Theatre, fine arts, music: Co-curricular quota admissions to Ambedkar University from Friday

AUD

Students who have excelled in co-curricular activities (CCA) such as sports, theatre, fine arts, debating, creative writing, music or dance may find a special place at Ambedkar University, Delhi (AUD).

The university offers a few supernumerary (extra) seats for those who have great skill in these activities. The applications to these categories will open on Friday.

The online and offline applications to all undergraduate programmes at AUD will close on Friday, after which the students who have already applied can choose these CCA categories.

Applicants can download the CCA application from the website and submit a hard copy of the completed forms with relevant certificates of achievements and portfolio (if any) to the Dean of student services, AUD, by July 1.

Officials confirmed that admissions under this category will be open only to candidates who have already applied to AUD and whose names are not present in the first and second lists of the course/s they have opted for.

The first cut-off list is expected on July 5. The second cut-off list is expected to be released on July 10. Auditions for these seats will begin on July 11.

Candidates applying to the PG programmes under CCA should obtain the minimum eligibility scores in the written test and interview to be considered for admission.

For both PG and UG applicants, a weightage of 30% will be given for interviews conducted by the CCA/sports panel and the remaining 70% will be accredited to the trial result.

Public relations officer Anshu Singh said, “CCA seats are supernumerary. The BA (Honours) programme in Economics, English, Psychology and Social Sciences and Humanities have two seats in each programme under the CCA/sports category. The BA (Honours) programme in History, Mathematics and Sociology have one seat in each programme under the CCA/sports category as these programmes are offered only at the Kashmere Gate campus.”

MA programmes except performance studies, film studies, visual art and literary art have one seat per programme under the CCA/sports category, she said.

These provisions are, however, not available for students of the School of Vocational Studies, School of Culture and Creative Expressions and the School of Business, Public Policy & Social Entrepreneurship.

 

[“source-hindustantimes”]

Dean – Faculty of Fine Arts, Media & Creative Industries

LASALLE COLLEGE OF THE ARTSLASALLE College of the Arts is at the leading edge of contemporary arts education in Asia and works in close partnership with GOLDSMITHS, University of London, which validates its degree programmes and collaborates on teaching exchanges and research initiatives. It has set an agenda for excellence to bring the College to the forefront of international arts pedagogy, practice and research.

The College has implemented a new academic structure, which provides appointment opportunities for a new Dean.

DEAN – FACULTY OF FINE ARTS, MEDIA & CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

The Faculty of Fine Arts, Media & Creative Industries incorporates three schools: McNally School of Fine Arts, Puttnam School of Film & Animation and School of Creative Industries.

The McNally School of Fine Arts continues to lead fine arts education in Asia-Pacific and to produce internationally renowned contemporary artists. It offers Diploma, BA (Hons) and MA programmes in Fine Arts, and the world’s first Masters degree in Asian Art Histories. The School promotes innovation and experimentation in arts practice and research, collaboration across art forms and a critical engagement with Southeast Asia.

The Puttnam School of Film & Animation offers Diploma and BA (Hons) programmes in Film, Animation, and Broadcast Media. These emphasise effective storytelling, multidisciplinarity, and the integration and utilisation of emerging technologies.

The School of Creative Industries covers a range of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes, from Arts Management to Art Therapy, as well as preparatory arts programmes. The School engages in a close and proactive relationship with the creative industries sector, which is growing rapidly in Singapore and attracting significant public and private sector investment.

You will have experience in and commitment to research and artistic experimentation, and proven engagement with the international visual arts community and the creative and professional studies sector. You will have a strong record in teaching, and academic leadership and management roles within higher education.

The Dean of Faculty position provides an exceptional opportunity to contribute to the formulation and development of new strategic initiatives and postgraduate programmes, and to lead outstanding teams of local and international academic staff.

You will be responsible for developing and sustaining an environment of academic and professional excellence; for championing strategic interdisciplinary initiatives; and for nurturing a research culture encompassing both practice-as-research and publication-based outputs. You will foster a positive and collaborative working environment within the Faculty and across the College, develop networks, partnerships and projects with the visual and creative industries, manage financial performance and resource planning, and promote the Faculty’s programmes actively in Singapore and internationally.

Requirements:

  • Relevant postgraduate qualification at PhD level, or equivalent
  • A distinguished specialist in the relevant field
  • Strong leadership, organisational and interpersonal skills
  • Strong Academic leadership and management experience
  • More than 15 years teaching experience at higher education level or equivalent
  • A demonstrable commitment to research, preferably through a successful record of research publications and/or practice-based research outputs
  • A demonstrable ability to initiate interdisciplinary projects/collaborations and partnerships, and to form and lead successful teams.
  • Extensive understanding of academic quality assurance frameworks for learning and teaching within higher education
  • Experience as an external examiner in higher education and/or an external advisor to arts agencies and organisations
  • Ability to work successfully within a multicultural context
  • Strong analytical and problem-solving skills
  • Effective planning and resource management skills

Please submit your letter of interest, current curriculum vitae and any relevant supporting materials, indicating current and expected salary and enclosing a recent passport-sized photograph, by e-mail to: [email protected] or in writing (stating clearly the position applied for on the envelope) to:

Director – Division of Human Resources
LASALLE College of the Arts
1 McNally Street, Singapore 187940

Closing date is 30 April 2016 OR until position is filled.

More information on the Institution can be found at www.lasalle.edu.sg

We regret that only shortlisted candidates will be notified.

[“source-Brit”]

No Need to Fret, Apple Is Doing Fine

No Need to Fret, Apple Is Doing Fine

Let’s get this out of the way first: Despite what you may have heard, the iPhone is not dying. Neither, by extension, is Apple.

It’s true that in an earnings report Tuesday, after weeks of speculation by Wall Street that iPhone sales would finally hit a peak, Apple confirmed the news: iPhone sales grew at their lowest-ever rate in the last quarter. And the company projected total sales of as much as $53 billion (roughly Rs. 3,61,532 crores) in the current quarter that ends in March, which would be a decline of 8.6 percent from last year and Apple’s first revenue drop in more than a decade.

But if Apple is now hitting a plateau, it’s important to remember that it’s one of the loftiest plateaus in the history of business. The $18.4 billion (roughly Rs. 1,25,518 crores) profit that Apple reported Tuesday is the most ever earned by any company in a single quarter.

(Also see:  This Is the Biggest Threat to Apple’s Business Around the World)

It’s necessary to start with these caveats because people have a tendency to react strongly, almost apoplectically, to any suggestion of weakness on Apple’s part. Like pickles, cilantro and Ted Cruz, Apple inspires extreme opinion. The doubters are now ascendant. Apple’s share price has fallen more than 11 percent over the last year, in stark contrast to gains by the other four American tech giants.

So this column will try to do something tricky: explore what’s ailing Apple without going off the deep end. And after talking to several observers who watch the company closely, here’s my ice-cold take:Apple is doing quite OK.

Could it be doing some things better? Sure. Are any of its problems urgent? Not particularly, and from what one can tell, it’s working to address many of its shortcomings. Does it face existential threats? Yes, but no more than any other tech giant. Will it remain an outsize presence in the tech industry for years to come, generating profits on a scale that no other corporation can match? Almost certainly.

(Also see:  Apple’s iPhone Success May Be Reaching Its Peak)

“I’m not worrying about Apple in 2015 or Apple in 2016,” said Ben Thompson, an analyst who runs the site Stratechery, and who questioned Apple’s far-off future in a recent piece. “I’m thinking about the arc of Apple from 1976 to Apple in 2046. The iPhone era has been the pinnacle of everything that Apple does best. Anyone fretting about Apple right now is totally overstating it. But if I look out 10 years, 20 years, each of Apple’s advantages starts to fade.”

I’ll get to those long-run worries in a bit, but let’s start with the present. At the moment, Apple’s biggest problem is its own success. The iPhone turns nine this year. The iPad turns six. These devices have made Apple the world’s most valuable company (until Google’s parent company, Alphabet, overtakes it, which might happen soon).

Apple’s iPhone business is now so huge it sounds almost fantastical – Apple books more revenue from the iPhone (about $154 billion or roughly Rs. 10,50,534 crores in its last fiscal year) than Amazon,Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard or IBM generate from all of their operations. Two-thirds of the world’s countries have gross domestic products smaller than annual sales of the iPhone.

Yet the very dominance of Apple’s aging mobile empire inspires doubts about its future. The bigger the iPhone gets, the harder Apple has to work to beat its previous milestones, and the more vulnerable it appears to some fatal technological surprise.

The primary criticism of Apple’s recent performance is that it’s doing too much, and as a result, the general quality of its products has slipped. Related to that is the notion that Apple has lost some of its innovative and design magic. It has put out a larger-than-usual number of features and products that have failed to thrill reviewers. As Gizmodo put it in a headline summing up 2015, “Everything Apple Introduced This Year Kinda Sucked.”

Apple still does noteworthy new things, but I can understand Gizmodo’s frustration. The Apple Watch is a work in progress. Apple Music and Apple News feel awkward, far less pleasant than dedicated music-streaming and news apps that have long been available in the app store (like Spotify and Flipboard). The Apple TV offers little I couldn’t get on other devices, and its remote is heroically unfriendly. And 3D Touch and Live Photos, the new features in the latest iPhone, are nice but not groundbreaking.

But there’s something worth keeping in mind about each of these criticisms. They’re the gripes of a technophile, and they don’t necessarily reflect mainstream consumer perceptions about Apple’s products.

“Most of these critics are those who spend most of their time in this world of Apple analysis, so of course they’re hypersensitive to their devices,” said Horace Dediu, a fellow at the Clayton Christensen Institute, a think tank, and an analyst who follows Apple at his site, Asymco.

Dediu said customer satisfaction data showed continuing love for everything Apple sold. Almost everyone who has purchased an Apple Watch loves it. The same is true for iPhones and iPads. Apple’s crash logs show that its software isn’t getting buggier, contrary to what heavy users might think. “And people have short memories – they forget that the first iPhone was also full of bugs, that things in the past weren’t perfect,” he said.

Dediu is one of a chorus of analysts who argue the iPhone is far from its peak. With incremental improvements to the device’s interface and capabilities, Apple can add more than enough to keep people hooked to its devices. He calls the current peak in sales a “localized peak” – a blip from which Apple will soon emerge. In a piece last fall, I echoed this theory that the iPhone can’t lose; so has Thompson.

But if continued growth sounds like wishful thinking, there’s another path for Apple to prosper even if iPhone sales do hit a wall: Suck more money out of each phone. In a note to clients last fall, analysts at Goldman Sachs suggested that through a widening number of subscription services baked into the iPhone, Apple could begin to reap a huge monthly fee from its users, which it said constituted “the most lucrative installed base in the world.”

It’s an argument Apple executives are starting to vocalize loudly. On Tuesday’s earnings call, Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive, said the popularity of the iPhone provided the company a “long-lasting foundation.”

Apple’s ecosystem is so sticky that people tend to flock to its services even if there are better products out there. Even if I’m not a fan, 10 million people have subscribed to Apple Music in its first six months.

Given all these options for minting bullion from the iPhone, the most alarming worries for Apple aren’t about the present. They are about the future beyond the horizon, and they are necessarily speculative.

The basic question is this: In the future, will physical devices matter less than they do now? If computers are more like the machines in the movie “Her” – ethereal, ambient computers that exist in the cloud, that respond to our voices and our bodies, anticipating our desires – what will happen to Apple then? This is a company whose entire existence hinges on the cultural appreciation of physical things. Can it prosper in an age of ambient computing?

These are interesting questions to pose. I had a long conversation with Thompson about these ideas, and Apple’s apparent weaknesses – how it’s not as good at artificial intelligence and voice recognition as Google, how it lacks the cloud infrastructure that Amazon has built, and how, most important, its entire corporate culture is geared toward making actual stuff, which could limit its capacity to create fantastic online services.

But ultimately the discussion felt academic. It seems obvious that as the tech world changes around it, Apple, over the next decade, will need to reinvent itself. But so will everyone else. That is just what you do in this industry.

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Amazon Faces US Fine for Failing to Report Injuries

Amazon Faces US Fine for Failing to Report Injuries

Amazon.com Inc. failed to report at least 26 work-related illnesses and injuries in a New Jersey warehouse last year, a federal agency said, the latest indication that low-wage employees who rush to fetch online orders often bear the pain of the speedy, convenient delivery of goods.

The Seattle-based Web retailer faces a $7,000 (roughly Rs. 4.6 lakhs) fine and demands to change its warehouse work environment, according to a citation. The action stems from a July inspection by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration that Amazon failed to report workplace injuries and exposed employees to amputation risks and failed to provide protective gear. Medical personnel hired by Amazon also provided services beyond their expertise when tending to workers’ medical needs.

As Amazon’s online sales have grown analysts project revenue will climb 20 percent to $107.2 billion this year so has its need to expand its network of fulfillment centers and hire more workers to complete online orders. During the latest holiday shopping season, the Web retailer added more than 100,000 extra staff, who pick items in warehouses as large as several football fields. In 2013, a temporary worker at an Amazon warehouse in New Jersey was crushed to death in a package-sorting conveyor system.

“Failure to properly record occupational illnesses and injuries is hazardous to workers,” said Paula Dixon-Roderick, director of OSHA’s Marlton Area Office. “The lack of accurate data can mask patterns of injuries and illnesses that could help uncover conditions with the potential of putting workers at risk. In addition to keeping accurate records, Amazon should address the potential dangers identified in the hazard-alert letters to ensure the safety and health of its fulfillment center employees.”

Craig Berman, a spokesman for Amazon, didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

The federal agency said warehouse workers are exposed to stress from repeated bending at the waist during shifts lasting 10 hours or more and that the “on-site medical unit provided medical care beyond what is allowed by their licensing and certification, without the supervision of a board-certified qualified medical professional licensed to practice independently.”

The citation gives Amazon 15 business days to pay the fine and comply with OSHA’s requests, seek an informal conference with the agency or contest the findings before the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

[“Source-Gadgets”]