View: India needs to improve its educational outcomes to catch up with China

Education

Both China and India started building their national education systems under comparable conditions in the late 1940s. Different policies and historical circumstances have, however, led them to different educational outcomes, with China outperforming India not just in terms of its percentage of literate population and enrollment rates at all levels of education, but also in terms of number of world-class institutions in higher education, and greater research output.

The roots of China’s successful education system date back to the Cultural Revolution(1966-1976), which unintentionally expanded access to the primary education through democratising the schooling system, which was previously elitist in character, thus addressing the problem of mass illiteracy.

In contrast, India continued to focus on its higher education system since independence and only realised the importance of basic education in 1986, keeping it behind China and many other countries in Asia in educational development. In terms of enrollment, China reached a 100 percent gross enrollment rate (GER) in its primary education in 1985, whereas, India attained that level only in 2000.

In terms of secondary school enrollment, India and China both started at the similar rates in 1985, with about 40 percent of their population enrolled in secondary schools. However, due to a wider base of primary school students, the rate of increase in China has been much faster than in India, with 99 percent secondary enrollment rate in China and 79 percent in India in 2017.

India is closing in on the Chinese rate in terms of access to education, but on the literacy level front, there is a huge gap in the percentage of literate populations in the two countries. In the age group of 15-24 years, India scores 104th rank on literacy and numeracy indicator, compared to China’s 40th rank.

The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which assesses after every three years the domain knowledge of 15-year-old students in reading, mathematics, science and finance, revealed that students in China performed above the OECD average in 2015. Moreover, one in four students in China are top performers in mathematics, having an ability to formulate complex situations mathematically. Further, China outperforms all the other participating countries in financial literacy, by having a high ability to analyse complex finance products. For India, the comparable data is not available as it was not a participating country in PISA 2015.

However, in India, the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2017 provides data for rural youth, aged 14-18, with respect to their abilities to lead productive lives as adults. According to this survey, only about half of the 14-year-old children in the sample could read English sentences, and more than half of the students surveyed could not do basic arithmetic operations, like division. For basic financial calculations, such as managing a budget or making a purchase decision, less than two-thirds could do the correct calculations.

With regard to the higher education system, both India and China dominate the number of tertiary degree holders because of their large population size, but when it comes to the percentage of the population holding tertiary degrees, only about 10 per cent and 8 per cent of the population possess university degrees in China and India, respectively. By contrast, in Japan, almost 50 per cent of the population holds a tertiary degree, and in the United States, 31 per cent of the population hold a tertiary degree.

In terms of the international recognition of universities, the Times Higher Education (THE) World University Ranking for 2019 places seven of the China’s universities in the top 200, compared to none for India. The global university rankings, which are based on various performance metrices, pertaining to teaching, research, citations, international outlook and industrial income, shows progress for several of China’s low-ranked universities, largely driven by improvements in its citations.

In fact, the Tsinghua University has overtaken the National University of Singapore (NUS) to become the best university in Asia due to improvements in its citations, institutional income and increased share of international staff, students and co-authored publications.

While India has progressed in terms of massification of education, there is still a lot which needs to be done when it comes to catching up with the China’s educational outcomes. China’s early start in strengthening its primary and secondary education systems has given it an edge over India in terms of higher education. Moreover, Chinese government strategies are designed in line with the criterion used in major world university rankings, especially emphasis is on the two factors which weigh heavily in the rankings — publications and international students.

The relentless publications drive, which is very evident in China, is weak in India and has led to a growing gap in the number of publications contributed by the two countries. Further, China enrolled about 292,611 foreign students in 2011 from 194 countries, while India currently only has 46,144 foreign students enrolled in its higher education institutions, coming from 166 countries. The large number of international enrollments in China is a reflection of its state policies granting high scholarships to foreign students.

To catch up with China, India needs to lay emphasis on improving its educational outcomes. Massification drive for education has helped India raise its student enrollments, but a lot needs to be done when it comes to global recognition for its universities. Further, it needs to focus on building the foundation skills which are acquired by students at the school age, poor fundamental skills flow through the student life, affecting adversely the quality of education system.

[“source=economictimes.indiatimes”]

Secretary DeVos Praises Expansion of Educational Opportunities for Illinois Students and Families

Image result for Secretary DeVos Praises Expansion of Educational Opportunities for Illinois Students and Families

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos today released the following statement:

“Real change and innovation in education will not come from Washington—it will come from states where parents and students demand more education options and have their voices heard. I commend Gov. Rauner and Superintendent Smith for their leadership in making Illinois the 18th state to adopt a tax credit scholarship program. By expanding choices for families and focusing funding on individual students, this program will help thousands of Illinois children succeed.”

source:-ed

Apple Swift Playgrounds Educational Coding App Expands to Robots, Drones, and More

Apple Swift Playgrounds Educational Coding App Expands to Robots, Drones, and More

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Swift Playgrounds to offer new way to learn to code using robots, drones
  • It is an intuitive programming language for building apps
  • The Swift Playgrounds 1.5 update will be available from June 5

Tech giant Apple has announced that Swift Playgrounds, its educational coding app for iPad, will now offer a new way to learn to code using robots, drones and musical instruments.

Swift Playgrounds is great for students and beginners learning to code with Swift, Apple’s intuitive programming language for building apps.

“More than one million kids and adults from around the world are already using Swift Playgrounds to learn the fundamentals of coding with Swift in a fun and interactive way,” said Craig Federighi, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Software Engineering.

“Now they can instantly see the code they create and directly control their favourite robots, drones and instruments through Swift Playgrounds. It’s an incredibly exciting and powerful way to learn,” added Federighi.

Apple is working with leading device makers to make it easy to connect to Bluetooth-enabled robots within the Swift Playgrounds app, allowing kids to programme and control popular devices, including LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3, Sphero SPRK+, Parrot drones and more.

The Swift Playgrounds 1.5 update will be available as a free download on the App Store starting from June 5.

Swift Playgrounds is compatible with all iPad Air and iPad Pro models and iPad mini 2 and later running iOS 10 or even later versions.

[“Source-ndtv”]

Spotlight: Zyrobotics Creates Inclusive Educational Products

zyrobotics educational technology for children

Not all kids learn the same. But Zyrobotics wants to make sure that all kids have the opportunity to learn in their own way. The company uses innovative technology to create educational technology for children that is truly inclusive. Read more about the company and its offerings in this week’s Small Business Spotlight.

What Zyrobotics Does

Provides educational technology for children with differing abilities between the ages 3-12.

Business Niche

Offering an inclusive design.

Founder and CTO, Dr. Ayanna Howard told Small Business Trends, “Our products engage both typical children as well as children with special needs, such as children with autism or cerebral palsy. Our focus is to ensure all children are provided equal access to fun and engaging educational STEM curriculum.”

How Zyrobotics Got Started

As a robot programming camp.

Howard was working as a professor at Georgia Tech when she received a grant to form a camp for kids with special needs.

She explains, “These camps not only led to the development of accessible interfaces for children with physical disabilities, but with support from the Georgia Tech Venturelab startup program and the State of Georgia GRA Ventures program, the company was founded and the lab technology accelerated to commercialization. Zyrobotics mission is to create accessible technologies that engage and empower all children.”

zyrobotics educational technology for children

Biggest Win

Launching a smart toy called the Zumo Learning System.

Howard says, “It was our first e-learning system that created an inclusive learning environment for children of all abilities. The system was designed so that children, with and without special needs, can have fun while engaging with math subjects. The idea for Zumo came while we were working with kids at a therapy clinic. The therapists had to work very hard to motivate the kids to interact with assistive switches needed to operate various communication devices. We discovered that the kids were more likely to use an assistive switch if the switch was fun to play with. Designing Zumo enabled us to not only address the needs of our target demographic, but to do it such that they are using technology that every child wants to interact with.”

Biggest Risk

Building an inclusive approach to education through educational technology for children.

Howard explains, “Initially, we dedicated our resources to the special needs market then decided later to focus on inclusive education to include children with and without special needs. If things went wrong — for instant if our products did not appeal to the mainstream child, we would have a limited market that wasn’t sustainable. That’s one of the reasons why we design our apps to be accessible, but appealing to all children. The payoff has been a reputation as a company that develops products to address the needs of the special needs community, while also allowing inclusion.”

Lesson Learned

Sales strategies are important.

Howard says, “If I were to start again, we would focus more on developing a concrete sales strategy before implementing marketing initiatives.”

How They’d Spend an Extra $100,000

Sales and marketing.

zyrobotics educational technology for children

Interesting Fact

Unique office décor.

Howard says, “We have stuffed turtles all over our office.”

Favorite Quote

“Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.” –Thomas Edison

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Find out more about the Small Biz Spotlight program.

Images: Zyrobotics, Top image: (left to right) Founder and COO John Harding, Principal Engineer Dr. Hae-Won Park, CEO Johnetta MacCalla, Founder and CTO, Dr. Ayanna Howard, Third image: Dr. Ayanna Howard

[“source-smallbiztrends”]