Department for Education discloses gender pay gap

women

The pay gap between men and women working at the Department for Education (DfE) is 5.9%, new figures reveal.

The figure was calculated by how much an individual is paid per hour, so takes account of part-time workers.

The DfE is the first government department to publish the difference between the pay of men and women.

The national gap is 18.1%, but the DfE uses a different methodology so cannot be compared directly to the Office for National Statistics figure.

Education Secretary and Minister for Women and Equalities Justine Greening said her department was setting an example on promoting gender equality.

The DfE reported a mean pay gap – the difference between average salaries for men and women – of 5.3% and a median pay gap of 5.9%.

Pay gap data will be published by all government departments and large private companies by April 2018.

The ONS national gender pay gap for full and part-time workers is the lowest since records began in 1997.

women

Ms Greening said: “I’m proud that the DfE has taken an important step in reporting its gender pay gap, setting an example to other employers as we build a stronger economy where success is defined by talent, not gender or circumstance.

“The UK’s gender pay gap is at a record low, but we are committed to closing it.

“As one of the UK’s largest employers, the public sector has a vital role to play in leading the way to tackle the gender pay gap which is why the DfE’s step to publish our gender pay gap matters.”

The department says it has introduced a range of initiatives to support women in the workplace, such as supporting women returning to work, monitoring pay and helping women progress in their careers.

 
[“source-bbc”]

 

Google Discloses Windows 10 Bug Under ‘Active Attack’; Microsoft Working on Fix

Google Discloses Windows 10 Bug Under 'Active Attack'; Microsoft Working on Fix

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Windows 10 vulnerability is win32k.sys system call
  • Google said it’s being “actively exploited”
  • Microsoft is unhappy with Google going public before patch

On Monday, Google’s Threat Analysis Group published details of a critical vulnerability in Microsoft’s Windows 10 that allows hackers to escape security sandboxes by using a system call with win32k.sys. The reason Google chose to go public with this knowledge is because it believes the vulnerability is being “actively exploited”.

Google had informed both Adobe and Microsoft of zero-day vulnerabilities only 10 days ago on October 21. While Adobe has already issued a patch for Flash – which is available via auto-updater or manual install – Microsoft has yet to send out an update for Windows 10 that blocks the use of this mechanism. And hence, as you’d expect, Microsoft isn’t happy with the disclosure.

“We believe in coordinated vulnerability disclosure, and today’s disclosure by Google puts customers at potential risk,” Microsoft conveyed to VentureBeat via a statement. “Windows is the only platform with a customer commitment to investigate reported security issues and proactively update impacted devices as soon as possible. We recommend customers use Windows 10 and the Microsoft Edge browser for the best protection.”Google’s short disclosure period for “vulnerabilities under active attack” came into effect in May 2013, bringing it down from 60 days to just a week. Google noted that 7 days might be “an aggressive timeline and may be too short for some vendors to update their products” but it justified the urgency of its disclosures by saying that it’s still enough time to inform users and give some advice.

Issuing a fix for a web plug-in such as Adobe Flash is obviously much easier than patching an operating system, which is why Google’s policy for vulnerabilities under active attack has remained controversial. For now, you should check to see Flash is updated and install Windows patches the moment Microsoft issues them.

Tags: Google, Microsoft, Windows 10, Adobe, Adobe Flash
[“Source-Gadgets”]