Media giants partner to develop ‘Blockchain Insights Platform’ for video advertising efficiency

Image result for Media giants partner to develop ‘Blockchain Insights Platform’ for video advertising efficiencyComcast’s Advanced Advertising Group, announced that it is developing a new ‘Blockchain Insights Platform’ that it aimed to improve the efficiency of premium video advertising.

The blockchain platform will enhance planning, targeting, execution and measurement across screens. Comcast has partnered with media giants NBCUniversal, Disney, Altice USA, Channel 4 (UK), Cox Communications, Mediaset Italia and TF1 Group (France) for the blockchain initiative.

The announcement was made at the Cannes Lions in Cannes, France and the Blockchain Insights Platform intends to formally launch in 2018. The company is also in discussions with other programmers, distributors, device makers and marketers from the U.S. and Europe.

“Television advertising is an efficient and effective way for marketers and their agencies to reach a large audience, yet today the way advertisers use insights to plan, buy and deliver advertising is limited,” Marcien Jenckes, President, Advertising, Comcast Cable, said. “This new technological approach would make data-driven video advertising more efficient and consumer data more secure. We’ll work with the participants in this initiative to improve ad planning, addressable targeting, execution and measurement, to ultimately create even more value for the television advertising industry.”

Blockchain Insights Platform characteristics include consumer privacy, where each blockchain participant’s data would stay in their own systems and they would continue to manage the protection and privacy of their users. The technology includes a series of encryption and rights management layers that would result in a system that lets blockchain participants in the platform ask questions of each other’s data without having to access or take possession of anyone else’s data to get their marketing questions answered.

Comcast’s Advanced Advertising Group has developed platforms and technologies in order to create simplified solutions that benefits Comcast Cable, distributors, programmers, agencies and advertisers from the U.S. and Europe. The company will collaborate with other media giants to develop the Blockchain Insights Platform.
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Tech Giants and Diplomatic Crises: This Week’s Top 7 Education Stories

The Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg points and smiles while wearing a cap at gown at Harvard's commencement

If Sullivan High School had a motto, it would be “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” Its immigrant population now numbers close to 300—45 percent of the school’s 641 students—and many are refugees new to this country. This academic year alone, the Rogers Park school has welcomed a staggering 89 refugees—nearly three times as many as last year and far more than at any other high school in the city. The recent surge, fueled in part by an influx of Syrians, has turned the school into a global melting pot, with 38 countries and more than 35 languages represented. … How Sullivan got to this point is a fascinating story of a school that not long ago was struggling for survival.

In the space of just a few years, technology giants have begun remaking the very nature of schooling on a vast scale, using some of the same techniques that have made their companies linchpins of the American economy. Through their philanthropy, they are influencing the subjects that schools teach, the classroom tools that teachers choose, and fundamental approaches to learning.

The involvement by some of the wealthiest and most influential titans of the 21st century amounts to a singular experiment in education, with millions of students serving as de facto beta testers for their ideas. Some tech leaders believe that applying an engineering mind-set can improve just about any system, and that their business acumen qualifies them to rethink American education.

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How Will the Qatari Diplomatic Crisis Affect Higher Education?

John Elmes | Times Higher Education

The ongoing diplomatic crisis in Qatar will cause “irreparable reputational damage” to the Gulf as a location for university branch campuses, according to an expert on the region.

Qatar has transformed itself as a global education hub in recent years, hosting overseas outposts of 12 international universities, but faces mounting uncertainty after four Arab states—Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, and Bahrain—cut diplomatic ties. They have also moved to isolate Qatar by land, sea, and air, accusing it of funding terrorist groups.

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Is This the Turning Point for Detroit’s Schools?

Erin Einhorn | Chalkbeat

Detroit schools have been buzzing these last two weeks with what feels like a fresh start. A new superintendent—Nikolai Vitti—has landed in the city and started his job as the first new leader of what is officially a new district. …

But spend a morning in a Detroit classroom and it quickly becomes clear exactly how much will have to change in this city before it looks anything like the “mecca” that Vitti imagines.

The Educational Crusade For News Literacy

Issie Lapowsky | Wired

Checkology is the latest creation of the News Literacy Project, a non-profit founded by the former Los Angeles Times reporter Alan Miller. Since 2009, the tiny eight-person non-profit has been working one on one with schools to craft a curriculum that teaches students how to be more savvy news consumers. Last year, in an effort to scale its impact, the team bundled those courses into an online portal called Checkology, and almost instantly, demand for the platform spiked.

“Fake news is nothing new, and its impact on the national conversation is nothing new, but public awareness is very high right now,” says Peter Adams, who leads educational initiatives for News Literacy Project. Now, Checkology is being used by some 6,300 public- and private-school teachers serving 947,000 students in all 50 states and 52 countries.

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The International-School Surge

Alan Wechsler | The Atlantic

The origins of today’s international schools can be traced to 1924, but they’ve grown exponentially in the past 20 years. Originally created to ensure that expatriates and diplomats could get a “western” education for their children while working in far-flung countries, international schools have found a new purpose: educating the children of wealthy locals so those kids can compete for spots in western colleges—and, eventually, positions at multinational companies.

This dramatic change means increased opportunities for American teachers abroad—and, potentially, increased competition in the U.S. from a new demographic of English-fluent and cosmopolitan young people from all over the world.

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How Income Inequality Stacks up at Stanford

Claire Wang | The Stanford Daily

As of 2013, more [Stanford] students come from the top 1 percent than the bottom 50 percent of the income scale. This statistic is true for the so-called Ivy-Plus colleges in general, which include the eight Ivy League schools as well as Stanford,  University of Chicago, MIT, and Duke.

Amid a host of efforts to make Stanford more socioeconomically inclusive, why does the University’s student body remain so dramatically skewed toward the rich? Despite the expansion of financial aid in recent years, as well as reports of increases in students represented in the lower income quartiles, the lines tracing change in Stanford’s socioeconomic makeup remain remarkably flat. Ultimately, these trends have major implications for promoting social and economic mobility.

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Acquisitions Accelerate as Tech Giants Seek to Build AI Smarts

Acquisitions Accelerate as Tech Giants Seek to Build AI Smarts

HIGHLIGHTS
Major tech companies are betting big on artificial intelligence
As a result, they are ending up in acquiring more AI startups than ever
Apple, Google, Uber, Ford etc., have acquired sizeable number of startups
A total of 34 artificial intelligence startups were acquired in the first quarter of this year, more than twice the amount of activity in the year-ago quarter, according to the research firm CB Insights.

Tech giants seeking to reinforce their leads in artificial intelligence or make up for lost ground have been the most aggressive buyers. Alphabet Inc’s Google has acquired 11 AI startups since 2012, the most of any firm, followed by Apple Inc, Facebook Inc and Intel Corp, respectively, according to CB Insights.

The companies declined to comment on their acquisition strategies. A spokesman for Apple did confirm the company’s recent purchase of Lattice Data, a startup that specialises in working with unstructured data.

The first quarter also saw one of the largest deals to date as Ford Motor Co invested $1 billion in Argo AI, founded by former executives on self-driving teams at Google and Uber Technologies Inc.

Startups are looking to go deep on applications of artificial intelligence to specific fields, such as health and retail, industry observers say, rather than compete directly with established companies.

“What you will see is very big players will build platform services, and startup communities will migrate more to applied intelligent apps,” said Matt McIlwain, managing director of Madrona Venture Group.

Healthcare startup Forward, for example, is using artificial intelligence to crunch data that can inform doctors’ recommendations.
“For people who really want to focus on core AI problems, it makes a lot of sense to be in bigger companies,” said Forward Chief Executive Officer Adrian Aoun, who previously worked at Google. “But for folks who really want to prove a new field, a new area, it makes more sense to be separate.”

Artificial intelligence companies that do remain independent field a steady stream of suitors: Matthew Zeiler, chief executive of Clarifai, which specialises in image and video recognition, said he has been approached about a dozen times by prospective acquirers since starting the company in late 2013.

Clarifai’s pitch to customers such as consumer goods company Unilever Plc and hotel search firm Trivago is bolstered by its narrow focus on artificial intelligence.

“(Google) literally competes with almost every company on the planet,” Zeiler said. “Are you going to trust them with being your partner for AI?”

Tech giants have been locked in a bidding war for academics specializing in artificial intelligence. Startups rarely have the capital to compete, but a company with a specialized mission can win over recruits, said Vic Gundotra, chief executive of AliveCor, which makes an AI-driven portable heart monitor.

“They say, ‘I want to come here and work on a project that might save my mother’s life,'” Gundotra said.

© Thomson Reuters 2017

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Tags: AI, AI Startups, Artificial Intelligence, Uber, Ford, Facebook, Apple, Alphabet, Startups, Apps, Science, Intel

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Tech giants push Congress for k-12 computer science education

A coalition of tech enterprise heavy-hitters and scions of corporate the us have joined forces with a bipartisan group of governors and educators to push Congress for federal funding that would provide eachok-12 scholar in the united states of america the chance to discover ways to code. The institution, a partnership among the computer science training Coalition and Code.org, is petitioning Congress for $250 million in federal investment for the attempt.

amongst those pledging their aid are Apple CEO Tim cook dinner, facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg,facebook COO (and bestselling author) Sheryl Sandberg, invoice and Melinda Gates, IAC Chairman Barry Diller, Walmart CEO Doug McMillion. The tech names are joined by way of California Governor Jerry Brown, Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson, and 26 different kingdom governors, evenly cut up across birthday celebration traces. The educators on board consist of Oakland schools Superintendent Antwan Wilson, NYC branch of training Chancellor Carmen Fariña, and NAACP President and CEO Cornell Brooks, amongothers.

“The breadth of aid suggests that pc technological know-how isn’t only a tech problem anymore, it’s anthe united states hassle,” Code.org founder Hadi Partovi defined to TechCrunch.

“And it is not only a Democrat trouble, it’s the most bipartisan problem inside the U.S.”earlier this yr, President Obama additionally hoped to reignite the united states of america‘s “spirit of innovation,” calling for $four billion to improve pc technology curriculums in each k-12 college across the united states of america. meanwhile, Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, Microsoft and Google have additionally pledged a combined$48 million for coding training throughout the united states.