Indonesia: the world’s volcanic hotspot

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Indonesia, where more than 40,000 people have been evacuated over fears of an imminent volcanic eruption at Mount Agung on Bali, is the world’s most volcanic area.

The Southeast Asian archipelago of more than 17,000 islands and islets — and nearly 130 active volcanoes — is situated on the Pacific “Ring of Fire”, a vast zone of geological instability where the collision of tectonic plates causes frequent quakes and major volcanic activity.

Here are some of the country’s most deadly eruptions:

  • Tambora

In 1815, Mount Tambora on the island of Sumbawa explodes in one of the most violent eruptions in recorded history. An estimated 12,000 people die, while a resulting famine kills another 80,000.

  • Krakatoa

The island of Krakatoa is practically wiped off the map in 1883 by a volcanic explosion so powerful that it is heard some 4,500 kilometres (2,800 miles) away.

Around 36,000 people are killed in the eruption and the resulting tsunami. A new volcano emerges in 1928 on the same site.

  • Kelud

Mount Kelud, a Java island volcano, erupts in 1568, killing 10,000 people.

It takes another 5,000 lives in 1919.

In February 2014, 75,000 people are evacuated due to a forecast Kelud eruption.

  • Merapi

In 1930 an eruption in Java of Mount Merapi — considered one of the world’s most active and dangerous volcanoes — kills more than 1,300 people.

It erupts again in 2010, forcing 280,000 people to flee and killing more than 300 in what is considered its most powerful eruption since 1930.

Merapi is also one of the most densely populated volcanic sites: 12,000 people live on its slopes and a million people live under its threat.

  • Sinabung

In 2014, 16 people are killed after an eruption of Mount Sinabung on the western island of Sumatra.

Another eruption in 2016 kills seven.

  • Agung

In 1963, several successive eruptions of Mount Agung, a spiritual centre on the island of Bali, leave nearly 1,600 dead.

Source:-.nation.c

Indonesia Shrugs Off Pokemon Fatwa as Gaming Fever Takes Hold

Indonesia Shrugs Off Pokemon Fatwa as Gaming Fever Takes Hold

Avid players of smash-hit mobile phone game Pokemon Go in Indonesia, home to the world’s largest Muslim population, are not letting religious decrees or security warnings get in the way of their mission to catch their next cartoon creature.

Nintendo’s augmented reality app, in which players walk around real-life places to hunt virtual characters on their smartphone screens, has become an instant hit globally, almost doubling the market value of the Japanese game-maker.

But not everyone is cheering it.

(Also see: How to Download Pokemon Go APK, Install, and Play on Android)

Saudi Arabia’s top clerical body issued a fatwa, or religious edict, in 2001 that declared the Pokemon game franchise un-Islamic, saying it promotes gambling and the theory of evolution, among other concerns.

Saudi media on Wednesday said the body had renewed the fatwa though without mention of the newPokemon Go mobile game. Late on Thursday, an official at the country’s ministry of culture and information denied the edict had been renewed.

(Also see: Pokemon Go iOS: How to Download Pokemon Go for iPhone, iPad)

The Indonesian Ulema Council (MUI), the country’s top Muslim clerical body, has not made a formal statement on Pokemon Go, senior official Amidhan Shaberah told Reuters. But he said the game carries “more harm than benefits” as it can make people “intoxicated”, at the cost of their work or studies.

Indonesian security officials have said it could allow enemies to gather sensitive satellite data, according to local media. Officials have also banned people from playing in the presidential palace premises.

(Also see: How to Play Pokemon Go in India? Here’s Everything You Need to Know)

A spokeswoman at Pokemon Co, which produced the title with Nintendo, said the game was designed for enjoyment and not to promote social ills.

Pokemon Go has not been officially launched in the country of 250 million people – an enthusiastic adopter of social media apps – but tens of thousands of Indonesians are already getting it by using a proxy location on their smartphones that gives them access to app stores of other countries.

“I will not stop playing unless the reason is realistic,” said Mohammad Resja Ilham, a 24-year-old radio host who catches Pokemons on his way to work and back home, and up to five hours on weekends.

“I can meet new people when I play, it’s really fun.”

Businesses are also cashing in.

(Also see: Pokemon Go Needs These 6 Features for Continued Success in India and Elsewhere)

Indonesian telecommunication service provider PT XL Axiata Tbk is offering a 20 percent discount for certain 4G data packages to “take advantage of the Pokemon Go trend”, spokeswoman Turina Farouk told Reuters.

Last Saturday, Southeast Asian ride-hailing service Grab offered deals to Pokemon hunters who hopped on its vehicles to get to the National Monument in the Indonesian capital.

“People are crazy about it now,” said Ridzki Kramadibrata, Indonesia managing director for Grab. “I was there (the National Monument) myself and managed to catch some Pokemons.”

© Thomson Reuters 2016

Tags: Android, Apple, Gaming, iOS, Japan, Niantic, Nintendo, Pokemon, Pokemon Go

 

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Pokemon Go: Indonesia Bans Police, Military From Playing the Game

Pokemon Go: Indonesia Bans Police, Military From Playing the Game

Indonesia has ordered police not to play Pokemon Go while on duty and will soon ban military personnel as well, officials said Wednesday, as the defence minister warned the smartphone game was a security threat.

Indonesians have joined the frenzy for the game, which has become a worldwide hit since launching two weeks ago and has has already been blamed for a wave of crimes, traffic violations and complaints in cities around the globe.

(Also see: Pokemon Go Review)

Despite Pokemon Go not yet being officially available in Indonesia, many have downloaded it illegally and taken to the streets to hunt for virtual “pocket monsters”.

But its popularity has caused concern among the security establishment’s top echelons, with officials suggesting its high-tech capabilities could be put to use in spying.

(Also see:  Pokemon No: Trying, but Failing to Get the Popular Smartphone Game)

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“Spying can come in different forms,” said hardline Defence Minister Ryamizard Ryacudu.

“At first, it (Pokemon Go) appears cute but the longer you see… it is just not right.”

The military will soon issue an order banning all personnel from playing Pokemon Go during work hours as it seeks to protect high-security sites, military spokesman Tatang Sulaiman told AFP.

The order will note concerns that devices being used to play the game can send data over the Internet to other countries.

(Also see: How to Play Pokemon Go in India? Here’s Everything You Need to Know)

The announcement came after a Frenchman was briefly detained this week when he accidentally wandered onto a military base on Java island as he played Pokemon Go.

Police officers across the country were already sent an order on Tuesday banning them from playing the game while on duty, a spokesman said.

“We are worried that police officers may become addicted and we don’t want that because a police officer’s duty is to serve the public. The job requires hard work and concentration,” said national police spokesman Boy Rafli Amar.

(Also see: How to Download Pokemon Go on iPhone)

He also said police had been instructed to be on heightened alert for terror threats. Earlier this month, a suicide bomber attacked a police station in the city of Solo, injuring one officer.

Pokemon Go uses smartphone satellite location, graphics and camera capabilities to overlay cartoon monsters on real-world settings, challenging players to capture and train the creatures for battles.

Tags: Apps, Gaming, Niantic, Niantic Labs, Nintendo, Pokemon, Pokemon Go

 

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