Honor 9i First Impressions: Will It Leave a Mark in Sub-Rs. 20,000 Segment?

Honor 9i First Impressions: Will It Leave a Mark in Sub-Rs. 20,000 Segment?

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Honor 9i has a 5.9-inch FullView display
  • It has 4GB of RAM and 64GB of storage
  • It sports dual cameras at the front and at the back

Honor 9i is the latest sub-Rs. 20,000 entrant to hit the Indian market, relying on features such as its four cameras, and bezel-less FullVision display. The company has been expanding aggressively in India, launching a handset for each key price point, such as the Honor 8 Pro in the sub-Rs. 30,000 segment. So, with the Honor 9i in its portfolio, will the Huawei-owned brand have enough firepower to make a last mark in the segment, which is dominated by the likes of Vivo, Oppo and Samsung? Find out in our Honor 9i first impressions.

 

With the 9i, Honor has a lot of firsts. For starters, this is the first device from the company to sport an 18:9 FullView display. It is also the first to launch with dual cameras at the back as well as the front. So how good is it in the real world? We got to spend some time with the Honor 9i at the company’s launch event and here are our first impressions.

The device looks quite premium. It also feels solid and has a good heft to it. There’s a 13-megapixel primary camera along with a 2-megapixel secondary one on the front, while the pair on the rear consist of a 16-megapixel sensor and a 2-megapixel depth sensor. The camera bump on the back is positioned in the centre of the phone and protrude slightly. While it does seem to have a raised metal trim around it, we are curious to see how it holds up with regular use.

honor 9i front gadgets360 065017 125028 6660 Honor 9i

Power the device on and the big 5.9-inch display fires up giving you the first indication of how thin the borders around it are. Honor has followed the current market trend and opted for an 18:9 aspect ratio for its display. The different aspect ratio results in what’s called FHD+ resolution which is 1080×2160 pixels. At the bottom of the phone, you’ll find an old-style Micro-USB port and a 3.5mm headphone jack along with the loudspeaker. Powering the Honor 9i is Huawei’sown Kirin 659 which is an octa-core processor. There is also 4GB of RAM and 64GB of internal storage which seems to be in line with similarly priced devices like the Xiaomi Mi A1 and the Moto G5S Plus. You do get the option to expand storage using the hybrid dual-SIM slot, at the cost of a second SIM.

Honor has managed to cram in a 3340mAh battery which is good considering its thickness. In our brief time with the Honor 9i, it didn’t exhibit any abnormal drain or heating issues. However, we’ll hold our comments on battery life till we run it through our full review process.

Once powered on, you are treated to EMUI 5.1 running on top of Android 7.0 Nougat. While the basic functionality of the OS is the same, Honor has added a few features.

There are multiple gestures and shortcuts that can be used to get things done. Also, the higher resolution means that most apps will need to be stretched to make use of the entire screen.

honor 9i screen gadgets360 065017 125016 4358 Honor 9i

There is no doubt that the cameras are the highlight of this smartphone. With dual cameras on both sides, Honor is claiming that it is using hardware to create bokeh effects rather than software, which most other manufacturers use. We will test how much of a difference this makes when we conduct our full review.

Priced at Rs. 17,999, it does seem that this phone offers good hardware. With an 18:9 display and four cameras, the Honor 9i could tempt a lot of buyers looking for new features to play with. Stay tuned for our review to see how well it performs in the real world.

honor 9i back gadgets360 065017 125040 9741 Honor 9i

Disclosure: Honor sponsored the correspondent’s flights and hotel for the event in Goa.

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Huawei Honor 9i

Huawei Honor 9i

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

5.50-inch

Processor

2.36GHz octa-core

Front Camera

13-megapixel

Resolution

1080×2160 pixels

RAM

4GB

OS

Android 7.0

Storage

64GB

Rear Camera

16-megapixel

Battery Capacity

3340mAh

Also See
  • Motorola Moto G5 Plus (Lunar Grey, 32GB, 4GB RAM)
    Rs.16,999
  • Oppo F1S (Gold, 64GB) With offer –
    Rs.17,990

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Xiaomi Says It Shipped More Than 10 Million Smartphones Last Month

Xiaomi Says It Shipped More Than 10 Million Smartphones Last Month

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Xiaomi sold more than 10 million smartphones in India
  • It’s a record performance for the company
  • The company also reached a milestone in India

September was a big month for Xiaomi. The Chinese smartphone maker shipped more than 10 million smartphones last month across all the markets where it operates, Xiaomi’s chief executive officer Lei Jun said.

A thrilled and happy Jun, who shared the announcement, thanked employees and partners. The company also reached a major milestone in India. Roughly three years after entering the nation, Xiaomi’s vice president and India head Manu Kumar Jain said the company had shipped more than 25 million smartphones in the country.

The big jump in sales comes as people in South Asian countries including India begin to prepare for the festival season. In India, for instance, Amazon India and Flipkart have been cashing in on the festive season, giving customers lucrative discounts with sales past and sales to come. Xiaomi said last month it had sold more than one million handsets in just two days, a major improvement over its performance in the country last year, when it took 18 days to sell one million smartphones.

Even as Xiaomi has always been known as a company which plays very aggressively, offering some of the best hardware at the price point, the company has appeared more focused in the recent months. It recently launched the Mi Mix 2, a bezel-less smartphone, and Mi A1, its first Android One smartphone for markets like India.

The recent development will help the company better compete with Chinese smartphone maker Huawei, which recently posted better sales than Apple. The company shipped north of 73 million smartphones in the first two quarters of this year, averaging more than 12 million handset shipments in a month. According to marketing research firm Strategy Analytics, Huawei shipped 38.4 million handsets in Q2 2017, while Oppo shipped 29.5 million handsets. In comparison, Xiaomi had shipped 23.16 million handsets in the quarter that ended in June.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Is it okay to skip gears on a manual transmission?

Image result for Is it okay to skip gears on a manual transmission?For those who daily drive a vehicle equipped with a manual transmission, it’s likely a common practice. Rather than rowing through all five or six gears, drivers will skip from third to fifth, fourth to sixth and so on.

But is this practice safe to do? Engineering Explained tackled the common practice in its latest episode and the short answer is yes, it’s perfectly okay to skip gears when upshifting or downshifting. However, both practices should be undertaken with a little bit of background knowledge. For those who have years of experience working a manual gearbox, this may seem like common sense, but for others it’s good information.

When skipping a gear with a manual transmission, it should be noted the revs will take slightly longer to drop from the high revs to the lower revs. If you shift from third to fifth gear and let the clutch out at the same speed as normal, the car will jerk as it works to settle the unbalance. Instead, waiting just a tad longer to let the clutch out will keep things matched equally as the gearbox moves to meet a lower rev level.

When down shifting, it’s a little more tricky. Rev matching is essential when shifting from a low to high gear. For example, if you’re driving along the highway and you want to pass a slower moving vehicle, a shift from fifth to third may be in order. Rev matching the engine to the clutch will keep the car from jerking, and in the worst case, locking up the wheels. When the clutch speed and engine speed meet, they should be in near-perfect harmony. Plus, no one looks good under revving a car while down shifting. Clutch wear will also creep up on you, too.

Finally, another common question is answered: can you start moving from a standstill in a gear other than first? Again, the answer is yes, but it’s going to cause slightly more clutch wear. In first gear, the clutch can be completely released at a lower speed, while in second gear, it takes longer for the engine and clutch to match. It’s not an ideal thing to do, but there aren’t detrimental side effects either. With all of this said, happy shifting.

[“Source-motorauthority”]

Is it good that young people are staying on in education?

Pupils writing

On exam results day, education correspondent Jamie McIvor asks a fundamental and unfashionable question: is it a good thing that more youngsters than ever before stay on at school or go to college and university?

Exam passes are high by historic standards, more youngsters are staying on at school and going to college or university.

Is this a good thing in itself? Or is the education system simply having to adapt to the fact that in the modern world there are fewer good jobs for young people, and that unskilled jobs are disappearing?

It is an interesting philosophical question to contemplate – one quite distinct from the question of ensuring all young people can achieve their potential in education, regardless of wealth or family background.

  • Where to go for help on exam results day

The suspicion of some has always been that the education system has had to soak up youngsters who might otherwise have been unemployed – either because of economic problems or the gradual disappearance of some unskilled jobs.

In the 1970s the school leaving age was raised from 15 to 16 but it took a further 10 years for a qualifications system which had been designed with the more academically-able in mind to evolve.

For many years, youngsters who were not able to study for a full suite of O grades filled their third and fourth year timetables with “non certificate” courses – seen by some as a waste of effort. The boredom these students experienced was blamed by some teachers for indiscipline.

Standard grades were designed to make sure all youngsters could get a meaningful qualification. This underlying ethos has been carried into the current National qualifications.

But in the 1980s it was still unusual for a youngster who was not studying for Highers to stay on until S5. When someone who was not doing Highers stayed on past their statutory leaving age, again the suspicion of some was that the youngster was only at school to “stay off the dole”.

In Scotland the official school leaving age is still 16, but the majority of pupils, regardless of their academic ability, stay on until S6. It is now unusual to leave at the end of S4 and schools would be genuinely concerned if a youngster wanted to leave early without a good reason for doing so.

Positive outcomes

S4, S5 and S6 are now classed as the “senior phase”. The emphasis is on the qualifications a youngster has at the time they leave – not on what they have achieved by a particular stage.

The number of so-called Neets – youngsters who are not in education, employment or training – is at a very low level by historic standards.

The Scottish government guarantees youngsters who are not in a job a place in education or training. It is often the case that a pupil classed as a Neet has a long back story which helps explains the situation.

If a pupil leaves school before the end of S6 because they have secured an apprenticeship or a place at college or university it would be deemed to be a “positive outcome”; if a youngster simply wanted to leave school for a dead-end job a school might worry this was a failure on their part as the pupil may not have been enjoying their education.

Student celebrating exam successImage copyrightAFP/GETTY

The senior phase is designed to offer a flexible system where any youngster can achieve something of value.

For the most academically-able, the question may be what Highers or Advanced Highers they leave school with. For others, it might be about the number of National 4s and 5s they obtain – even one Higher might represent a big personal achievement.

Colleges have been through a huge shake-up in recent years and now concentrate primarily on full-time courses which lead to a recognised qualification – these are mostly taken by students in their teens or early 20s.

Drop-out rate

Privately, some in the college system warn that colleges are having to accommodate youngsters who might otherwise have been unemployed, as well as those who positively want to be studying a subject. This may be reflected in the drop-out rate for some courses.

So we return to the question: is a school system where it is unusual for a youngster to leave early and a college system which has to find places for those who would otherwise be unemployed achieving something positive in itself?

Or is it merely parking the youth unemployment problem, just like non certificate S4 classes in the 1970s?

Boy doing exam paper

Few in the mainstream would seriously argue that educational opportunities should not be as widely available as possible.

But the issue touches on an intriguing question. Once, it was possible to leave school with O grades and get a job with prospects. Not so long ago, many good jobs were available to youngsters with good Highers.

Today, other than modern apprenticeships, most good jobs for young people require a college or university qualification first.

So is the education system having to deal with the practical effect of economic change?

De-industrialisation and automation mean many of the unskilled, entry level jobs once filled by school-leavers no longer exist.

Or are the changes positively helping to provide the workforce the economy needs?

Skilled workforce

The argument is that Scotland, like every advanced country, needs as skilled a workforce as possible to compete internationally and fulfil its potential.

A skilled workforce does not just mean turning out scientists and surgeons – it means hairdressers and staff for the hospitality industry too.

Once, fewer people in those industries would have received any formal college training and might simply have learned on the job or served a traditional apprenticeship. But the argument is that a proper course and training raises standards and allows the best to shine.

Anecdotally, of course, many of the genuinely unskilled jobs which those with few qualifications may once have done – say stacking shelves in the supermarket – are now done by students or those with college or university qualifications who find themselves “underemployed” .

Indeed, while the number of young people at university is close to a historic high, a significant proportion of graduates do not secure what would be seen as graduate-level jobs even if few would do unskilled work for long.

None of this is to suggest a good education is not of value in itself – even if it does not lead to someone getting a better job than they may have got otherwise.

But perhaps it is interesting to reflect on how in the space of barely 40 years, the time someone routinely spends in education has increased. Once, a basic education ended at 15; now few teenagers are completely out of the system.

Source:-BBC