Florida Georgia Line Expands Empire With New Creative Compound In Nashville

Tyler Hubbard and Brian Kelley of award-winning country duo Florida Georgia Line expanded their ever-growing empire once again with the opening of a brand new creative compound in Nashville.

The property is home to three businesses: meet + greet, Tree Vibez Music and Tribe Kelley Trading Post. Each company offers something different to Nashville’s budding business and entertainment industries.

With 2,471-square-foot of work and meeting space, meet + greet features five rooms, two private balconies, an organic espresso bar and a picturesque outdoor space. Rooms are available to rent for guests and members.

Tree Vibez Music is a publishing company founded by Hubbard and Kelley in 2015. The home office boasts a recording studio and writing rooms for the company’s entire roster, which features artists and songwriters such as RaeLynn and Canaan Smith.

Lastly, the Tribe Kelley Trading Post is a unique storefront featuring clothing and accessories from the Tribe Kelley brand, which was founded by Kelley and his wife Brittney.

Finding a gorgeous, tree-lined property in the middle of Nashville wasn’t an easy feat, but once Kelley stumbled upon this particular piece of land, the men knew they had to have it.

“We were able to get our hands on it and we kind of had a vision and a dream to keep the original houses that were here, but add on to it,” Hubbard explains. “We wanted to kind of restore them and make them places that we could come to and be creative and create something for our friends and our writers to come to.”

The end result “brings together music, fashion, business … even coffee,” and it’s something the duo is “really, really proud of.”

Giving back to the Nashville music community is one of Florida Georgia Line’s biggest passions. This new compound will allow them to do just that.

“That’s what it’s all about, being a little light to the younger artists,” Kelley shares. “We had that as we came up, from Jake Owen to Taylor Swift, the list goes on and on. We’ve been very fortunate and very blessed to kind of be like sponges and soak up as much knowledge and experience as we can and to be able to pass that on is really rewarding.”

New artists have a lot to learn from the duo’s success. Since the release of their debut single, “Cruise,” in 2012, Florida Georgia has catapulted into superstardom. They have sold out stadiums, earned 16 chart-topping singles and they currently hold the title for the longest-running No.1 (48 weeks and counting) on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart with “Meant to Be” with Bebe Rexha.

The opening of the creative compound follows the duo’s other successful business ventures, which include the launch of Old Camp Whiskey and the opening of FGL House, their 22,000-square-foot restaurant in Nashville.

The guys admit the empire they’ve built is pretty surreal, but want fans to know they don’t take a second of it for granted.

“We had a pretty big dream and God just kind of took that dream and multiplied it bigger than we could have ever even imagined,” Hubbard says with a smile.

In the midst of their busy careers as singers, songwriters and entrepreneurs, they do make a point to step back and soak it all in every now and then.

“It’s been amazing what one dream can lead to, and what great music and great songs can lead to, and the opportunity now that we get to create of other people… it’s so fulfilling,” Hubbard adds.

Florida Georgia Line is currently putting the finishing touches on their much-anticipated new studio album. While they couldn’t reveal exactly when fans can get their hands on the new record, Kelley told me it would arrive at the “top of next year.”

“We just love getting new music out,” he says. “We’re chomping at the bit for sure.”

[“source=forbes]

 

The cofounder of Chairish talks about what’s hot in vintage decor

Anna Brockway, cofounder of online marketplace Chairish and a former vice president at Levi Strauss, is known for her taste-making style and loves flea markets, Delft blue and white planters and Vladimir Kagan mohair sofas. She knows a lot about what vintage and antique pieces are in demand by what people are buying and selling on her site.

Brockway joined staff writer Jura Koncius last week on The Washington Post’s Home Front online chat. Here is an edited excerpt.

Q: What’s trending in art? Is the gallery wall over?

A: Right now, we are seeing lots of interest in Pop art. (Think large-scale, bright colors and ironic takes on commercial themes.)

As for your second question: Long live the gallery wall! We have seen piqued interest in a new take on it, though – more like a tile look where pieces by the same artist in a similar theme, shape and frame are used in large grid configurations. It’s a more sophisticated, and maybe a little calmer, take on the gallery wall approach.

Q: We live in a mid-century home and own almost exclusively pre-1970 furniture/decor. Our family room sofa has seen better days, and we’d like to replace it with a washable slip cover with a mid-century modern look. Do you have any suggestions?

A: I would recommend a simple Lawson (or square) arm sofa with a tailored slipcover. Look for a low profile to match the rest of your design.

Q: I’ve just started antique hunting for my home. What are some vintage home decor items I should look out for?

A: I would recommend starting with vintage rugs, lighting (like table lamps) and occasional pieces (ottomans and small side tables). These will add personal style to your space as you start to develop your own vintage aesthetic and usually aren’t big financial and space commitments.

Q: I love the sturdiness and quality of older furniture. How do I make these pieces more transitional? I see ” just slap some white paint on it” all over Pinterest, but there must be another way to respect the piece and give it a new home.

A: Making traditional brown furniture relevant is all about context. Two tips: I like it when a traditional piece is used in a highly edited room with lots of negative space around the piece. In other words, get rid of the clutter! This allows the beauty, solidity and character of the traditional piece to really be appreciated.

Secondly, surround the piece with a light color. The main thing that you want to avoid is the heavy, all-dark look, and that can be accomplished through the thoughtful use of color.

Q: What’s the trend in vintage metals? Is brass still hot? Is vintage moving to a postmodern phase? Are the 1990s back? What’s your favorite mix of periods, textures and colors?

A: For metals, we’ve seen a sustained interest in brass. But I will say that I love it when folks fearlessly mix metal types for a more eclectic look! It’s tricky, though, and sort of “advanced decorating.” The safest move would be to pick a lane and stay there.

Regarding postmodern, we do see a growing following for Memphis inspired design. I happen to love postmodern accents and think they are especially chic when partnered with traditional French pieces. It is a very sophisticated juxtaposition.

Q: It seems that antique and vintage oak furniture is “out.” Have you seen this trend and if so, why do you think that is? Are there any types of oak antique furniture that are in demand?

A: I grew up in California where for a long time oak furniture was popular. You are right that in its original form, oak is not super happening right now. However, we do see designers using cerused finishes to update these pieces. The finish takes the yellow out and puts an emphasis on the texture of the oak.

Q: I’ve been seeing lots of lacquered furniture and vintage Chinoiserie used by designers for the past six years or so. Do you see this lasting?

A: I do. Lacquered pieces are a surefire way to bring color and sparkle into a space. And chinoiserie is just a chic classic that pairs well with so many styles. I love it mixed with midcentury modern styles especially.

Q: I am trying to sell some of my parents’ Danish contemporary rosewood furniture. Someone from a local mid-century modern store is interested in the dining room chairs, but not the table. Am I going to have trouble selling the table without the matching chairs?

A: I would sell the chairs. The trend is toward mixing tables and chairs types for an eclectic look.

Q: What fashion trends are you seeing translate into the home?

A: Animal prints have been all over the catwalk, sidewalk and are now really a staple in home decorating. You can see animal prints in seating, pillows, rugs (my favorite) and lampshades. Patterned and pleated lampshades are a whole other trend we are digging!

Q: What do you see as the glaring trends on the West Coast vs. the East Coast? Is it boho on the West and industrial on the East, as I suspect?

A: One of my favorite parts of my job is seeing local differences in style and taste.

My experience is that it’s not really a regional difference but actually varies city by city, or even neighborhood by neighborhood! For example in Los Angeles (especially in neighborhoods, like Silver Lake) you can see more of a boho vibe, but I also see lots of Santa Barbara-style Andalusian looks in Pasadena, modern farmhouse in the Palisades, Art Deco glam in parts of Beverly Hills and unabashed, sleek mid-century modern style in the Hollywood Hills.

Texas also intrigues me. Houston homes often feature lots of smashing French antiques while Dallas embraces contemporary art and midcentury modern. More generally though, if pushed I would say the East Coast runs more traditional (and loves a window treatment) while the West Coast leans toward a more casual vibe.

Q: Rattan, bamboo and wicker seem to be popular in interiors now. Is it OK to use it in places other than a porch or sunroom?

A: Yes please! We see wicker, bamboo and rattan appearing indoors regularly and we love the whimsy, lightness and freshness it brings to a space. It’s chic!

Q: I am new to having anything other than a dorm to decorate, so please bear with me. But I see all this talk about trends – what’s in, out, etc. – in home design but I don’t understand how people decorating their own houses are supposed to respond to that. Are people actually expected to redecorate their houses continuously to reflect what’s “in”?

A: Ha! This is a fun question. Like any style-related category, trends come and go but good, classic basics remain (like Levis). Most folks today think of their home as an expression of their personal style – much like their clothes – and want to change things up regularly. My recommendation is to start with seating and table pieces that you love (I’ll call these “commitment pieces”) and look to art, lighting, rugs and occasional tables and chairs for freshness. How often the refreshing happens is up to you. I will admit to being a serial re-decorator (hence, why I started Chairish) but that’s me!

Q: Are bar carts too overdone? If so, what would you have instead?

A: I happen to find bar carts really useful for entertaining. They have gotten a lot of attention lately, but I remain a fan. That said, nothing is prettier for a party than a gorgeously abundant bar laid out atop a buffet or console table. A classic, good look and equally practical.

Q: What’s your favorite item in your home?

A: I have a massive, clear Murano chandelier in my oval dining room that was a wedding gift from my mom and stepdad (they purchased it while traveling in Venice). It’s never going for sale on Chairish!

Q: While I don’t like the idea of a formal dining room, my husband is threatening to put a Ping Pong table in there. Help! What to do?

A: Formal dining rooms are often underused, so I appreciate your question. I am not sure you will want to tell your husband this, but I have seen ping-pong tables that transform into dining tables. (Just sayin’ . . .)

Because most dining rooms are adjacent to the kitchen, modern families often repurpose their dining rooms into family rooms while perhaps including a smaller table for intimate dining. It’s a practical choice that presents a host of fun decorating options!

Q: I’m 25 and just setting up my first apartment. What’s the one thing I should splurge on?

A: Because you likely have a few moves ahead of you, I would recommend you invest in art you love! It’s easy to transport to a new space and your ability to incorporate these pieces in future homes won’t be constrained by floor plans.

[“source=businessinsider”]

Dentsu Impact bags creative mandate for Mobiistar in India

Vietnamese smartphone brand Mobiistar, which entered the Indian smartphone market in May this year, has recently awarded its creative duties to Dentsu Impact. Following a multi-agency pitch, Dentsu Impact has bagged the creative mandate for Mobiistar.

Aniruddha Deb & DOUBLE & # title=
Aniruddha Deb

Aniruddha Deb, chief marketing officer, Mobiistar says,”While we entered the country in May, we wanted to highlight our strong commitment towards the country by establishing ourselves more deeply into its ecosystem. Hence to reach out to the discerning smartphone consumers, we have roped in Dentsu Impact as the brand’s creative partner in India. The team at Dentsu Impact will work closely with the Mobiistar team for the offline launch strategy and the communication roll-out pan India. We are excited about the possibilities and are going to be quite aggressive in this extremely busy category.”

Commenting on the win, Amit Wadhwa, president, Dentsu Impact says, “We are excited to partner Mobiistar as this gives us the canvas to build this compelling brand in the Indian market. The category is extremely competitive, and it is not just about getting the right pulse of the market but also about getting the right handle on the mediums today.”

Dentsu Impact is going to be Mobiistar’s creative, communication strategy, advertising and branding partner. The agency will help Mobiistar in understanding the consumer’s mindset, behavior, motivations and triggers that will help the company make a mark in a cluttered smartphone category. The brand has planned multiple campaigns in the coming months and Dentsu Impact’s partnership will be key in rolling out integrated campaigns for new products.

Dentsu Impact is a creative agency of the Dentsu Aegis network that handles Maruti Suzuki, HT, Ikea, Carlsberg and the agency recently set up its Bangalore office as well.

[“source=ndtv”]

Microsoft Expands Azure Cloud Service in Push for $10 Billion Pentagon Contract

Microsoft Expands Azure Cloud Service in Push for $10 Billion Pentagon Contract

Microsoft Corp said on Tuesday its expanded Azurecloud service to help government clients save data on their own servers would be available by the end of the first quarter of 2019, as it battles with Amazon.com for a $10 billion (roughly Rs. 74,200 crores) Pentagon contract.

The two companies are left in the fray for the lucrative contract after Alphabet’s Google dropped out on Monday, saying the company’s new ethical guidelines do not align with the project.

Pentagon’s JEDI, or Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure, cloud computing solution contract is part of the Department of Defense’s efforts to modernise its IT infrastructure.

The expanded Azure Government Secret cloud service will make Microsoft “a strong option for the JEDI contract,” said Julia White, corporate vice president of Microsoft Azure, adding that the company is capable of meeting the highest classification requirement for handling “top secret US classified data”.

[“source=gsmarena”]