Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III Review

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III Review

HIGHLIGHTS

  • It features 24.1-megapixel APS-C sensor with Dual Pixel autofocus
  • Image stabilisation works well but there’s no 4K video recording
  • The G1 X Mark III is priced at Rs. 79,990

Canon’s PowerShot G1 X Mark III camera is the successorto the company’s G1 X Mark II, and features big upgrades over it. This new model also happens to be Canon’s first point-and-shoot camera to have a large APS-C sensor, while still keeping the overall size and weight very pocket-friendly.

In India, the PowerShot G1 X Mark III is priced at Rs. 79,995, which puts it in the premium segment of point-and-shoot cameras, along with Sony’s RX100 V. However, its large sensor could give it an edge over the competition. We’ve been testing it for about a week, and here’s what we think.

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III design and build

Canon seems to have done a great job with the design, managing to fit a large APS-C sensor in a body that measures just 51.4mm in thickness weighs just 399g, including the battery and memory card. It’s not as tiny as Sony’s RX100 series models, but it should fit snugly in a large jacket pocket. The body is constructed out of a magnesium alloy, which makes it tough, and there are dust- and water-resistant materials and seals all over the camera. There are rubber inserts around the hand-grip area too, which we like, and all the plastic parts have slightly textured surfaces so you get a good grip.

Canon G1X Mark III top ndtv canon

 

The G1 X Mark III has a single rotating ring around the lens which can be set to either change the zoom level or focus for each of the PSAM modes. You also get an autofocus illuminator light and a front command dial, which can be used to change the shutter, aperture, etc, depending on which mode you’re in. The dial is easy to reach and use, but on the flip side, it’s too easy to turn mistakenly when shooting, especially when you’re pointing the camera at yourself. We found our thumb inadvertently rubbing against it a couple of times when we were testing this camera.

Coming to the top of the device, we have a pop-up flash and a hot shoe in the centre, the mode dial on the left, and the power switch, shutter button and exposure compensation dial on the right. The mode dial has a button in the middle that needs to be pressed in order to turn it, like on higher-end DSLRs. This ensures that you don’t accidentally change modes when shooting. The shutter button has a very short travel to the half-way mark when you’re focusing, but then needs a firm press to actually take a shot. On the right, there’s a flap which protects the Micro-USB port, Micro-HDMI port and remote switch terminal, but there’s no provision for plugging in an external microphone or headphones. There’s also a dedicated Wi-Fi button, which takes you directly to the connection screen, without having to power on the camera first.

Canon G1X Mark III back ndtv canon

 

At the back of the G1 X Mark III, we have a fully articulating 3-inch touchscreen with a resolution of 1.04 million dots. The display has good brightness and even at the default level, we didn’t have any issues when using it outdoors under sunlight. There’s also a built-in OLED electronic viewfinder (EVF) with a decently high resolution of 2.36 million dots and a 100 percent coverage area. There’s a sensor beside the eyepiece that automatically switches between the LCD display and the EVF when you put the camera up to your eye. There’s a second control dial on the rear with a four-way navigation pad, with shortcuts for changing the focus, drive mode, flash setting, and the amount of information displayed on the viewfinder. There’s a dedicated video recording button as well, along with an autofocus selector (single point, zone or subject tracking), an AE lock button, and the menu and playback buttons.

Overall, we found the G1 X Mark III to be very comfortable to use in most situations. Its compact body makes it easy to carry around, the buttons have good tactile feedback (although most sit a little too flush with the body), and you can get a firm grip on it even if you have moist hands.

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III specifications and features

The PowerShot G1 X Mark III boasts of a 24.2-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor and Canon’s recent DIGIC 7 image processor which is also seen on some of the company’s DSLR models such as the EOS 77D (Review). This camera offers 3x optical zoom with image stabilisation through its 15-45mm lens (24-72mm, 35mm equivalent). It has an f/2.8 aperture on the wide end and an f/5.6 aperture on the telephoto end.

Canon G1X Mark III ports ndtv canon

 

Compared to most other point-and-shoot cameras in this price range, the lens here isn’t very bright. Hopefully, the large sensor (compared to the 1-inch sensors typically used by such cameras), should compensate for the narrower aperture. ISO sensitivity ranges from 100-25,600 in any of the program modes but is restricted to ISO 3200 in Auto mode. Burst shooting tops out at 7fps on the High setting, which is pretty respectable. You get 49 autofocus points and support for capturing RAW image files. We found that the buffer of this camera is good for about 21 continuous shots, after which it starts slowing down. Plus, you’ll also need to wait a bit till all the images are saved to the SD card after each burst.

The video recording resolution tops out at 1080p 60fps, which is a little disappointing considering that 4K support isn’t uncommon in this price segment, even from point-and-shoot cameras. The G1 X Mark III also has the Dual Pixel autofocus system which we’re seeing being used more and more on many of Canon’s recent launches. This lets you perform smooth focus shifts between your subject and the background, and it works wonderfully in video too. You can even achieve advanced tricks like focus pulling by simply tapping different areas that you want to shift focus to.

Touch-and-drag AF is an interesting feature, which lets you used the touchscreen to drag the autofocus reticule around, when looking through the EVF. The camera also features a built-in ND filter, bracketing options, and a new panorama mode. The latter is available for selection in the SCN shooting mode and automatically stitches a panorama as you pan the camera about. You can choose the direction you intend to pan in, and then simply hold the shutter button down till you’re done. The end result is pretty good. Other scene modes include fish-eye effect, toy camera, and HDR.

Canon G1X Mark III front dial canon

 

The camera has built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and NFC, so it works with Canon’s Camera Connect app on Android and iOS. We’ve used this feature before with previous Canon cameras and what it essentially does is lets you use your smartphone as a remote viewfinder and quickly transfer images form the camera to your phone. There’s support for a single SD card, which is placed in the battery compartment, on the bottom of the camera.

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III performance and battery life

In our ISO test, the level of sharpness was maintained very well till about ISO 800. Even at ISO 3200, noise was kept in check but details got slightly softer. When we got to ISO 12800, the camera’s noise reduction seemed to soften the image quite a bit, causing a loss in detail. At the highest ISO level of 25600, there was a bit of noise, the detail level was low, and the overall image looked very soft. You can set the ‘High ISO Noise Reduction’ feature to low, which does reduce the amount of softening, but it can’t be turned off.

Canon G1XMIII ISO ndtv canonISO test

 

In daylight, focusing speed was good and the tiltable display made it easy to frame shots, especially if our subjects were at an obscure angle. When subjects were against bright sunlight, we noticed a bit of chromatic aberration around the edges, but this wasn’t prevalent in all our landscapes shots. However, the level of detail was good and there was good colour saturation. The camera does tend to boost reds a bit more than other colours, which we noticed in a couple of different sample shots.

Object tracking worked quite well on moving subjects. In macro shots, we managed to get decently good separation between our subject and the background, across the focal range. However, macros weren’t very sharp, even at the widest end of the lens. The level of detail and the colours were good, but images were noticeably soft when we checked them out at 100 percent zoom.

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III sample: ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/1000sec, 45mm (tap to see full-sized image)

More daytime landscapes samples: Sample 2, Sample 3, Sample 4.

 

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III sample: ISO 1000, f/5.6, 1/20sec, 43mm (tap to see full-sized image)

More daytime macro samples: Sample 2, Sample 3, Sample 4.

 

In low light, noise reduction could get a bit too intrusive when we weren’t keeping an eye on the ISO level. Even when set to Low, the noise reduction feature tended to muddy details, so it’s best to either limit the ISO to about 6400 if you’re leaving it in Auto, or set it manually, especially since you can’t open the aperture wider than f/2.8. Having said that, we did like the dynamic range that the larger sensor offers. Continuous autofocus works well too, offering smooth transitions as you pan about. Macros were once again not the sharpest at night, but the camera did deliver pleasing bokeh blobs, when there were light sources in the background.

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III sample: ISO 2500, f/4.5, 1/20sec, 24mm (tap to see full-sized image)

More low-light landscape samples: Sample 2, Sample 3.

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III sample: ISO 3200, f/5.6, 1/20sec, 45mm (tap to see full-sized image)

More low-light macro samples: Sample 2, Sample 3.

 

The in-built stabilisation compensates for hand shake by up to four stops, and this works well for stills and video. Video recording maxes out at 1080p, and during the day, we noticed a good amount of detail to our subjects as well as saturated colours. The zoom is a lot slower when shooting video, so you get a nice smooth effect. The camera maintains sharpness quite well even at the telephoto end when shooting under natural light. In low light, video footage exhibits decent dynamic range but it does get a little noisy. The Dual Pixel autofocus continues to work well too.

The size of this camera makes it great for vlogging, but the audio captured is strictly okay. It would have been a great tool for YouTubers if it had a microphone input, but sadly it doesn’t.

The battery is rated to last 200 shots per charge, which isn’t very good. In our experience, switching to Eco mode and turning the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth off when not needed allowed us to get roughly 260 shots and a few video clips on a single charge. Without Eco mode, we found that the battery level dropped a lot quicker. Overall, battery life is quite mediocre but you can charge the camera using a power bank, if that’s any consolation.

Verdict
Canon’s G1 X Mark III is a fun little camera that offers features typically found in Canon’s DSLR and mirrorless camera lineup, in a highly compact body. It does cost a premium, and at this price (or lower), you can find mirrorless cameras that offer 4K video recording and have better stabilisation, plus other advanced features. However, mirrorless cameras aren’t quite as compact, especially with their lenses, so they can’t really match the slimness of the G1 X Mark III. Sony’s RX100 V is the obvious alternative at this price, and it offers higher resolution video recording, faster burst shooting, a wider aperture, and super slow-motion video, to name a few features.

The APS-C sensor on the Canon offers good dynamic range but its full potential isn’t quite exploited due to the relatively narrow aperture. Close-up shots could have been sharper and the noise reduction at high ISO levels was too intrusive at times. Support for 4K video recording and an external microphone would have made this a better overall package.
Price (MRP): Rs. 79,995

Pros

  • Weather-resistant body
  • Compact and lightweight
  • Dual Pixel AF works well
  • Good dynamic range
  • Fully articulating touchscreen

Cons

  • High price
  • Weak battery life
  • Macros are a bit soft
  • Intrusive noise reduction at high ISOs
  • No 4K video or microphone input

Ratings (Out of 5)

  • Build/Design: 4
  • Image Quality: 3.5
  • Video quality: 3.5
  • Performance: 3.5
  • Value For money: 3
  • Overall: 3.5

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Canon EOS 77D Review

Canon EOS 77D Review

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The EOS 77D features a 24.2-megapixel sensor and 45 autofocus points
  • ISO performance is very good and the Dual Pixel AF works well
  • The Canon EOS 77D is priced at Rs. 59,995 for the body only

Earlier this year, Canon refreshed its mirrorless and enthusiast-level DSLR lineup with the introduction of the EOS M6, EOS 77D, and EOS 800D. Going by Canon’s numbering scheme, the new 77D and 800D DSLRs are aimed at beginners with some enthusiast-level features for when they master the craft over time. The new models also make some higher-end features, like the Dual Pixel autofocus system, more accessible to users.

Today, we’ll be testing the EOS 77D, which slots in just below the EOS 80D and above the 800D. The EOS 77D and EOS 800D are priced within Rs. 10,000 of each other and are very similar in terms of features, except that the 800D lacks a secondary LCD and a few shortcut buttons, which is one of the reasons it costs less.

Let’s see if the Canon EOS 77D makes a strong case for itself as a value-minded semi-enthusiast DSLR.

 

Canon EOS 77D design and build quality

The 77D has a plastic body which, at 540 grams, is lighter than that of the 80D. There are rubber grips on either side for your palms and another at the back for your thumb. This model lacks any form of weather sealing but we found that it can handle a light drizzle without any fuss.

On the left side, we have flaps covering the remote control terminal, external mic socket, Micro-HDMI port, and an old-styled Mini-USB port. The NFC contact point for pairing is also placed here. The mode dial is placed on the top left of the camera with a locking system, and a power switch that lets you jump straight to video mode. The optical viewfinder uses a pentamirror to reflect light from the lens to the viewfinder rather than a pentaprism, which is generally heavier and more expensive to implement. We also have a hot shoe terminal and a built-in pop-up flash above the viewfinder. An infrared sensor turns the LCD off when you bring the camera up to your eye.

Canon 77D flip lcd ndtv canon 77d

To the right of the viewfinder, we have another cluster of buttons for live view, AF-On, and magnification. A second control dial lower down also doubles up as a four-way navigation pad. The multi-function lock switch at the bottom can be used to lock the primary or secondary dials or the touchscreen. The secondary LCD lets you check settings like ISO, aperture, shutter speed, battery level, and the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth status at a quick glance. The articulating 3-inch LCD has a 1,040k dot resolution and supports two-finger multi touch input. The touchscreen can be used for changing settings in the menu and viewing pictures.

We received an 18-135mm EFS lens with the body, which can be bought as a bundle from Canon. The lens features a built-in image stabiliser, aperture of f/3.5-5.6, and a switch to lock the lens when not in use.

Canon EOS 77D features and specifications

The Canon 77D features a 24.2-megapixel APS-C sensor with Canon’s new DIGIC 7 image processor. Light sensitivity ranges from ISO 100 to 25,600, shutter speed ranges from 30 to 1/4,000 seconds, and the burst shooting tops out at 6fps. The camera has 45 autofocus points, all of which are cross-type, along with phase detection pixels on the sensor for video and live view. The latter is what enables the 77D to seamlessly switch focus between subjects when shooting video, which is a big advantage compared to most DSLRs which rely on the contrast detection AF system alone. Unfortunately, video recording maxes out at 1080p at 60fps, which is a bit disappointing.

Canon 77D top LCD ndtv canon 77d

Some of the notable improvements however lie in the firmware. The Canon 77D has something called ‘Guided Mode’, which can be enabled for the shooting screen, menus, and the mode guide. This gives you a visual representation of what you can expect from shots based on which way you adjust the slider. So for instance, say you’re shooting in aperture priority mode, the graphical representation on the screen shows you what sort of effect you can expect by decreasing or increasing the aperture. This encourages you to use the touchscreen, by making the icons larger and easier to use.

Hitting the ‘Q’ button at the back gives you quick access to toggles including white balance, drive mode, picture size, metering, type of focus, etc. You can either use the touchscreen or either of the two dials to manipulate the settings.

The Creative Filters option on the mode dial lets you add effects such as soft focus, fish-eye, etc to your photos. You even get special filters for video like a film-grain effect, miniature, black and white, and more. The Custom Functions option in the menu lets you access features like the expanded ISO mode, which bumps up the maximum ISO to 51,200; adjust the level of exposure increments (one-third or half); toggle the state of the AF assist beam; and more.

Canon 77D dial ndtv canon 77d

Canon EOS 77D performance and battery life

We begin with the ISO test to gauge how this camera handles noise when the ISO level is pushed upwards. It’s also a good indicator of how the camera performs in low light. One thing to keep in mind is that the Canon 77D only allows ISO jumps at full stops, and you cannot make adjustments by one-third or half a stop. We start at ISO 800 as there’s no discernible difference in image quality between ISO 100 and that level. Sharpness goes down a notch at ISO 3200 but the image is still noise-free. At ISO 6400, we begin seeing a small amount of noise in the shadows. At the highest ISO level, details start to deteriorate but there’s still no visible chroma noise, which is quite impressive.

Canon EOS 77D ISO test – tap to see full-sized image

The EOS 77D works with the Canon Connect app for Android and iOS, for remote shooting and transferring files to your smartphone. Even when paired using Bluetooth, the camera will need a Wi-Fi connection to your device, even if you want to simply view the photos on the camera. With the dedicated Wi-Fi button, you can jump to a list of previously paired devices or set up connections to a Wi-Fi printer, a desktop PC (through the EOS utility), or a cloud service through the Canon iMAGE Gateway. This is the same as we saw when reviewing the Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II .

The buttons on the Canon 77D have good tactile feedback and fall in place under your fingers nicely. The power lever felt a bit stiff and rough, but other than this, we didn’t have any issues with usability. The fact that there’s no headphone socket might frustrate those who want to use this camera for professional recording.

Canon EOS 77D sample: ISO 640, f/4.56, 1/60sec, 35mm (tap to see full-sized image)

Canon EOS 77D sample: ISO 1250, f/5.66, 1/128sec, 93mm (tap to see full-sized image)

In daylight, the 77D does a good job of capturing accurate colours and good detail. We found that the 18-135mm lens isn’t all that sharp, and this is evident in the slightly soft macro shots we got. There is very mild chromatic aberration in some scenes but it’s mostly kept in check. Thankfully, we didn’t have trouble with other artifacts like barrel distortion in our pictures.

Canon EOS 77D ‘Grainy B/W’ sample: ISO 6400, f/5.6, 1/80sec, 135mm (tap to see full-sized image)

The Creative filters are where you can really have some fun. ‘HDR art standard’ combines three consecutive exposures to give you an HDR photo, while ‘HDR art bold’ boosts colours to give you an oil painting effect. ‘Grainy B/W’ is another effect (seen above) which we found quite useful. There are similar effects for videos too, which add a fun element to shooting. Burst mode works well although 6fps isn’t ideal for fast-moving animals or birds. The camera’s high ISO prowess can be seen in low-light shots. Details were maintained fairly well and noise was kept to a minimum even when we had the ISO set to Auto.

Canon EOS 77D sample: ISO 800, f/4.5, 1/25sec, 35mm (tap to see full-sized image)

Canon EOS 77D sample: ISO 100, f/18.2, 16sec, 24mm (tap to see full-sized image)

The 77D has good video capabilities thanks to the Dual Pixel AF system. Autofocus mode includes subject tracking, smooth zone AF, and 1-point AF. Subject tracking works decently, but if your subject’s motion is too erratic then the camera has a tough time keeping up. The phase detection system shifts focus between subjects smoothly, without any focus hunting lag, or the irritating motor sound that plagues most DSLRs. You can use the touchscreen to shift focus too. Another neat feature is electronic image stabilisation, which has two levels. With it enabled, frames are cropped a bit but the end result is more stable footage.

The 77D is rated at 600 shots per charge and we managed to come close to this number during our review period, but features like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth do have an impact here. Your mileage will vary drastically depending on if you have these features on or not.

Canon 77D hand ndtv canon

Verdict

The Canon EOS 77D is a feature-packed DSLR that’s positioned just below the EOS 80D in Canon’s lineup. If you don’t need the secondary display on the top or the second control dial at the back, then the slightly less expensive 800D could serve you just as well, as its features are pretty much identical to those of the 77D. New additions like the guided mode and Dual Pixel autofocus are great to have, but we also wish that this camera supported more current-day features like 4K video recording and maybe finer controls over the ISO level.

The Canon 77D gives you all the flexibility of a DSLR plus good battery life and a variety of inexpensive lenses to choose from, and video performance is also much better now.  If you buy this camera with the 18-135mm kit lens, the price shoots up to Rs. 89,995, which feels a bit too expensive. While the lens is versatile enough for close-up and long-range shooting, we would have liked more sharpness in our images. If video is what you’re after then you should consider a mirrorless camera like the Sony A6300, which retails for around Rs. 67,000. It doesn’t have the best battery life or a very user-friendly interface like the 77D, but you do get much better video capabilities like 4K recording, much faster autofocus, and burst mode.

Price: Rs. 59,995 (body only)

Pros

  • Very good high-ISO performance
  • Built-in Wi-Fi
  • Fast autofocus for video
  • Decent battery life
  • Novice-friendly interface

Cons

  • No 4K video recording
  • Basic ISO adjustments
  • Burst shooting isn’t impressive

Ratings (Out of 5)

  • Build/Design: 4
  • Image Quality: 4
  • Video quality: 4
  • Performance: 3.5
  • Value For money: 3.5
  • Overall: 3.5

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

iPhone 6s, PlayStation 4, Canon EOS 700D, and More Tech Deals

iPhone 6s, PlayStation 4, Canon EOS 700D, and More Tech Deals

This week we have a great entry-level DSLR from Canon, Lenovo Ideapad 2, Apple’s iPhone 6s and a lot more with discounts and offers.

1. Canon EOS 700D DSLR camera
In the market for a DSLR that offers the right combination of pricing and features? The Canon EOS 700D might be a perfect fit. The DSLR is now down to Rs. 36,900 (MRP Rs. 44,995) this week. The camera ships with 18-55mm and 55-250mm IS II lens and freebies such as a standard 8GB memory card, carry bag, and a JBL Go portable speaker. The Canon EOS 700D is one of the finest entry-level DSLRs in the market. The camera features an enhanced autofocus with a 9-point cross-type auto focus system. The EOS 700D includes a 3-inch touchscreen display to enable you to view images, pick auto focus points, and access other camera controls. This bundle is just about perfect for a personal purchase or if your partner would prefer it as a gift this Valentine’s.

canon_eos_700_d_jbl_amazon.jpgPrice: Rs. 36,900 (MRP Rs. 44,995) Link: Amazon

2. Apple iPhone 6s 128GB rose gold
The top variant of the latest iPhone is down to Rs. 60,499 (effective after cashback) on Paytm. That’s less than the initial launch price of the iPhone 6s 16GB when it first arrived here. If you are looking to commit to a smartphone for a longer period of time, the 128GB variant of the iPhone 6s would be just perfect at this price point. Use the coupon code A6K to get a cashback of Rs. 6,000 in your Paytm Wallet. The iPhone 6S features a 4.7-inch Retina Display. There’s a 12MP primary camera at the back and a 5MP front-facing camera. The iPhone 6s comes with a new feature called 3D Touch which enables you to access specific controls using pressure sensitive gestures on the screen.

Price: Rs. 60,499 (MRP Rs. 82,000) Link: Paytm

3. Sony PlayStation 4 ultimate player edition
If you missed it the last time around, the deal on the PlayStation 4 Ultimate Player Edition is back. You can grab the console for as low as Rs. 30,720 (effective after cashback) on Paytm. This edition ships with two free games including God of War remastered and Infamous Second Son. The console is selling out real quick, you could select other sellers in case you get the sold out error on the product page. Almost all sellers are selling the console at this price. Use the coupon code CONSOLE18 to get 18% cashback in your Paytm Wallet. The 1TB console gives you enough space to store a large number of games if you buy them digitally.

sony_playstation_4_1_tb_ultimate_player_amazon.jpgPrice: Rs. 30,720 (MRP Rs. 37,990) Link: Paytm

4. Logitech X100 portable speaker
The Logitech X100 is a portable speaker with Bluetooth support that packs in a punch in a small form factor. The speaker is now down to Rs. 1,419 (MRP Rs. 2,995) for the black coloured variant. You can connect your devices to the speaker using Bluetooth, stream music and it can also take care of your phone calls. The in-built battery promises to last around 5 hours on a full charge, for playing music. The battery takes around 3-4 hours to charge completely. The speaker is quite decent if you are in the market for a basic wireless speaker at this price point. It also includes AUX input in case you want to connect it using a cable.

Price: Rs. 1,419 (MRP Rs. 2,995) Link: Amazon

5. Lenovo Ideapad Flex 2
The Lenovo Ideapad Flex 2 is down to Rs. 32,999 (MRP Rs. 42,990) on Amazon this week. The laptop is powered by an Intel Core i3 processor clocked at 1.7GHz, supported by 2GB of RAM. It comes with a 500GB standard hard drive and an 8GB SSD. The SSD can be used to load the operating system quickly or, if you prefer, your favourite applications and data. The laptop features a 14-inch multi-touch display, running at a resolution of 1366×768 pixels. There is one USB 3.0 port, two USB 2.0 ports, a single audio jack for headphone and microphones, one HDMI port and a memory card reader on the laptop. The Lenovo Ideapad Flex 2 runs Windows 8.1 out of the box. You will be able to upgrade it to Windows 10 using Windows Store.

Price: Rs. 32,999 (MRP Rs. 42,990) Link: Amazon

6. Toshiba Canvio Connect II 2TB
The Toshiba Canvio Connect II 2TB hard drive is down to Rs. 5,949 (MRP Rs. 17,000) on Snapdeal. The portable hard drive comes with 10GB of cloud data storage and a USB 3.0 interface. The hard drive also offers 256-bit encryption and the ability to restore data with the click of a button. You can also access your hard drive’s content remotely via the internet. The hard drive can also stream digital content to your device using Toshiba’s mobile apps. The portable hard drive works with both Windows and Mac OS X based computers and laptops. The hard drive will come with the standard 3-year warranty in case anything goes wrong.

toshiba_canvio_connect_2_tb_snapdeal.jpgPrice: Rs. 5,949 (MRP Rs. 17,000)

Link: Snapdeal

[“Source-Gadgets”]