CAT 2018 Exam Concludes, Results In January; Read Slot 2 Analysis Here

CAT 2018 Exam Concludes, Results In January; Read Slot 2 Analysis Here

CAT 2018 analysis: Slot 2 over, results expected in January

New Delhi: The CAT 2018 slot 2 exams were started at 2.30 PM and by 5.30 PM today. With this, the CAT 2018 or Common Admission Test 2018 for the admission of various Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs) across the country is over now. While commenting on the difficulty level of the CAT 2018 slot 2, an expert said the both the slot 1 and slot 2 were similar in nature while VARC and DLIR sections were bit tougher in the afternoon session. A candidate who attended the exam said, in the CAT 2018 slot 2, the DLIR questions were tougher than other two sections.

IIM Calcutta, the official organisor or IIM CAT 2018, conducted this prestigious management entrance exam for more than 2 lakh students in various centres across the country in two slots or shifts. The first shift was concluded on 12.15 pm in the afternoon today.

[“source=cnbc”]

9 Takeaways You Need To Know About Education And Tuesday’s Election

Education issues in the elections.

With the midterms on Tuesday, we’ve devoted our weekly roundup to focus on education’s role in the election. Here are our nine takeaways of key issues and trends to watch:

1. Teachers are flexing their (political) muscles

With just days to go, both of the major teachers’ unions have devoted their considerable resources to the election.

The American Federation of Teachers has its members on the ground, making calls and knocking on doors, for more than 100 key Senate, House and gubernatorial races.

While the AFT is focused more on national races, the National Education Association (the largest U.S. teachers’ union with nearly 3 million members) is primarily targeting state and local races.

This shouldn’t be a surprise. This has been a year packed with teacher activism. There were walkouts and demonstrations in five states. What did they want? Their main concerns were better pay and working conditions. Arizona, West Virginia, Colorado, Kentucky and Oklahoma are also states with some of the lowest education funding rates in the nation, as well as very low rates of teacher pay.

For education advocates, conversations on funding education are long overdue.

In a report, the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities called the last 10 years, “A Punishing Decade for School Funding.” Twenty-five states are still providing less total school funding per student than they were in 2008, according to this report by the AFT.

2. Keep an eye on the governor’s races

Education is the No. 2 issue in campaign ads for governors, according to the Wesleyan Media Project. It falls to 15th when you look at federal races, says Travis N. Ridout, the project’s co-director. This, he explains, is reflective of the importance of states vs. the federal government in setting education policy.

There are 36 gubernatorial races on Tuesday. Seventeen of those, because of retirements and term limits, will see a new governor in office. And 12 states will elect governors who appoint the state school chief (often called a superintendent).

New Mexico and Maryland are two states where the governor will have to make tough choices right away: rewriting the formula used to determine how funds are distributed to schools.

3. Follow the money

Voters in Georgia, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Colorado, Missouri and Utah will see education funding measures on the ballot. All told, these could add $2.6 billion for early childhood, K-12 and higher education. That’s according to the Center for American Progress.

“We’re seeing voters are looking to find ways to increase state funding for public education,” says Jessica Yin of CAP. (You can read the full report here.)

Colorado is considering the biggest increase in education funding: $1.6 billion. Amendment 73 proposes to create a Quality Public Education Fund through tax hikes for corporations and individuals who earn more than $150,000 a year.

4. ‘Non-traditional’ funding sources

Three states are looking at new sources of education revenue.

Michigan is mulling whether to legalize recreational marijuana. If approved, 35 percent of excise taxes on weed in the state would go towards K-12 education, with the rest of the revenue devoted to local governments and road repairs. Voters in Missouri are considering a similar measure. If passed, the proposal would legalize medical marijuana and funnel tax revenue towards veteran healthcare and early childhood education.

(The idea to fund education by taxing marijuana sales has appeared on state ballots before. Voters in Nevada, Oregon and Colorado approved similar measures, since as early as 2012.)

Maryland, meanwhile, is looking at casino revenue to support early education, career and technical education, dual enrollment programs and more. The measure is anticipated to generate at least $750 million in supplemental funding from 2020 to 2022.

5. A “blue wave?”

Many Democrats are predicting an anti-Trump blue wave that will lead their party to take the House. Democrats only need 23 seats to take control. The numbers, however, seem less favorable to Democrats when it comes to taking over the Senate.

So what does that mean for education policy?

Democratic control of the House could bring a new push to update the Higher Education Act. This is the main federal law governing approximately $120 billion in annual federal financial aid spending through grants, loans and work-study. It also covers anti-sex discrimination rules found under Title IX. The legislation was first passed in 1965 and last updated in 2008.

In the past year, both parties submitted their own bills with — wait for it — major differences. The two sides are currently are at an impasse, particularly on guidelines for federal student aid and regulations of for-profit colleges. A Democratic majority in the House could allow for enough bipartisan cooperation to pass a renewal, says Bethany Little, a principal of the Education Counsel, an educational consulting firm.

6. The DeVos factor

The controversial U.S. Education Secretary, Betsy DeVos, has been mentioned in $3 million worth of political TV ads and dozens of Facebook ads, overwhelmingly Democratic, according to a new analysis by Politico.

In races and states where public education is a big issue, her work advocating for vouchers and charter schools, scaling back civil rights protections for students, and siding with loan servicing companies over student borrowers could motivate many voters, even though DeVos’ name isn’t on the ballot.

7. Key Race: Arizona governor

David Garcia, a professor at Arizona State University, is running on the Democratic ticket against incumbent Republican Gov. Doug Ducey.

Ducey is campaigning on how he ended the teacher walkouts this spring: by signing a bill that promised a 20 percent raise to teacher salaries. NPR has reported that the legislation does not require that every teacher get a 20 percent raise.

The race could be a nailbiter. Garcia has attacked Ducey’s record on education but has faced a “crush of spending from incumbent Ducey and his allies,” reports Bret Jaspers of member station KJZZ.

Arizona will also be voting on the future of school vouchers. Proposition 305 will try to expand the state’s voucher program from special-needs students to all students in the state.

Republican Ducey is a firm supporter of charter schools in the state, saying he’s skeptical of the “profit motive” of charter institutions.

8. Key Race: Wisconsin governor

Democrat Tony Evers, the current superintendent of public instruction, is up against Republican incumbent Gov. Scott Walker, with education as the spotlight issue of the race.

About 40 percent of voters there put K-12 education as one of their top two issues, according to polling by Marquette University Law School.

Public education has experienced a bumpy road in Wisconsin since Walker took office in 2011. Funding for K-12 schools saw a $749 million cut during Walker’s first two years in office. Last year, the state boosted funding by $649 million, a figure Walker has frequently cited in his campaign ads.

Although Wisconsin wasn’t a part of the 2018 wave of teacher walkouts, teachers there did express their brooding discontent in 2011. Teacher unions in the state lost collective bargaining rights when Walker passed an anti-union act.

(Following its passage, median salaries dropped by 2.6 percent and median benefits by 18.6 percent, and many teachers left their jobs, according to the left-leaning Center for American Progress.)

Evers is proposing increased investment in all levels of education, from early childhood through higher ed. Polling suggests Evers has an edge with independents, but according to Shawn Johnson of Wisconsin Public Radio, “Wisconsin’s Republican Party has a proven record of getting its voters to turn out.”

9. One key congressional race

Keep an eye on this one: West Virginia’s 3rd Congressional district. It’s an open seat in an impressively red district that’s currently held by a Republican, and yet Democrats see a chance to flip it blue.

Polls suggest a competitive race between two state lawmakers: Democrat Richard Ojeda and Republican Carol Miller.

Ojeda is a state senator, army veteran and former high school teacher. Miller is a member of the state House of Delegates and a small business owner.

As state senator, Ojeda has been a fierce advocate for education, including better pay for teachers. He became the face of teacher walkouts in the state earlier this year, to the point where some protesters chanted his name, reported Politico.

For her part, Miller has focused her campaign on economic growth, particularly for the coal industry, gun rights and combating the opioid epidemic.

Miller is a pro-Trump candidate, riding on the tailcoat of the president’s success in the region. Ojeda, on the other hand, has vocalized regret for voting for Trump in 2016. (In 2016, 73 percent of voters in the district voted for President Trump.)

[“source=ndtv”]

The cofounder of Chairish talks about what’s hot in vintage decor

Anna Brockway, cofounder of online marketplace Chairish and a former vice president at Levi Strauss, is known for her taste-making style and loves flea markets, Delft blue and white planters and Vladimir Kagan mohair sofas. She knows a lot about what vintage and antique pieces are in demand by what people are buying and selling on her site.

Brockway joined staff writer Jura Koncius last week on The Washington Post’s Home Front online chat. Here is an edited excerpt.

Q: What’s trending in art? Is the gallery wall over?

A: Right now, we are seeing lots of interest in Pop art. (Think large-scale, bright colors and ironic takes on commercial themes.)

As for your second question: Long live the gallery wall! We have seen piqued interest in a new take on it, though – more like a tile look where pieces by the same artist in a similar theme, shape and frame are used in large grid configurations. It’s a more sophisticated, and maybe a little calmer, take on the gallery wall approach.

Q: We live in a mid-century home and own almost exclusively pre-1970 furniture/decor. Our family room sofa has seen better days, and we’d like to replace it with a washable slip cover with a mid-century modern look. Do you have any suggestions?

A: I would recommend a simple Lawson (or square) arm sofa with a tailored slipcover. Look for a low profile to match the rest of your design.

Q: I’ve just started antique hunting for my home. What are some vintage home decor items I should look out for?

A: I would recommend starting with vintage rugs, lighting (like table lamps) and occasional pieces (ottomans and small side tables). These will add personal style to your space as you start to develop your own vintage aesthetic and usually aren’t big financial and space commitments.

Q: I love the sturdiness and quality of older furniture. How do I make these pieces more transitional? I see ” just slap some white paint on it” all over Pinterest, but there must be another way to respect the piece and give it a new home.

A: Making traditional brown furniture relevant is all about context. Two tips: I like it when a traditional piece is used in a highly edited room with lots of negative space around the piece. In other words, get rid of the clutter! This allows the beauty, solidity and character of the traditional piece to really be appreciated.

Secondly, surround the piece with a light color. The main thing that you want to avoid is the heavy, all-dark look, and that can be accomplished through the thoughtful use of color.

Q: What’s the trend in vintage metals? Is brass still hot? Is vintage moving to a postmodern phase? Are the 1990s back? What’s your favorite mix of periods, textures and colors?

A: For metals, we’ve seen a sustained interest in brass. But I will say that I love it when folks fearlessly mix metal types for a more eclectic look! It’s tricky, though, and sort of “advanced decorating.” The safest move would be to pick a lane and stay there.

Regarding postmodern, we do see a growing following for Memphis inspired design. I happen to love postmodern accents and think they are especially chic when partnered with traditional French pieces. It is a very sophisticated juxtaposition.

Q: It seems that antique and vintage oak furniture is “out.” Have you seen this trend and if so, why do you think that is? Are there any types of oak antique furniture that are in demand?

A: I grew up in California where for a long time oak furniture was popular. You are right that in its original form, oak is not super happening right now. However, we do see designers using cerused finishes to update these pieces. The finish takes the yellow out and puts an emphasis on the texture of the oak.

Q: I’ve been seeing lots of lacquered furniture and vintage Chinoiserie used by designers for the past six years or so. Do you see this lasting?

A: I do. Lacquered pieces are a surefire way to bring color and sparkle into a space. And chinoiserie is just a chic classic that pairs well with so many styles. I love it mixed with midcentury modern styles especially.

Q: I am trying to sell some of my parents’ Danish contemporary rosewood furniture. Someone from a local mid-century modern store is interested in the dining room chairs, but not the table. Am I going to have trouble selling the table without the matching chairs?

A: I would sell the chairs. The trend is toward mixing tables and chairs types for an eclectic look.

Q: What fashion trends are you seeing translate into the home?

A: Animal prints have been all over the catwalk, sidewalk and are now really a staple in home decorating. You can see animal prints in seating, pillows, rugs (my favorite) and lampshades. Patterned and pleated lampshades are a whole other trend we are digging!

Q: What do you see as the glaring trends on the West Coast vs. the East Coast? Is it boho on the West and industrial on the East, as I suspect?

A: One of my favorite parts of my job is seeing local differences in style and taste.

My experience is that it’s not really a regional difference but actually varies city by city, or even neighborhood by neighborhood! For example in Los Angeles (especially in neighborhoods, like Silver Lake) you can see more of a boho vibe, but I also see lots of Santa Barbara-style Andalusian looks in Pasadena, modern farmhouse in the Palisades, Art Deco glam in parts of Beverly Hills and unabashed, sleek mid-century modern style in the Hollywood Hills.

Texas also intrigues me. Houston homes often feature lots of smashing French antiques while Dallas embraces contemporary art and midcentury modern. More generally though, if pushed I would say the East Coast runs more traditional (and loves a window treatment) while the West Coast leans toward a more casual vibe.

Q: Rattan, bamboo and wicker seem to be popular in interiors now. Is it OK to use it in places other than a porch or sunroom?

A: Yes please! We see wicker, bamboo and rattan appearing indoors regularly and we love the whimsy, lightness and freshness it brings to a space. It’s chic!

Q: I am new to having anything other than a dorm to decorate, so please bear with me. But I see all this talk about trends – what’s in, out, etc. – in home design but I don’t understand how people decorating their own houses are supposed to respond to that. Are people actually expected to redecorate their houses continuously to reflect what’s “in”?

A: Ha! This is a fun question. Like any style-related category, trends come and go but good, classic basics remain (like Levis). Most folks today think of their home as an expression of their personal style – much like their clothes – and want to change things up regularly. My recommendation is to start with seating and table pieces that you love (I’ll call these “commitment pieces”) and look to art, lighting, rugs and occasional tables and chairs for freshness. How often the refreshing happens is up to you. I will admit to being a serial re-decorator (hence, why I started Chairish) but that’s me!

Q: Are bar carts too overdone? If so, what would you have instead?

A: I happen to find bar carts really useful for entertaining. They have gotten a lot of attention lately, but I remain a fan. That said, nothing is prettier for a party than a gorgeously abundant bar laid out atop a buffet or console table. A classic, good look and equally practical.

Q: What’s your favorite item in your home?

A: I have a massive, clear Murano chandelier in my oval dining room that was a wedding gift from my mom and stepdad (they purchased it while traveling in Venice). It’s never going for sale on Chairish!

Q: While I don’t like the idea of a formal dining room, my husband is threatening to put a Ping Pong table in there. Help! What to do?

A: Formal dining rooms are often underused, so I appreciate your question. I am not sure you will want to tell your husband this, but I have seen ping-pong tables that transform into dining tables. (Just sayin’ . . .)

Because most dining rooms are adjacent to the kitchen, modern families often repurpose their dining rooms into family rooms while perhaps including a smaller table for intimate dining. It’s a practical choice that presents a host of fun decorating options!

Q: I’m 25 and just setting up my first apartment. What’s the one thing I should splurge on?

A: Because you likely have a few moves ahead of you, I would recommend you invest in art you love! It’s easy to transport to a new space and your ability to incorporate these pieces in future homes won’t be constrained by floor plans.

[“source=businessinsider”]

Higher education in India gets a Rs 8,000 crore boost

Government’s estimated schematic budgetary expenditure on health, education and social protection for 2018-19 is Rs 1.38 trillion. Photo: HT

Government’s estimated schematic budgetary expenditure on health, education and social protection for 2018-19 is Rs 1.38 trillion. Photo: HT

New Delhi: To increase investment in higher educational institutions, the Union Cabinet today approved a proposal for expanding the scope of Higher Education Financing Agency (HEFA) by expanding its capital base to Rs 10,000 crore and tasking it to mobilise Rs 1 trillion by 2022.

Briefing reporters after the Cabinet meeting chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Union minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said the government wants to increase investments in higher education, for which an announcement was made in the last budget and HEFA was established.

“At that time its authorised capital was Rs 2,000 crore and now it has been increased to Rs 10,000 crore,” Prasad said, adding that earlier central government universities and other new varsities didn’t get advantage of HEFA but in today’s cabinet meeting, it was decided that they can utilise this fund.

In his Union Budget 2018, the then finance minister Arun Jaitley had announced a new initiative of the government—‘‘Revitalising Infrastructure and Systems in Education (RISE)”—to step up investments in research and related infrastructure in premier educational institutions, including health institutions. HEFA, a joint venture company of Canara Bank and Ministry of Human Resource Development which provides financial assistance for creation of educational infrastructure and R&D in India’s premier higher educational Institutions, was tasked to fund this initiative.

Government’s estimated schematic budgetary expenditure on health, education and social protection for 2018-19 is Rs 1.38 trillion against estimated expenditure of Rs 1.22 trillion in 2017-18.

[“Source-livemint”]