Mukkabaaz Movie Review: Vineet Kumar Singh Shines In Anurag Kashyap’s Greatest Film

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Mukkabaaz review: Vineet Kumar Singh in a still (Image courtesy: AnuragK2.0)

Cast: Vineet Kumar Singh, Rajesh Tailang, Jimmy Shergill, Shreedhar Dubey, Zoya Hussain

Director: Anurag Kashyap

Rating: Five stars

There is nothing I love more in boxing than the feint. The act of throwing half a punch – the very beginning of the blow, to be precise – in order to bluff and misdirect your opponent, making them bob the wrong way before you hook them right, is elegantly artful. Mukkabaaz does this devastatingly well. As a viewer, it is enormously thrilling when a film threatens or promises to go in one direction, prepares you for it, and heads surprisingly, joyously in another. This is not the film you might expect.

The film opens with a lynching. Worse, it opens with a lynching that is being recorded on a cameraphone, as Muslim cow-traders are beaten and exhorted to say ‘Jai Shri Ram.’ This is horrific, but the two boxers watching the clip later are merely bemused. They identify the goons as fellow fighters, and, walking past one of them, tease him as he cursorily denies the accusations. Their tone is not of admonition and accusation but of jovial jeering, as if a rascal was caught doing something playful. This is what it means to them. These are the boxers of Bareilly, and our hero Shravan Kumar is the best of the lot.

Thus does director Anurag Kashyap double-load the film right from the start, giving us a hero to love – soft-eyed and sincere and spry – while making him worship a rapist like Mike Tyson. Kashyap is at his absolute best in Mukkabaaz, all heart and heartland, a movie made with a vintage filmi sensibility but highly modern skills. And a story that bleeds. The love is pulpy and the revenge served up with masala, and that treatment takes this vital narrative farther.

Our boxer rebels, you see. One sunny day he steps up against his dictatorial boxing overlord, a coach who makes his students carry grain and clean mutton, and socks him in the face. This is not because of righteous indignation – though he claims it is – but because a girl in the coach’s house has arrested his attention and he wants, desperately, to make an impression. He is thrashed, soundly, by several, but he has played his card. He wants nothing more than to be her hero.

She, too, wants a hero. Appropriately named Sunaina – the one with lovely eyes – she is a mute girl who speaks volumes with her giant, limpid eyes, and they gleam as she tries to convince her mother that this boxer is a good idea. The mother has several objections, but she brushes them aside as she imitates Ranveer Singh’s dandruffy Tattar-Tattar dance step to say that Shravan looks at her the way Singh looks at… Looks at who, her mother asks? Sign language is forsaken now as she moves her mouth enthusiastically, with an Indian heroine needing no more than a couple of syllables for complete recognition: Dee-pi-ka.

These lovers are, naturally, star-crossed. He is a boxer with little hope of a fighting future especially after his impulsively-conceived act of defiance, and Sunaina is not just a Brahmin but the niece to the man Shravan punched. There are massive complications, but Kashyap tackles them with a superbly light touch, throwing in crowdpleasing lines and lyrics as well as an overall front-bencher approach that genuinely made me whistle. This doesn’t come at the cost of the film’s politics. Pricklier and slyer than the director has been in the past, Mukkabaaz reaches its dark centre with a scene where neighbours come over and offer what they call mutton to a Dalit coach before there is a power outage. The cow-mob erupts all over the boxers who didn’t know better.

The film has four cinematographers – Rajeev Ravi, Shanker Raman, Jay Patel, Jayesh Nair – and I assume a couple of them were responsible exclusively for the in-ring action, which looks fantastically credible as well as mud-coated and earthy. There is a terrific tracking shot in the beginning, which follows Shravan as he enters the feudal coach’s home, and delivers the grain before looking up and the shot breaks only when he looks up to see Sunaina. It’s a fine looking film, bright and vivid yet shadowy when it needs to be, and the music by Nucleya and Rachita Arora gives it vitality, with some lyrics penned by co-screenwriter Vineet Kumar Singh, who also happens to play Shravan.
His is a tremendous performance, not least because of his staggeringly authentic physicality. Singh looks the part, from the way his t-shirt sleeve cuts into his biceps like tightly tied twine to the agility with which he skips in the ring, and his arduous workouts immediately put glossier Hindi film heroes in their place. He makes Shravan real, when he’s throwing punches as well as when he’s vulnerable. Singh has always been impressive, but this is the kind of breakout performance that will make the country take notice. It’s a knockout. This is a long film, and contains interludes that aren’t strictly necessary – like that of a sadistic boss – but Vineet’s compelling performance makes him a character to root for, and even if we are shown the odds too many times, his triumphs feel earned, they feel good. They feel like our triumphs.

He is also a thickheaded hero, one who beats people up and apologises to them, repeatedly, and the way he looks at his heroine is with reined-in desire, expressing his interest with apologetic eyes, as if he doesn’t dare expect reciprocation.

It isn’t hard to see why he would be smitten. The girl’s hands move faster than his own, while furiously expressing herself via sign-language, sure, but also when she slaps him, which she does hard and with impunity, whenever she needs to make a point. Zoya Hussain is great in an excessively demanding part, mute but loud as can be, the feistiest heroine we’ve had in a while.

Ravi Kishan blew me away with his role as a sincere Dalit coach, one who grew up idolising Pele, wasn’t allowed to box, but is an athlete and sits bolt upright, even when being insulted.

[“Source-ndtv”]

Kaalakaandi Box Office Collection Day 1: Saif Ali Khan’s Film Gets A ‘Slow Start,’ Collects…

Kaalakaandi Box Office Collection Day 1: Saif Ali Khan's Film Gets A 'Slow Start,' Collects...

Box Office: Kaalakaandi: Saif Ali Khan in the film. (Image courtesy: Kaalakaandi Film)

NEW DELHI: 

HIGHLIGHTS

  1. Kaalakaandi features Saif Ali Khan in the lead role
  2. The film grosses Rs. One crore
  3. The film also stars Deepak Dobriyal

Saif Ali Khan’s latest release Kaalakaandi, which opened to positive reviews on Friday, has ‘grossed one crore net’ at the box office on Day 1, Box Office India reported. The film stars Saif Ali Khan as the protagonist, who has been diagnosed with stomach cancer. Saif’s character does not have much time in hand and he realises that he should make the most of the remaining days. Box Office India also reports that because the film is set in the backdrop of Mumbai, it has performed a little better in Mumbai and Pune as compared to other cities. Earlier, of Kaalakaandi, film distributor Akshaye Rathi told Indian Express that the film will perhaps manage a score of Rs.1.5 crores on opening day and that the first weekend collections will be limited to single figures.

Kaalakaandi released at the box office with Anurag Kashyap’s Mukkabaaz and Zareen Khan’s 1921.

1921 was the best out of the three films with collections set to be in the 1.50 crore net range, reported Box Office India while Mukkabaaz had the lowest number with around 75  lakhs net.

In his review for NDTV, film critic Saibal Chatterjee gave Saif’s film 3 stars out of 5. “For cinema trivia geeks, Kaalakaandi is strewn with interesting takeaways. The principal protagonist (Saif Ali Khan), who like the conscientious but dull bureaucrat Watanabe in the Akira Kurosawa classic Ikiru, is diagnosed with stomach cancer and given only a few months to live. The multiple tales unfold in parallel arcs. It is only in the penultimate scenes and a zany final shot that the plot connects a few of the characters but only in a tenuous manner. Kaalakaandi takes a while to warm up but when it does it sets a lively pace, especially in the second half,” he wrote.

Apart from Saif Ali Khan, Kaalakaandi also stars actors like Deepak Dobriyal, Vijay Raaz and Kunaal Roy Kapur.

[“Source-ndtv”]

Honor View 10 Review

Honor View 10 Review

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Honor View 10 is powered by a Huawei Kirin 970 processor
  • It has 6GB of RAM and 128GB of internal storage
  • Dual 4G and VoLTE let you access 4G networks on both SIMs

2017 was the year when most smartphone manufacturers began shifting to 18:9 displays. Honor was one such company, launching one phone after another following this trend. We saw the Honor 9i (Review) and the Honor 7X(Review) being introduced in the sub-Rs. 20,000 segment. The company is now targeting a higher price point with its Honor View 10.

The Honor 8 Pro (Review), its flagship for 2017, managed to shake the market up while competing against the OnePlus 5 (Review). It packed in good hardware and managed to undercut the OnePlus offering on price as well. Now, the Honor View 10 is on the same path, and offerse better hardware to take on the competition. It is powered by Huawei’s latest silicon, the Kirin 970, and has a stronger focus on artificial intelligence with what the company calls a “neural-network processing unit”. Honor claims that the new chip is capable of learning your behaviour patterns, helping you take better photos, and translating multiple languages in real time. So should the View 10 be your smartphone of choice for 2018? We find out.

 

Honor View 10 look and feel

The design of the Honor View 10 is in line with the current market trend of taller screens and narrower borders. It sports a big 5.99-inch display with the 18:9 aspect ratio. It has thin borders on the side and comparatively thicker ones on the top and the bottom. The selfie camera and earpiece grill are above the screen, along with an array of sensors, and there’s a fingerprint scanner below it. Honor offers the View 10 in two colours: Navy Blue and Midnight Black. We had a Navy Blue review unit, and it looked somewhat similar to the colour of the Honor 8 Pro. It’s definitely different and eye-catching.

The View 10 sports a metal unibody. Its flat back has antenna bands running along the top and bottom. It has dual cameras and a single-LED flash at the back, similar in design to the setup seen on the Honor 7X. The lenses protrude out of the body causing the phone to rock when kept on a flat surface. They both have metal surrounds which protect them but feel rough.

Honor View 10 Back Honor View 10 Review

The sides are curved making the phone comfortable to hold, although the flat metal back can be a little slippery in the hand. Honor has positioned the power and volume buttons on the right, and while the power button is easy to hit, you will need to stretch your thumb to hit the volume up button. The hybrid dual-SIM tray is on the left. The View 10 sports a USB Type-C port at the bottom along with a speaker grille and 3.5mm headphone jack. At the top, the View 10 has a secondary microphone and an IR emitter that can be used to control IR devices.

The Honor View 10 has a 3750mAh battery and supports the company’s own Supercharge standard. Sadly, Honor does not ship the required 5V, 4.5A charger with the phone in India. Instead, you will find a standard charger in the box that isn’t as fast. You get a screen protector pre-applied on the View 10, and a clear case bundled in the box.

Honor View 10 specifications

The View 10 is Honor’s new flagship offering, and like other phones at this price, it is loaded with features. The screen is an IPS panel, measuring 5.99 inches with an FHD+ (1080×2160) resolution. Viewing angles are good and the screen was usable under direct sunlight. We liked the output of the display and the fact that the phone let us adjust the colour temperature. Display modes are also provided, which let you choose between neutral and vivid colour reproduction.

The fingerprint scanner below the display is quick to unlock the phone. Honor also claims that the View 10 is capable of using your face to unlock the smartphone, but this feature is not enabled yet. At the time of our review, the Face Unlock feature could only be used to show notifications on the lock screen. Honor told Gadgets 360 that the full feature will be rolled out via an OTA update.

The Honor View 10 is powered by a Huawei Kirin 970 SoC, which is an octa-core processor, with four cores clocked at 2.36GHz and the other four clocked at 1.8GHz. The Kirin 970 has a dedicated Neural Network Processing Unit (NPU) which is tasked with handling Artificial Intelligence functions. Huawei claims that the dedicated NPU computes AI tasks faster than the CPU, while being more efficient. The Face Unlock feature and the cameras on the Honor 10 use this NPU. Honor ships the View 10 with 6GB of RAM and 128GB of storage, which is expandable by up to 256GB using a microSD card in the hybrid dual-SIM tray.

Honor View 10 Screenshot Honor View 10 Review

The Honor View 10 supports 4G as well as VoLTE connectivity on both SIMs, which means that both cards can access their respective 4G and VoLTE networks. With most current phones, only the SIM in the primary slot can access a VoLTE network, but this doesn’t seem to be the case with the View 10. The phone could register our Jio and Airtel SIMs on their respective networks independently. However, this isn’t the same as being a Dual-SIM Dual-Active phone, because when one network is engaged in a phone call, the other SIM is still unavailable to anyone who tries to reach you. Honor has come up with a call forwarding option that lets you transfer calls to the active number automatically. For data, of course, the phone only lets you select a single network at a time.

The View 10’s dual rear cameras consist of one 16-megapixel RGB sensor and one 20-megapixel monochrome sensor. At the front, there is a 13-megapixel selfie shooter that is also used for the Face Unlock feature. In terms of connectivity, the View 10 supports Bluetooth 4.2, dual-band Wi-Fi, NFC, and USB-OTG. For positioning, it has GPS, APS, GLONASS, and BDS.

Honor View 10 software and features

Like all other Honor phones, this one runs EMUI, Huawei’s UI layer on top of Android. The View 10 runs EMUI 8 with quite a few customizations on top of Android Oreo. There is theme support, letting you change the way the UI looks to suit your preferences. Smart gestures help you interact with the phone, such as flipping it over to mute it and picking it up to the screen.

Knuckle gestures let you double-knock with one finger to take a screenshot, or two fingers to begin screen recording. You can also launch apps by tracing letters on the screen. If you think this sounds complicated, it is. Honor has crammed in a lot of such features, and while the screenshot gesture was useful, the others felt gimmicky. We also found a lot of sub-menus in the Settings app, and it was sometimes hard to get to a specific setting without using the search function.

Honor View 10 Network NDTV Honor View 10 Review

Honor offers a one-handed mode which is very useful when handling this big phone. You can also opt to disable the on-screen navigation buttons and instead tap, long press, or swipe the fingerprint scanner to simulate the Back, Home, and Overview button actions respectively. While this is fairly easy, we found it less convenient than a similar implementation on Motorola phones.

For security, Honor offers a Private Space that lets you have a completely different profile secured using a different fingerprint and passcode. File Safe encrypts files on the phone which can then only be decrypted using an alphanumeric passcode or an associated fingerprint, and App Lock lets you restrict access to apps using a fingerprint. While you won’t have to search for multiple apps to do these things if you want them, learning all the features of this phone can be a little overwhelming. You also get dual app functionality called App Twin which lets you run two instances of supported apps.

Honor ships the phone with a few preinstalled apps. Apart from Honor support apps, there are quite a few demo versions of games. To showcase its AI capabilities Honor has also preloaded Microsoft Translator which is not the same as the version available via the Google Play store. While you can chat with other people using text and have it translated on the other end using the regular app, you can also do this with voice on the View 10. It isn’t clear whether this feature is coming to all phones or whether it is exclusive to the View 10 (or other devices with specific capabilities), but we were able to use it with the other party using a Google Pixel 2. It worked fairly well translating between English and Hindi, though context was sometimes missed.

Honor View 10 performance, cameras, and battery life

Flagships aim to provide the best usage experience, and the Honor View 10 isn’t any different. Huawei’s Kirin 970 processor is quite potent and the 6GB of RAM makes usage quite smooth. Apps launch quickly, and multitasking is easy. The View 10 managed to score 173,982 in AnTuTu, and also scored 1,900 and 6,709 in Geekbench 4’s single-core and multi-core tests respectively. This phone managed to surpass the Google Pixel 2 (Review) while coming within striking distance of the OnePlus 5T. In GFXBench, the phone managed 59fps, and 31,347 points in 3DMark Unlimited.

We played Shadow Fight 3 and Clash Royale, and faced no issues with gameplay. Like most other phones with 18:9 screens, many apps and games don’t use all available space and run at 16:9. Honor gives users the option to scale compatible apps to the new ratio. EMUI’s Game Suite feature claims to boost the phone’s performance when gaming, and also suppresses notifications to prevent interruptions and disables the navigation keys to prevent accidental touches. The speaker on the View 10 is loud but is also very easy to cover when holding the phone in landscape mode.

Honor View 10 Camera NDTV Honor View 10 Review

Battery life on the Honor View 10 is decent thanks to the 3750mAh battery. We managed to run the phone past one day with light to medium use, and it could manage one day when we included some long gaming sessions. In our HD video loop test, the phone lasted 11 hours, 14 minutes before running out of juice. EMUI has battery saving modes that limits background activity, disable automatic syncing, and more. Ultra Power Saving Mode restricts the phone to only calls and messages so that it can run for significantly longer. Just like the Samsung Galaxy S8 and the Samsung Galaxy S8+, Honor lets you lower the resolution from FHD+ to HD+ which should be beneficial to battery life. It also has a smart setting which automatically switches resolutions based on what you are doing with the phone.

Other than face recognition and the translator app, the cameras are where the Honor View 10 puts its NPU to use. The camera app will seem familiar if you’ve used other Honor devices, but look deeper and you’ll see that there are more options and an AI-powered scene detection mode. The View 10 uses the NPU to try and understand subjects in a frame and then use the best possible settings according to its algorithms. We found the AI-powered auto mode to be accurate and fast enough to set the scene up before we hit the shutter button.

There’s an Artist mode that lets you apply filters before taking shots. Monochrome mode utilises only the 20-megapixel monochrome sensor to take photos, and the AR mode applies effects after detecting faces. There is Pro mode for photos and videos that lets you manually set different parameters of the camera.

Tap to see full-sized Honor View 10 camera samples

Photos taken with the View 10 are good in daylight when the lighting is favourable. Landscapes are good and colour reproduction is fairly accurate. Objects at a distance do lack detail, but macros are far better in comparison. The camera is quick to lock focus and captures details very well. The View 10 does detect specific subjects such as plants and animals rather than just conditions such as low light, and the resulting settings are fine. However, there’s no way to turn this off to gauge how much of a difference it really makes compared to standard scene detection that many other phones offer. In low light, the View 10 managed to surprise us in a few shots. It was able to capture good details and handled noise fairly well. If the light source is far away, the camera is quite aggressive with noise reduction, which results in loss of detail.

Selfies are usable, and can be enhanced using the beautify mode. Most of the time, the portrait mode worked well in blurring backgrounds and making subjects stand out. If there are multiple faces in a frame, the phone attempts to leave all of them unblurred regardless of depth, which looks extremely artificial.

Video recording maxes out at 4K for the rear camera and you do also have the option to shoot at 1080p at 60fps. The front-facing camera maxes out at 1080p but if you want beautification mode enabled on video, the output is restricted to 720p. Also, we couldn’t find any video stabilisation options on the phone so you will need to have a steady hand while recording.


Honor View 10 in pictures

Verdict
With the View 10, it is clear that Honor is being extremely aggressive in terms of features and pricing. It packs in the latest silicon from Huawei and the AI buzzwords will grab attention in the market. The hardware is all quite capable and is in line with current flagships from other manufacturers. Honor ships the phone with Android Oreo out of the box which is another plus. Priced at Rs 29,999, the Honor View 10 undercuts the OnePlus 5T (Review) on pricing by quite a bit. If you are on the 18:9 hype train looking for a bargain, the Honor View 10 looks like a strong contender at its price.

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Huawei Honor View 10

Huawei Honor View 10

Rs.29,999
Buy
  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery Life
  • Camera
  • Value for Money
  • Good
  • Very good performance
  • Loaded with software features
  • Good camera performance
  • Bad
  • Supercharge Charger not bundled
  • Awkward and uncomfortable camera bumps
BUY AT
  • Huawei Honor View 10 (Midnight Black, 128GB, 6GB RAM) –
    Rs.29,999
  • Huawei Honor View 10 (Navy Blue, 128GB, 6GB RAM) –
    Rs.29,999

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

InFocus Vision 3 Review

InFocus Vision 3 Review

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Vision 3 sports 13-megapixel and 5-megapixel rear cameras
  • The InFocus Vision 3 is priced at Rs. 6,999
  • The phone has sturdy construction and comes with good battery life

In 2018, we can pretty much expect a majority of smartphones to sport trendy 18:9 displays. We’ve already seen this feature trickling down from the flagships that launched this year to several mainstream models. Until recently, it was only the Micromax Canvas Infinity which had this kind of display in the sub-Rs. 10,000 market. However, we weren’t happy with its performance in most areas so it’s not a model we’d recommend.

InFocus hopes to do better where Micromax stumbled, with its new Vision 3 smartphone. It boasts of many of today’s popular features but at a much more aggressive price of just Rs. 6,999. It goes right up against the Xiaomi Redmi 5A, which might not have a fancy looking display or dual cameras but seems like a dependable workhorse. Let’s see how well the Vision 3’s impressive feature list translates to day-to-day usage.

InFocus Vision 3 design and build quality

The Vision 3 predictably has a plastic body, with rounded corners and sides so it’s relatively easy to grip. The display in the front has rounded edges as well, so you don’t have to deal with sharp edges when you swipe the screen from the sides. Due to the taller display, the power and volume buttons are placed a bit higher up than we’d like, which often forced us to shuffle the phone around in order to reach them.

The headphones socket and Micro-USB port are placed at the top and bottom respectively. InFocus has added antenna bands at the top and bottom of the back panel, although we feel that this is more for appearances than functionality as the plastic body shouldn’t cause any hindrance to wireless signals.

There’s a hybrid dual-SIM tray on the right, which accepts either two Nano-SIMs or a single SIM and a microSD card (up to 128GB). There’s a single mono speaker grille at the back, along with the fingerprint sensor and a dual camera setup. We didn’t have any misreads with the fingerprint sensor but it takes longer than usual to wake the screen up. You can also assign a fingerprint to switch on the flashlight or open any app.

InFocus Vision 3 back ndtv infocus

The 5.7-inch HD+ IPS display produces good colours and viewing angles. The resolution of 720×1440 is not the best for a screen this size, and it shows in some of the text in the menus. Touch response is good though. There are narrow borders above and below the screen, but there’s still room for the earpiece, front camera, sensors, and a notification LED.

In the box, you get a Micro-USB cable, a charger, a SIM eject tool, and a warranty card, but no headset. The quality of the accessories seem fairly good, keeping the price in mind.

InFocus Vision 3 specifications and features

The Vision 3 is powered by the quad-core MediaTek MT6737H SoC, along with 2GB of RAM and 16GB of storage. Compared to the Snapdragon 425 that’s in the Redmi 5A, benchmark scores were slightly lower. In AnTuTu, we got 32,633 points while the Ice Storm Extreme test in 3DMark showed 3,637 points. Connectivity options include 4G VoLTE, single-band Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 4, FM radio, and USB-OTG. You also get the basic accelerometer, ambient light, and proximity sensors.

The phone uses Android 7.0 Nougat, with a custom skin called Smile UX. The customisation isn’t too drastic, and mostly involves a few custom icons and a different look for the notifications shade. Some gestures make it easier to use Android on this taller screen, such as the ability to swipe downwards anywhere on the screen to show the notifications shade. However, the text explaining some of the menus and functions isn’t always grammatically correct, and could use improvement. You get some pre-installed apps too such as Amazon’s shopping and streaming video apps, and UC News, and Browser.

InFOcus vision 3 apps infocus

 

InFocus has moved some of the sections in the Settings app around, but it’s not as confusing as some of the other custom UIs we’ve seen. The Special Settings section lets you clone apps, take a screenshot with three fingers, and change settings for screen recording. S Boost is another section with features such as intelligent acceleration, which doesn’t really say what it does but we assume it would free up RAM from time to time. Other options include defragmentation and the ability to mange background apps. You can swap the navigation buttons around or hide them altogether. There’s even an iOS ‘Assistive Touch’ like feature called Suspension Ball, which lets you navigate Android.

InFocus Vision 3 performance, camera, and battery life

The Vision 3 works well for day-to-day tasks such as social media apps, and doesn’t heat up much. The interface is relatively lag-free but every now and then, we did find the phone showing minor signs of stress when loading heavy apps or switching between them. However, it’s quite intermittent and does’t really get it the way of usage. Gaming is also handled decently well, given the HD+ resolution, but we noticed that the phone gets very warm after about 10 minutes of gaming. The Vision 3 runs games fullscreen by default, which means it stretches them slightly. This is noticeable in games that have circular controls, which appear a little skewed. There’s no option in the Settings app to adjust this.

InfOCus vision 3 side ndtv infpcus

Full-HD videos play just fine. The speaker gets loud but can also easily be blocked when you hold the phone in the landscape orientation. The loudspeaker is good enough for voice calls but sounds a little tinny for media files.

Another highlight feature of the Vision 3 is its dual camera setup. The main sensor has a 13-megapixel resolution and an f/2.0 aperture, while the second sensor is a 5-megapixel, wide-angle sensor with an f/2.2 aperture. Switching between the sensors takes a bit of time and you can’t use the secondary camera at all when in video mode. Autofocusing is also slow and there’s shutter lag, which makes capturing fast-moving objects quite tricky. In good natural light, the main sensor is capable of capturing decent dynamic range. The level of detail is strictly average here and we did find some chromatic aberration when zooming in to landscape shots. The wide-angle sensor doesn’t do too well with detail but at least there isn’t too much visible barrel distortion.

The iOS ‘inspired’ camera app offers the standard shooing modes, including professional mode but there’s no option for adjusting focus or the shutter speed. There’s a bokeh mode too but the end result is often below average. InFocus boasts of a ‘dualfie’ feature which lets you shoot with the front and rear cameras at the same time. It’s very similar to the ‘bothie’ feature that Nokia introduced with the Nokia 8this year and has an equally tragic name. Other modes include the ability to enable an InFocus watermark and shoot a collage of four pictures.

Shot with the 5-megapixel wide-angle sensor. Tap to see full-size.

 

Tap to see full-sized InFocus Vision 3 camera samples

 

In low light, close-ups and landscapes appear hazy, with poor detail and colours. Autofocus speeds also dip drastically, forcing you to remain stationary for at least a second or two till the camera focuses and saves each shot. Video recording goes up to 1080p but there’s no electronic stabilisation, which results in shaky footage. The front camera isn’t too bad under good lighting but details are quite soft.

Battery life is good, and we managed to get an entire day’s worth of usage. In our video loop test, we got 12 hours and 12 minutes of continuous HD video playback. However, charging is quite slow. With the included charger, we had to wait almost three hours for the battery to charge fully.

Verdict
InFocus has been very ambitious with the Vision 3, trying to cram in a lot of desirable features for very little money, but not all of it comes together correctly in the end. Its battery life and large display are its main selling points, so if you’ve been waiting for a stylish phone in the sub-Rs. 10,000 segment, then this is worth considering. Everything else is exactly what you’d expect from a budget smartphone. The cameras can give you okay shots in an ideal scenario, but are more often underwhelming. System performance is quite average, the fingerprint sensor doesn’t wake the screen fast enough, and the phone gets warm rather quickly when gaming.

If you’re not in any hurry, we’d recommend holding off on your purchase for a bit as the budget segment will soon be getting a flood of new 18:9 smartphones. Xiaomi has already launched the Redmi 5 in China, and it should sell for well under Rs. 10,000 when it launches here.

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

InFocus Vision 3

InFocus Vision 3

Rs.6,999
Buy
  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery Life
  • Camera
  • Value for Money
  • Good
  • Sturdy construction
  • Good battery life
  • Priced well
  • Bad
  • Weak cameras
  • Heats up under load
  • Sluggish fingerprint sensor
BUY AT
  • InFocus Vision 3 (Midnight Black, 16GB) –
    Rs.6,999

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]