Mullen Lintas to handle Quikr’s creative duties

Mullen Lintas to handle Quikr’s creative duties

Quikr has appointed Mullen LintasBengaluru as its creative agency. Mullen Lintas was selected after a competitive multi-agency pitch that saw participation from some of the leading advertising agencies in India. What began as a pitch process for two verticals quickly went on to the entire Quikr group portfolio and Mullen Lintas has now been mandated to handle all the verticals.

This win marks as another major triumph for Mullen Lintas that has been on an upward growth swing over the past few months. Only recently, the agency had won the creative mandate for Too Yumm!, the new food brand from RP-SG group company Guiltfree Industries, plus the creative mandates for Motlial Oswal, a leading equity funds player in India and Tata Cliq, the ecommerce retail store from the Tata Group.

Commenting on the win, Ameer Jaleel, Chairman and Chief Creative Officer – Mullen Lintas, said, “What’s different about Quikr is their approach to the entire category. It’s not transactional. They have a unique perspective on the consumer and what it means for them. And we found the approach very refreshing and is allowing us to create some interesting pieces of work that will create engaging conversations.”

Commenting on the appointment of the agency, Vineet Sehgal, CMO, Quikr, said, “Today, the needs and preferences of consumers are evolving. As we help them upgrade their lifestyle, we needed a partner who thinks on their feet and keep up with the fast pace that we need. Mullen Lintas team fits in perfectly with our hunger, passion along with their innovative line of thought.”

Adding his views, Virat Tandon, CEO, Mullen Lintas, commented, “We are very excited to welcome Quikr to Mullen Lintas. Quikr is revolutionising the online transactions space across various product categories. We were very impressed with the way they are playing a leadership role in developing this category. We will be able to innovate with the cross category benefits that Quikr brings to its consumers. I am sure the Mullen Lintas team will further add fuel to their marketing initiatives and help take the brand to the next level.”

[“Source-exchange4media”]

World exclusive image: the new TVR supercar

Image result for World exclusive image: the new TVR supercar

Back in 2013, and seemingly out of nowhere, a British consortium led by a gentleman called Les Edgar announced that it had acquired TVR, lock, stock and smoking tyres. We tracked Les down, on the phone at least, and liked what he heard. Last month, the PR wheels began to rotate more quickly, when it was confirmed that the first all-new TVR for 12 years will debut at the Goodwood Revival in September. Before that, TopGear.com is proud to share a world exclusive image of the new car (pic 1). Let us know what you think.

The question is, especially for the younger end of the audience, how much should we care? Answer: a lot. TG and TVR go way back together, and we spent a good portion of the 1990s looking through the side windows of Lord knows how many of these cars. But as the fully automated BEV world draws ever closer, TVR’s commitment to internally combusting old-school high performance has never been more welcome. Factor in that TVR’s new owners have also engaged the services of a company called GMD – Gordon Murray Design – to develop the car, and it’s clear this comeback has serious legs.

Time, then, for a proper face-to-face summit, which was scheduled for the week after Le Mans because Les was there. Le Mans, it turns out, is a key part of the plan: TVR will be racing there much sooner than you might think. Interestingly, it was Les who masterminded Aston’s return to endurance racing in the early Noughties, having secured the license to run the programme, before doing the deal with David Richards at Prodrive. Apparently, a Vanquish-based LMP1 contender was on the drawing board for a while, before financial realities kicked in, and the programme switched instead to the DB9 and Vantage (highly successfully, not least in 2017 when it took a class win).

We’ve done massive amounts of computer modelling on this. We’ve also done accelerated salt water corrosion tests. It won’t rust

The more you find out about Les Edgar, 57, the more reassuring New TVR starts to sound. Edgar’s background is in computer games, which has given him both a buccaneering creative spirit but also a powerful pragmatism. He’s also a committed petrolhead, one with rarefied tastes. He talks animatedly about his Aston Martin N600 Vantage – another Nineties British bruiser – and more wistfully about the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato and Ferrari 250 GT SWB competizione he used to own (he sold the latter to Eric Clapton). Then there’s the way he and his colleagues set about wresting TVR back from its previous owner, the young son of a Russian oligarch.

“We had an in-road into Nikolai Smolensky,” he tells me. “He was disinterested at first. But then he told me a story that led to my bid. He was in Berkeley Square in London when a kid, who was walking with his father, came up to him, kicked him in the shins and shouted, ‘you killed TVR!’ I suggested we could help him repatriate the brand to the UK. It was a bizarrely straightforward transaction after that.”

Top Gear: Give me the elevator pitch on New TVR.

Les Edgar: Six-speed manual, 5.0-litre Cosworth V8, shouty, great looking, top speed 200mph – although we can limit it if you want – 0-60 comfortably sub-4.0 secs, Gordon Murray designed, full ground-effect aero, carbon fibre chassis, full leather trim, unique colours. We’re targeting power-to-weight ratio rather than outright power. Fully loaded, the launch car weighs under 1,250kg and has 400bhp-per-tonne. We’ll have to eke some more out of it… All for £90k. That sounds pretty good to me.

TG: Is your take on TVR that it’s a balls-out sports car? Or a grand tourer?

LE: It’s more towards the Aston spectrum than it is Lotus. Sports GT is where we’re headed. Sports cars should be small. An Aventador is not a sports car. The Griff rides well because it’s on smaller wheels and taller tyres, which is what we’ve gone for. It’s more comfortable. The new car had to be timeless, although that’s a difficult thing to strive for. The Griff had simplicity. We tried to get that with this car, but there had to be some cues that tell you it means business. So there are thumping exhausts at the side, and lots of aero at the rear. We’ve avoided fitting too many electronics; they’re expensive and will be unreliable at some point, although we do have digital instruments and a touchscreen infotainment system. We’ve used ultra-reliable components and then ‘bespoked’ them to TVR’s need.

TG: Doesn’t the Porsche 911 terrify you?

LE: Everyone looks at the 911 and thinks, ‘well, they got everything right’, in all the key parameters. Everything but nothing, in a strange sort of way. Sports cars used to be unique, they used to have foibles. Now it’s difficult to tell them apart. TVR did that brilliantly. We are the under-dog challenging everybody, whether on the road or the race-track. The passion drives us on. It sounds trite, but it’s true. If you haven’t got that, you’ll build a competent car, but you won’t build a TVR. That said, we have built an incredibly sound business case.

TG: So where did you start?

LE: Our job is to broaden the marketplace. We couldn’t sell a car like the Sagaris straight off. People have been softened by the latest cars, whose set-up and software make you feel like a God. Porsche owners have reached a certain level, they know what they’re getting, they won’t get laughed at by their mates when they say they’ve bought a 911. If you’re not an outright sports car fan, you’d be very happy. As you would with an Audi RS6. The reliability thing has been a real focus for us. Not just to conquer the historical problem TVR might have had in that area, although I honestly don’t think they were any worse than many others. It was more a case of too much power, not enough control. You could do that then, now you need to be more pragmatic.

I helped put Aston Martin back at Le Mans, now I want to see them off with this car

TG: The day you did the deal with Gordon Murray must have been a good one.

LE: We couldn’t afford to develop the electronics to make you feel like a God, but we knew Gordon was a God, so we figured he could do it. We’d bought this magnificent brand, and we thought, ‘what do we do now?’ There was no way we could launch a new TVR at £150k, although maybe we’ll get there eventually with something else. We talked to everybody. We talked to Gordon, but knew we couldn’t afford him. Anyway, there were three of us on our side, with GMD’s entire board opposite us. They told us about the city car. Then I said, ‘well, we’re going to Le Mans’. And instantly every single one of them smiled. Emotionally, they’re racers. I thought, this might just work.

TG: How does GMD’s ‘i-Stream’ technology work on the new car?

LE: There’s a steel tubular skeleton, mainly there to locate the engine, suspension and driver. A carbon fibre sandwich with honeycomb centre is bonded in around it. That makes it enormously strong, approaching 20,000 Nm per degree. You attach the crash structures front and back. They’re aluminium, and bolted on. The carbon panels are created at low pressure and low temperature, not done in an autoclave, so they’re cheaper to manufacture. The body consists of composite panels, bolted on at the end of the process. In an impact, the frame takes the impact and directs the forces through the tyres. So it won’t ripple the body. We’ve done massive amounts of computer modelling on this. We’ve also done accelerated salt water corrosion tests. It won’t rust.

TG: And you’re serious about taking TVR back to Le Mans?

LE: One-make race series is definitely happening. For me, for a sports car to show its mettle it has to go racing at Le Mans. I helped put Aston Martin back there, now I want to see them off with this car. The focus right now is on building a great road car. You need a lot of downforce at Le Mans, and Frank Coppuck [Technical Director at GMD] said, well the car needs to be wider, because the wing design is restricted by the width of the car. It also needed more presence and stance. So it’s 100mm longer, the cabin is 420mm wider, and that also gives us more width at the rear. That was a hard-fought battle, and one of the few compromises Gordon made.

TG: Only a madman would start building cars. Ergo you are mad.

LE: Correct. [laughs] There are lots of things you need to have, aside from money – and you can never have enough of that in this business. You certainly need to have some balls. Having a relatively small budget focuses you on the important things. Look, an opportunity like this doesn’t come along very often. In fact, it doesn’t come along at all. To revive a British sports car brand, a genuinely iconic name, British-owned, British-built… as a starting point, that can’t be bad. This isn’t somebody indulging in a mid or late-life crisis. We need to do this. I need to do it. TVR needs to come back and be great again.

[“Source-topgear”]

Best Phones Under Rs. 10,000: Which is the Best Mobile in Under-10000 Segment?

Best Phones Under Rs. 10,000: Which is the Best Mobile in Under-10000 Segment?

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Xiaomi Redmi 4 is a worthy successor to the Redmi 3S Prime
  • The Yu Yureka Black is another good mobile under Rs. 10,000
  • The Lenovo K6 Power remains a solid choice as well

Although the news is often dominated by the latest flagship phones because that’s where the most innovation is happening, when it’s time to actually buy a phone, most of us are still looking in the under Rs. 10,000 category. It’s also one of the categories that sees relatively fast turnover in picks, as a lot of mobiles are released in this price range. In the under Rs. 10,000 category, we’ve added a few phones that weren’t there in our last roundup, and there’s a notable exit as well. If you’re looking to buy a mobile under Rs. 10,000, then these are the absolute best options you have right now.

As always, we’ve stuck to phones that we’ve put through our detailed review process, since we can’t vouch for quality of phones based on just their specifications. We’ve also avoided mobiles that are over a year old, as, especially in the sub-Rs. 10,000 price bracket, things tend to change for the better pretty quickly.

Here are our top picks (in no particular order) that all fight it out to be the best phone under Rs. 10,000, along with a few other phones worth checking out.

Best phones under Rs. 10,000

Mobile under Rs. 10,000 Gadgets 360 rating
Xiaomi Redmi 4 8/10
Yu Yureka Black 8/10
Lenovo K6 Power 8/10
Moto G4 7/10
Coolpad Note 3S 7/10

 

1. Xiaomi Redmi 4
Replacing the Xiaomi Redmi 3S Prime, which was one of the strongest picks through much of last year, we now have the Xiaomi Redmi 4, which is also a good pick if your budget is under Rs. 10,000.

Our review rated the 3GB/ 32GB variant of the phone 8 on 10 which is really good for a phone at this price point, and the new phone has really good battery life and a sleek and compact design. The camera is disappointing, but it’s a problem that even the best phones under the Rs. 10,000 price must live with. If you’re looking for a value for money phone, then the Xiaomi Redmi 4 is a solid pick.

Xiaomi Redmi 4

Xiaomi Redmi 4

  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Good build quality
  • Compact body
  • Solid battery performance
  • Excellent value for money
  • Bad
  • Average camera performance
  • Hybrid dual-SIM
  • Limited availability
Also See
  • Motorola Moto C Plus (Starry Black, 16GB, 2GB RAM) – OFFER
    Rs. 6,999
  • Samsung Galaxy On5 Pro (Gold, 16GB) –
    Rs. 7,490
  • Xiaomi Redmi 3S (Gold, 16GB)
    Rs. 6,999

2. Yu Yureka Black
Yu had a bit of a slow year last year as it wasn’t prepared for the fast adoption of 4G, but it’s back now and the Yu Yureka Black is a pretty good choice for a good phone under Rs. 10,000. Its display is a little disappointing, but it does well on other fronts, and is a good value for money phone.

The Yu Yureka Black looks good, and has solid battery life and good overall performance, so if you’re looking for a good all-rounder, this phone is a pretty good option in the sub-Rs. 10,000 price bracket.

Yu Yureka Black

Yu Yureka Black

Rs. 8,999
Buy
  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Looks good
  • Solid battery life
  • Decent overall performance
  • Bad
  • Low-light camera performance could be better
  • Screen quality isn’t quite up to the mark
  • Hybrid dual-SIM slot
BUY AT
  • Yu Yureka Black (Matte Black, 32GB) – OFFER
    Rs. 8,999
  • Yu Yureka Black (Chrome Black, 32GB) – OFFER
    Rs. 8,999

3. Lenovo K6 Power
One of the best phones from the last year at this price point, the Lenovo K6 Power is still a good choice if you’re looking for a phone for less than Rs. 10,000, with performance that’s still good enough, and excellent battery life.

The display and camera are also rated very well, but the baseline has shifted up a little since it launched so although it’s still a good phone, it’s not head and shoulders above the others mentioned here, despite what the numbers might suggest. That being said, it’s still a pretty good pick, and it also recently received an update to Android Nougat, making it more value for money than others which are still using Marshmallow. Plus, it’s a lot easier to get your hands on than some of the others on the list.

Lenovo K6 Power

Lenovo K6 Power

Rs. 9,949
Buy
  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Good looks and build quality
  • Decent display
  • Excellent battery life
  • Bad
  • No fast charging support
  • Cameras could have been better
  • No dedicated microSD card slot
BUY AT
  • Lenovo K6 Power (Gold, 32GB)
    Rs. 9,949
  • Lenovo K6 Power (Silver, 32GB, 3GB RAM) – 
    Rs. 9,999

4. Moto G4
Available at just under Rs. 10,000, the Moto G4 is another good mobile with a disappointing camera, which is a common complaint at this price. However, it has a good display and decent performance, and it’s also a good looking device.

Battery life and Motorola’s UI are additional selling points, but the lack of a fingerprint sensor has moved from a minor inconvenience to a telling fault over the months since its launch, as most phones under Rs. 10,000 have started to add this feature.

Motorola Moto G4

Motorola Moto G4

Rs. 9,999
Buy
  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Good screen
  • Decent performance
  • Near-stock Android
  • Good battery life
  • Bad
  • Average camera performance
  • No fingerprint sensor
  • Not worth the price
BUY AT
  • Motorola Moto G4 (White, 16GB) – 
    Rs. 9,999

5. Coolpad Note 3S
The Coolpad Note 3S also released near the end of 2016, and it remains a good all-round pick, thanks to its unique looks and good camera (in daylight conditions).

Relatively weak battery life and middling performance keep it from the top of the list, but there’s not so much of a difference either, so if you like the design and the UI, then this phone might also be a good phone for less than Rs. 10,000.

Coolpad Note 3S

Coolpad Note 3S

Rs. 8,990
Buy
  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Unique looks
  • Good photo quality in daylight
  • 3GB of RAM
  • Bad
  • Weak battery life
  • Relatively unwieldy
  • Non-competitive specs
BUY AT
  • Coolpad Note 3S (Gold, 32GB)
    Rs. 8,990
  • Coolpad Note 3S (White, 16GB) – 
    Rs. 9,799

Other picks
These five phones are our top picks fighting it out to be the best phone under Rs. 10,000, but apart from these, there are a few other phones that you can consider. Looking at older phones, the Micromax Canvas 6 Pro is not a bad choice – it comes with a good amount of RAM, but the battery life and camera are a letdown, and the phone also heats up, so it didn’t make the main list.

Two sub-Rs. 10,000 phones we haven’t reviewed yet, but liked during quick impressions are the Lyf F1s, the Moto C Plus, which launched in December, and May respectively. Both phones have good overall specifications, and the Moto C Plus in particular has really great pricing. The Nokia 3 is another decent addition that looks good on paper, but we can’t recommend it because we haven’t reviewed it, yet.

These are our latest picks for phones under Rs. 10,000 – if you think we’ve missed a good pick that others should know about, let us know via the comments.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv.”]

Spider-Man: Homecoming review – weak webslinger

Spider-Man: Homecoming: ‘bouncy, likable and completely devoid of threat’. Photograph: Allstar/Marvel Studios/Columbia Pictures

Even diehard comic-book movie fans must have noticed by now the glitch in the Avengers universe. Whatever algorithm is used to calculate the perfect ratio of self-satisfied banter to bludgeoning FX has resulted in ever-decreasing variations on a theme. If not quite the same movie, they recycle the same plot points and devices, the same blustering displays of CGI muscle. Deep within the Marvel laboratories, it seems genetic experiments have been taking place as the DNA of the comic-book action flick is spliced with that of other films. Spider-Man: Homecoming is the labradoodle of this cross-genre breeding programme. Part superhero movie, part high-school coming-of-age story, it’s bouncy, likable and completely devoid of threat.

This latest reboot of the webslinger narrative casts Tom Holland as an irrepressible 15-year-old Peter Parker. As eager to please as a puppy, his taste of Avengers action (a cameo at the end of Captain America: Civil War) has left him hungry to right wrongs. So far, more Spider-Boy than man, his ventures have been low-key and the rewards minor (a churro from a nice Dominican lady he helped across the road). But then he stumbles across a crime scene beefed up with some serious alien-sourced weapons tech. And he finds himself on the radar of scissor-winged scavenger the Vulture (Michael Keaton). Meanwhile, in the real world, he struggles with teen angst, high-school social standing and a bruising crush on Liz (Laura Harrier), the unobtainable debate-club beauty.

A deft reveal on the night of the school dance links Peter’s two parallel lives together; but the action climax that follows – a battle fought on the outside of a camouflaged Stark Industries transport plane – is an onslaught of effects so confusing that you forget to worry about the outcome.

In fact, the only moment of real tension in the preview I attended came when my son got his arm wedged in the cup-holder of his chair. Anyone who has ever had to try and prise the arm fat of a panicking child out of a circulation-stopping plastic ring is unlikely to be particularly fazed by the sight of Michael Keatonwearing a beak.

[“Source-theguardian”]