Five Hacks To Produce High Quality, Low-Cost Facebook Creative Today

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In recent years, one of the most consistent concerns of both existing and prospective clients has been, “how can we generate more high-quality creative quickly and affordably?”

With Facebook favoring video in the newsfeed and Instagram’s rollout of Stories, it’s easy to get overwhelmed and assume regularly producing high-quality creative requires a dedicated design and videography team.

That’s simply not true. From my experience working with many emerging e-commerce leaders, you can achieve your goals — whether they’re increasing engagement, greater click-through rates, or lower cost per acquisition– by following the five strategies below. I’ve seen these strategies used over and over to achieve great results without breaking the bank.

1. Create High-Quality (Not Overproduced) Content

One of the biggest misconceptions of Facebook advertising is that every piece of creative needs to look like it was made by a professional photographer or Hollywood filmmaker. More often than not, creative that looks user-generated will outperform its more polished counterparts. When an ad is overproduced, it can create “banner blindness.” Fast-scrolling thumbs won’t slow down to look at something if it looks too much like an ad. On Facebook and Instagram, ads that look like a photo or video from a friend are more likely to catch a prospect’s attention.

2. Use The Boomerang App

Boomerang from Instagram allows you to create captivating mini videos that play forward-then-backward, creating a neat, GIF-like video loop. These videos are fun, eye-catching and, most importantly, only take a second to produce. Boomerang videos do not include audio, which makes them great for mobile.

One of our clients, Brooklinen, has done a great job using Boomerang in its Facebook Ads. The bedding company created boomerangs of people jumping into bed, putting on a luxe duvet cover, etc. These eye-catching ads increased click-through rates, which in turn created lower cost-per-click and overall lower cost-per-acquisition of new customers. Customers have also responded positively, leaving comments on the ads describing the fun and quirky format.

3. Repurpose Online Reviews

Many online retailers would be surprised to see how many customers have created “unboxing” videos and uploaded them to YouTube. Unboxing is the unpacking of new products, especially consumer products, where the process is captured on video and uploaded to the internet. According to Think With Google, “unboxing fuels anticipation and provides useful product information.”

Many people think that unboxing videos are just for tech gadgets – not true. This same Google publication reports that “Food and drink, fashion and style and mobile phone unboxing videos have seen 42%, 90%, and 200% growth in popularity, respectively.”

Combining user-generated content with useful, relevant product information is a proven winner. Be sure to always reach out to the creator first for permission to use their content.

4. Crowdsource Creative

User-generated content, or user-created content, is any form of content created by customers or end users. UGC most often appears as supplementary to online platforms such as social media websites and may include such content types as blog posts, photos, videos or reviews. Many emerging brands are using UGC in their advertising campaigns as it speaks in the voice of the customer and is highly relatable.

According to the Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers Internet Trends 2017 Report, “Effective UGC can create 6.9x higher engagement than brand generated content on Facebook.”

Many successful brands have leveraged contests to generate more UGC, including one of our clients, MVMT Watches. The MVMT team holds a monthly contest where customers upload photos of their purchase to Instagram using a specific hashtag that enters them into the contest. This contest has generated thousands of pieces of high-quality content that are used in future advertising campaigns. It works because MVMT customers are highly engaged with the visual brand and want to help build the brand, thus creating more customer loyalty and further building brand identity.

Just remember to have clear rules and rights to ownership of content produced.

Forbes Agency Council is an invitation-only community for executives in successful public relations, media strategy, creative and advertising agencies. Do I qualify?

5. Use Snapchat Lenses

If your goal is to reach millennials, pay extra attention to this. According to a TechRadar writer, “Snapchat lenses are augmented reality filters – you’ll typically find these on the selfie camera, but some are available on the rear-facing camera – within the SnapChat app … use these to make your face look like a dog or give yourself a strange hairstyle.” These are fun, social and highly recognizable, which gives your brand familiarity.

These short videos can easily be repurposed and used for Facebook advertising. Another plus: They’re vertical (mobile-first format), which generates a full-screen experience on mobile.

These five tips alone will not create winning advertising campaigns, but they certainly can help take the headache out of creating content. With strong technical knowledge of Facebook advertising and consistent testing, you should be able to easily identify and source the creative that works best for your online brand.

[“Source-forbes”]

Facebook Lite for Android Review: Made for India

Facebook Lite for Android Review: Made for India

While phone makers are now launching 4G handsets and companies like Airtel and Reliance working towards bringing the networks in India, you might think that there’s no need for apps that minimise data use. The fact of the matter though is that even in a metro like Delhi, 3G access depends greatly on which part of the city you’re in at the time.

That’s where Facebook Lite for Android comes into the picture. The app was launched in Asia earlier this month, and on Monday, Facebook Lite became available in India.

Facebook Lite is available on Google Play and it is just 435KB in size, runs on Android 2.2 and above, so even if you’re using an older phone, you can probably take advantage of the application. According to Shankar, Facebook Lite was designed to solve two challenges – 2G Internet and low-end smartphones – and based on our experience with the app, it seems to have accomplished those goals.

What is Facebook Lite?
As the name suggests, Facebook Lite is a light version of Facebook. It looks like an old version of the Facebook app, with blocky looks and limited features. The full-fledged Facebook app has large cards with neat gutters, expands all pictures and fills up your screen, supports gestures to move between the different Facebook functions.

Facebook Lite on the other hand shows all these previews at a much smaller size, and when we were using it on a 2G network, images took forever to show up. The difference between how posts are displayed between the two versions of Facebook is dramatic, and it’s definitely much more appealing to use Facebook on the full application.

facebook_lite_example.jpg

One other thing we noticed as soon as we started the application is that the Facebook logo is absolutely tiny, and this continued as we used the app too – images attached to posts are tiny thumbnails, filling the width of the screen, and they load after you tap on them. On the full Facebook application, images are much bigger, and they’re likely being preloaded, because they popped up in full size as soon as we tapped on the thumbs. The catch is that you’re pre-loading a lot of images you might not want to click on, using a lot of your mobile data along the way.

facebook_example.jpg

Shankar also points out that in the Facebook Lite settings, you can also choose the image quality, between low, medium and high. Facebook uses proprietary compression algorithms to deliver the images at the desired size, without losing too much visible quality.

Overall, the experience of using Facebook Lite is a lot less refined than the full version, but you’re able to see posts and links more quickly while on the road, and you’re using less mobile data to do so as well. All the features you’d expect – the news feed, friend requests, messages, notifications, and search, all show up. You can easily post status updates, or photos, just like you can on the full application. Messenger is built right into Facebook Lite, so you don’t need to have Facebook Messenger installed to chat anymore.

How well did it perform on 2G?
While it’s less refined, Facebook Lite loaded up posts much more quickly than the full version of the app when we switched to Edge connectivity. Usually, when we’re on the road in remote areas, we give up on Facebook because it’s almost certainly not going to load more posts.

The experience with Facebook Lite was a lot closer to using that other social network – Twitter. There are still problems, and posts still take some time to load. Images don’t pop up right away, and take even more time to load. But it does show you new posts and you can at least read what people are saying while you wait for a picture to load, which is a step forward.

Doing all this required some sacrifices. For one thing, the app does not support videos yet, though that is on the roadmap, according to Shankar. It also doesn’t support advanced location features – basically anything that requires the GPS. And while you can post comments on updates and pictures, you can’t reply to comments for now. And while the main Facebook app allows you to work offline, and make post updates when it connects to a network, Facebook Lite does not have this feature.

facebook_lite_settings.jpg

Who should use this?
If you’re using an older Android phone, or if you bought a budget Android device, then the amount of storage available will can often be quite limited.

In such a case, the small size of Facebook Lite might actually be a big plus point, and you might be willing to sacrifice a little bit of the polish of Facebook, but an app that actually works smoothly and loads quickly on your phone which also frees up a lot of space. While Facebook Lite takes less than 1MB, Facebook can be a lot bigger – a few random checks all turned up usage of over 150MB. Smaller footprint also means that app updates take less data.

But the most important thing was that Facebook Lite uses less data. Facebook says that the app gives a reliable experience, even when bandwidth is at a minimum.

That means that if you’ve already started using an LTE connection on your flagship Android phone with a quad-HD screen, then you should will probably find this app boring and pointless. If you spend most of your time at home or in office, with a steady Wi-Fi connection, then you can probably give this app a miss.

On the other hand, if you’re on the move a lot and travel in areas where getting a 3G signal is still a rare thing, or if you’re trying to reduce the data usage you see for Facebook, then this app will be appealing.

On a smaller, lower resolution screen, the difference between the two versions of Facebook wasn’t so pronounced, so you might prefer it if you have an older device, or if you bought a budget phone. And as we mentioned, it will probably be a good idea if you’re using a phone with limited storage space as well.

The app isn’t for everybody, but frankly, the number of people with good connectivity and high-end devices is definitely smaller than people with spotty Internet access and entry-level devices. Based on that, launching Facebook Lite seems like a great move, and will likely find plenty of takers in India.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Facebook Camera Gets Its Own Animated GIF Image Creator

Facebook Camera Gets Its Own Animated GIF Image Creator

When it comes to communication on social media platforms, animated GIF images are perhaps as important as emojis. These two have in a way managed to carve a language for its own and are at times the preferred form of expression than having to type long sentences. GIF images are already popular on Facebook, which just recently added a GIF option in the comments section. Now, the social networking giant is letting you make your own GIFs with the addition of a GIF mode in Facebook Camera.

The new GIF mode in Facebook Camera was discovered by The Next Web’s Director of Social Media Matt Navarra, who reported seeing a new GIF option on the top of Facebook camera. Notably, the feature was found only on iOS and could not be seen on Android, suggesting that it could be rolling out just for iOS as of now. We couldn’t see the feature on iOS either, which means it is yet to roll out to everyone.

fb camera gif creator the next web screenshot fb

As the feature rolls out, users will find the new GIF option when they swipe right to open camera. TNW’s report says that the GIFs created through the feature are short, lasting only a few seconds, which is pretty much how GIFs are meant to be. You will also be able to use Facebook’s effects and frames that were normally available in the camera. The GIF images you make can be saved to your device, posted on your profile or to your Facebook story.

Facebook last month introduced the GIF option in the comments section as part of the 30th birthday of the GIF format. You can already send GIFs on Messenger and Facebook-owned WhatsApp, but the ability to make your own GIFs now means you’ll have more creative freedom in expressing what you what without having to rely and search through existing GIF images. It also means that you won’t have download third-party apps to make your own GIFs if Facebook is baking the feature right into its app.

[“source-gadgets.ndtv”]

BE chats with Facebook Creative Shop’s Juhi Kalia

BE chats with Facebook Creative Shop's Juhi Kalia

For those of us who have kinda sorta heard about Facebook’s Creative Shop but are unaware of what it really does, BE breaks it down:

FB’s Creative Shop is essentially a creative body that helps major brands develop Facebook-specific content and gathers information about how people are consuming ads, and how that data can be used to propel better advertising. The media lab strives to keep a growingly fickle generation engaged for longer with its creative devices by working with creative agencies like Ogilvy and Publicis to create content.

They pride themselves on creating interactive content. Well, they insist on it and that’s what sets them apart from their competitors. For instance, take this Facebook exclusive as conceptualised and created for MJ BALE called Unsuitable Journey:

Watch the ad here

Before joining Facebook in 2016, Juhi Kalia’s career in advertising spanned over 20 years. On the penultimate day of Goafest 2017, she hit the ‘Knowledge Seminars’ stage to talk about how sometimes it’s important to divorce ‘social’ from ‘media’, how Creative Shop is invested in hyper-personalisation of ads, working alongside agencies to create content while avoiding competition and much more.

BE caught up with the head of Creative Shop, India and Indonesia at Facebook to talk about the creative body, understand what sets it apart from a traditional advertising/digital agency and whether it’s time for Facebook to take ownership of content:

Why did you make the transition from working for an ad agency to Facebook Creative Shop? How different is it?

I love advertising and creative work beyond words.

Over the years, I’ve been around many agencies like Ogilvy, McCann, Lowe, JWT- in different countries as well. I just wanted to do something I’d never done before; something that was scary and I’m glad I did, because the journey has been amazing.

What I’ve learned in the last one year has just been insane. In terms of a learning curve, to do something different is exciting. And yet it is similar because it’s familiar and it’s what I do. So, there are differences, but only in the sense of there being a lot of new learnings on behaviour and the science behind it. For instance, now a client may start a brief with data as opposed to just insight. Clients actually say “Hey, let’s look at the data and then cull an insight out of this”. So, there are differences but the storytelling, good ideas, beautiful craft stays.

Do you think Creative Shop is more than just a creative entity at this point? Is this a core business from which you’ll be able to offer other services in the future?

Hmm, not so far. Our intention right now is to enable, guide, co-create for, inspire and sometimes create independently for brands. And sometimes it’s easier to just do it and show it as opposed to talking about it. But at the same time, I don’t really envision us becoming an agency with that kind of scale and workforce. We’re a bunch of four guys and that’s why we have to be very conscious of our bandwidth.

Facebook has always maintained it has no ambitions to be an advertising agency. And yet it has hired some prominent creatives for Creative Shop. What does that indicate?

That there is a need for it! There are so many talented and creative people in the industry and a lot of their time and energy understandably goes into their big TV commercials or big launches- and I get it, that’s the business.

So, you need an engine to keep pushing on ideas and constantly keep educating and experimenting with them. A lot of digital agencies know a lot more but stuff but things change so fast in terms of innovation- there are new updates every week, every day! Or a new format and you go

“Whoo! Cool, what do we do with that now?” So to stay on top of that, is what we’re here for.

Which is the most recent ad agency to approach Facebook Creative Shop in this region?

We have been working quite frequently and quite well with Ogilvy and Vodafone. So, we did something called WPP Creative Ambassadors. It’s a program that we did for a whole day where not just me, but we have someone coming in and talking about media, content, entertainment, digital marketing, branding. So, we dedicated the day to WPP agencies and from that day we focussed on Ogilvy since they leant in as well. We’ve subsequently worked on a few brands with them specifically, Vodafone

[Source:-etbrandequity]