CAT 2018 Exam Concludes, Results In January; Read Slot 2 Analysis Here

CAT 2018 Exam Concludes, Results In January; Read Slot 2 Analysis Here

CAT 2018 analysis: Slot 2 over, results expected in January

New Delhi: The CAT 2018 slot 2 exams were started at 2.30 PM and by 5.30 PM today. With this, the CAT 2018 or Common Admission Test 2018 for the admission of various Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs) across the country is over now. While commenting on the difficulty level of the CAT 2018 slot 2, an expert said the both the slot 1 and slot 2 were similar in nature while VARC and DLIR sections were bit tougher in the afternoon session. A candidate who attended the exam said, in the CAT 2018 slot 2, the DLIR questions were tougher than other two sections.

IIM Calcutta, the official organisor or IIM CAT 2018, conducted this prestigious management entrance exam for more than 2 lakh students in various centres across the country in two slots or shifts. The first shift was concluded on 12.15 pm in the afternoon today.

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Mercury Sulfate Category – Procurement Insights and Spend Analysis by SpendEdge

Mercury Sulfate Procurement Report. (Graphic: Business Wire)

LONDON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–SpendEdge, a global procurement intelligence advisory firm, has announced the release of their ‘Mercury Sulfate Market Procurement Report.’ The insights and data provided in this report provide a strategic analysis of the supply markets, factors influencing purchasing decisions, procurement best practices, pricing models, supplier landscape, and an analysis of the supplier capability matrix for the chemicals industry. This report breaks down the data and analysis behind the procurement of mercury sulfate and acts as an all-inclusive guide for making smart purchasing decisions.

“The demand for mercury sulfate is highly dependent on end-user industries such as chemical, consumer electronics, automobile, and pharmaceutical,” says SpendEdge procurement analyst Tridib Bora. “Also, the suppliers in the mercury sulfate market are involving in M&A to enhance their production capabilities and increase their geographical presence across niche penetrated regions,” added Tridib.

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Procurement analysts at SpendEdge highlight the following top three market trends that are contributing to the growth of the Global Mercury Sulfate Market:

  • Increase in the use of mercury sulfate for water treatment
  • Increase in R&D investments to meet industry-specific requirements
  • Rise in M&A activities

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Increase in the use of mercury sulfate for water treatment:

Globally, the gradual rise in the sea levels has resulted in the need for improving the water treatment of water bodies. The procedure involved in the water treatment includes the addition of mercury sulfate, which separates the sulfate by forming methylmercury. In addition, the use of mercury sulfate also helps the buyers for the treatment of freshwater, and the treated water can also be used for domestic requirements.

Increase in R&D investments to meet industry-specific requirements:

Globally, the suppliers are steadily improving their investments in R&D to increase their production capabilities to meet the specific requirements of the end-user industries. The industry-specific grades are offered with varying properties and purity levels based on end-user applications of mercury sulfate. In addition, a gradual increase in the R&D investments also helps the buyers to adhere to regulations such as ECHA (EU), FDA (US), and EPA (US), which are set forth by the government.

Rising M&A activities:

The mercury sulfate market is highly fragmented with the presence of numerous regional and global suppliers across the globe. This has prompted the suppliers in the market to increase their M&A activities to reach out to a wider target audience. Moreover, it also helped the suppliers to strengthen their financial, technical, and production capabilities.

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Related Reports:

  • Global Crude Oil Category – Procurement Market Intelligence Report
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  • Global Fertilizers Category – Procurement Market Intelligence Report
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About SpendEdge

SpendEdge shares your passion for driving sourcing and procurement excellence. We are a preferred procurement market intelligence partner for Fortune 500 firms and other leading companies across numerous industries. Our strength lies in delivering robust, real-time procurement market intelligence that helps sourcing and procurement professionals make informed decisions. These innovative procurement solutions help enterprises transform structural capabilities, improve execution efficiency, and fast-track time to savings.

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Residential Solar-Plus-Storage Economic Analysis 2018: Insights From AZ, CA, HI and MA

Image result for Residential Solar-Plus-Storage Economic Analysis 2018: Insights From AZ, CA, HI and MA

The economics of solar-plus-storage are changing. This report explores several key cases of utilities that are introducing new rate structures which radically alter the case for solar-plus-storage, though they do not necessarily make this configuration a better choice than solar alone. The results of GTM Research’s analysis reveal an interesting picture for a market in transition, where in some cases solar-plus-storage is nearing competitiveness with solar-only, while in others, solar-plus-storage remains far from economical.

The report examines the key markets of Arizona, California, Hawaii and Massachusetts, which are in the process of rate reform and thus merit study to understand the economic case for solar-plus-storage. It also presents a discussion and economic results for several utilities in these markets.

[“Source-greentechmedia”]

Insights from statistical analysis of great (and not-great) literature

Ben Blatt’s Nabokov’s Favorite Word Is Mauve: What the Numbers Reveal About the Classics, Bestsellers, and Our Own Writing takes advantage of the fact that so much literature has been digitized, allowing him to run statistical analyses on writers, old and new, and make both fun and meaningful inferences about the empirical nature of writing.

Blatt’s book covers everything from James Joyce’s use of exclamation points (1,105 !’s per 100,000 words) to the most distinctive words appearing in erotica whose authors hail from New York City (“subway, popsicle, senator, butthole, museum, landlord, thrusted, Jacuzzi, sin, and shrugs”).

Dan Piepenbring’s review of Mauve highlights the implicit social insights that can be gleaned from this sort of analysis (“Male authors are far likelier to write ‘she interrupted’ than ‘he interrupted'”), and also the way that the book made him feel about his writing.

“The written word and the world of numbers should not be kept apart,” Blatt writes, and I think he’s right; what’s frustrating is that no one has yet figured out how they might productively collaborate. Like last year’s “The Bestseller Code,” which described an algorithm that predicted the plots of popular novels, “Mauve” wagers that the “digital humanities,” as they’ve uneasily come to be known, can instruct audiences outside of the academy. The book’s finest moments prove that they can—but to what end? Blatt argues that his work is “not an attempt to ‘engineer’ art as much as a way to understand it”: “If you were a band in the 1960s you would want to know how the Beatles were recording their songs.” Maybe so, but is that really what this book professes to teach? Knowing the rate at which Ringo hits his snare drum does not a Beatle make.

Reading “Mauve,” I began to imagine two duelling schools of authorship, both motivated by statistics. In one, writers would cultivate their tics, inhabiting themselves so thoroughly that to encounter them on the page would be like finding their footprints in wet cement. In the other, writers would aspire to defy the data, styling their prose with such intricate, chameleonic grace that no statistician could betray their identity. A few decades ago, the advent of the word processor made it easier than ever to revise on the fly; it also made it easy to dwell on one sentence ad infinitum, gilding the lily where once one would’ve advanced to the next thought. The glut of data is another mixed blessing—past a certain point, writers would do better in a state of blissful ignorance. Otherwise, they might end up with work like my ninth-grade term papers, mannered and overwrought.

Nabokov’s Favorite Word Is Mauve: What the Numbers Reveal About the Classics, Bestsellers, and Our Own Writing [Ben Blatt/Simon & Schuster]

The Heretical Things Statistics Tell Us About Fiction [Dan Piepenbring/New Yorker]

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