emerged to help meet the needs of a large population, they needed more production-friendly cotton with longer staple lengths that desi varieties could not provide.

However, this transition happened without paying attention to our unique local semi-industrial ecosystem and we lost our ability to produce yarns and fabrics that nobody else in the world could or can. Up until the late 19th century, we were producing very fine hand spun and hand woven fabrics from the same short staple desicotton varieties. But instead of simultaneously developing technology to support desi cotton, our industry and research institutes (even post-independence) chose to abandon that direction to focus entirely on hybrid and BT cotton.

The indigo story

The second example is of the Indigo dye. Such was our claim to its provenance, that even the term ‘Indigo’ itself is derived from its Indian roots that meant “Indian” or “Indian Ink”. No surprise then that we had near monopoly in the world. We, however, lost our place to the German chemical version, which was much cheaper and the natural medicinal properties of Indigo that permitted miners to live in their jeans for days, was lost to the world.

While these are references from the past, clues on how we could turn these two crops back into a strong and scalable competitive advantage, also reside in our economic history. History has a habit of repeating itself. But only the bad things repeat themselves on their own. Good things, if relevant to current times, need to be cajoled back.

It is in our interest to think of ways how we can revive and accelerate the creative economy, more for commercial reasons than patriotic ones. A strong creative economy will not only provide a strong sense of identity to the future generations, but also generate employment at the grassroots level. But such a revival requires young entrepreneurs to come forward and reclaim the lost traditions and re-establish some of these missing links. There are multiple ways this can be achieved.

For example, we need to invest in finding innovative ways to mechanise post-harvest processes to enable spinning of the very short staple desi cotton. Once the link between the farmer growing desi cotton and the handloom weaver is re-established, the economic value chain will be active again. The small and marginal farmers have natural proclivity towards desi cotton due to their hardiness and low cost.

An assured market would be the only incentive they would need. Such incentives will lead to production of desi cotton on large scale, resulting in yarns that are uniquely Indian and can only be woven on the gentleness of a handloom. This would also render redundant, the questions around the relevance of handlooms in current times.

Likewise, natural indigo is like wine. Production of indigo relies on the characteristics of the soil, micro-climate in the region, skills of the farmer to extract dye, the local water quality and the dyeing techniques. No two lots dye the same, no two regions or tracts of land produce same quality, depth or shades of the colour. Just how wines from different regions have different “tastes”. So while dyers using synthetic indigo will produce a standard product, natural indigo users could produce fine wine like Chateau Margaux!

A combination of fabric made from desi cotton and dyed with natural indigo can recreate the magic of Indianness that is lost in time. Imagine a beautifully textured canvas in the hands of skillful and creative indigo artists. Where else in the world could this happen?

It is time that the current generation of creative entrepreneurs, many with the finest of design education in the world, exposure to global markets and a strong desire to work with Indian artisanal heritage find their own expressions with these two magic crops, to drive not just ‘Make in India’ but also ‘Create in India’.

Some brands like ‘Pero’, ‘11.11’ and ‘Maku’ have made exciting beginnings. Likes of Probiotics in Auroville, who have even created a unique anti-septic, anti-oxidant bath bar from the indigo plant provide an inspiration for many others to follow in their steps. We also have numerous organisations spearheading efforts in support. Malkha, Selco Foundation, Asal and Khamir are coming forward to finding real solutions to building the broken desi cotton value chain.

A beginning has been made, but there are miles to go. This requires a collective effort not only from the ecosystem partners and government, but also from customers. A first step could be recognising the beauty and relevance of Indian cultural goods in contemporary times. Ask not just what the world has to bring to us but what we have to bring to the world.

Anchal is an advisor, teacher and mentor specialising in creative and cultural industries, and an alumnus of IIM Ahmedabad. Amit Karna is Associate Professor of Strategy and Innovation at IIM Ahmedabad. They together offer the creative and cultural businesses programme for entrepreneurs and industry at IIM-A.

[“source=thehindubusinessline”]