Kevin Spacey just got fired from Ridley Scott’s new movie, a month before its release

Ridley Scott will completely remove Kevin Spacey from his upcoming biopic thriller All the Money in the World — with fewer than two months to go until the movie’s scheduled December 22 release.

According to Deadline, which first reported the news, Christopher Plummer will replace Spacey in the film’s most prominent supporting role. Scott’s drastic choice to cut Spacey from the movie will put it at risk of missing its December 22 release date, thus jeopardizing its Oscar eligibility.

The news follows a wave of sexual assault allegations made against Spacey by more than a dozen people, including multiple accusations of assault on underage victims.

Based on a true story, All the Money in the World details the harrowing 1973 kidnapping of J. Paul Getty’s 16-year-old grandson, J. Paul Getty III (Charlie Plummer, no relation), and Getty’s refusal to comply with the kidnappers’ demands. Spacey was set to play the elder Getty, and the decision to reshoot his role entirely, especially so close to the film’s release date, is extremely unprecedented.

The decision to cut Spacey from the film indicates how drastically Hollywood is reacting to the allegations against the actor

Though there have been other historical instances where an actor has been replaced during a film’s production, recasting a role or conducting extensive reshoots after a film has wrapped is rare, and usually only happens to this extent in the case of an unexpected death — for example, Paul Walker’s brothers standing in for reshoots of Furious 7 after his death.

That Scott and the All the Money in the World’s producers are willing to go to such lengths to essentially erase Spacey’s presence from the film speaks to how seriously Hollywood is taking the allegations of sexual assault that have been levied against him — or at least how desperate many people in the entertainment industry are to distance themselves from a man whose behavior was allegedly a longstanding open secret.

The decision comes after the film’s production studio, TriStar, abandoned what would have been an aggressive marketing and awards season campaign built around Spacey’s performance. The studio additionally pulled the film from what would have been an Oscar-bait slot at the American Film Institute’s November film festival. Regarding that decision, TriStar issued a statement, noting, “All the Money in the World is a superb film … But given the current allegations surrounding one of its actors and out of respect for those impacted, it would be inappropriate to celebrate at a gala at this difficult time.”

All the Money in the World features an ensemble cast including Michelle Williams and Mark Wahlberg. According to Deadline, the decision to replace Spacey and reshoot all of his scenes was “unanimous” among the film’s cast and crew.

Vox has reached out to Spacey’s representatives for comment.

Source:-VOX

Got an iPhone 6 Plus with ‘Touch Disease’? Apple Launches Program to Help Fix That

If you need the iPhone 6 Plus touch disease fix, Apple has launched a program to help owners of the devices find help for this frustrating defect.

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL) recently acknowledged that some iPhone 6 Plus devices may actually exhibit ‘Touch Disease’ symptoms, and has rolled out a program to help fix the “disease.”

The term ‘Touch Disease’ was coined on the internet to refer to the display flickering or Multi-Touch issues that surface after the iPhone 6 Plus undergoes stress, such as being bent several times or dropped on a hard surface.

Many iPhone 6 Plus users have in fact complained that the touchscreen will stop working entirely for several months. The issue reportedly stems from faulty chips inside the devices, according to repair site iFixit. When the iPhone 6 Plus is dropped or bent, the chips become loose.

Now, the California-based tech company has said it will repair affected iPhone 6 Plus devices for a service fee of $149 — as long as your screen isn’t cracked or broken, and the phone is in working order.

Although some iPhone 6 users have also reported the issue, Apple’s new ‘Touch Disease’ repair service, (officially named Multi-Touch Repair Program) only applies to the larger-sized iPhone 6 Plus for now.

Apple’s Multi-Touch Repair Program

According to the Support team on Apple’s official website, you must choose one of the following options prior to any service to verify that your iPhone 6 Plus is eligible for this program, and is in working order:

  • Apple Authorized Service Provider – Find one here.
  • Apple Retail Store – Make an appointment here.
  • Apple Technical Support – Contact us.

Once your device is cleared for repair, you are advised to back up your data to iTunes or iCloud before taking it to an Apple Authorized Service Provider for the repair service.

Apple added on its website that it will also reach out to iPhone 6 Plus users who may have already paid for a service repair related to this ‘Touch Disease’ issue, either through Apple or an Apple Authorized Service Provider to arrange reimbursement.

“The reimbursement amount will equal the difference between the price you paid for the original service to your iPhone 6 Plus and the $149 service price,” Apple wrote.

Apple’s Multi-Touch Repair Program covers affected iPhone 6 Plus devices worldwide for 5 years after the first retail sale of the unit, added the tech company.

Image: Apple

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Education in Sweden: “Then Things Got Interesting”

  • She was proud of her submission, not of her achievements.
  • Other than that, her email was full of post-modern nonsense such as science as a “belief” just like religion. In fact, science is doubt based on knowledge, while religion is certainty based on faith. Would she, I wondered, also “deconstruct” the Koran?
  • She had exercised her freedom only to give it up.

She was sitting there quietly in the middle of the classroom — a Swedish Muslim all dressed in black with a white powdered face. I was lecturing on John Stuart Mill at Sweden’s University West. What did I say? I said that while religion may not be true, it still gives people a sense of belonging and trust, and liberal society cannot give you that. The liberal soup is thin, and most of us want something richer, some kind of political main-course goulash. When people say that liberal society is empty, they actually mean this: I cannot give my life any purpose, so can someone kindly do it for me? Please hand me some grandiose message to live by because I cannot figure out anything on my own. Emptiness? Well, that could be another word for limitless opportunities.

Two days later, the Muslim student sent me an email. She accused me of not being “neutral”. She wrote that I had called religious people “pathetic”. I had not. She accused me of defaming Islam, herself as a woman and as an individual student.

As for Islam, I had never mentioned it, and as for her, I had never seen her before. Possibly in her vanity, she seemed to think the lecture was about her; in fact, it was about John Stuart Mill. She said (and this shook me a bit) that she would keep me “under surveillance”; she signed off with: “The student dressed in her pride”. Too bad she could not find something else about which to be proud. She was proud of her submission, not of her achievements. If you cannot give your life meaning, perhaps somebody will chip in and do it for you.

Other than that, her email was full of post-modern nonsense such as science as a “belief” just like religion. In fact, science is doubt based on knowledge, while religion is certainty based on faith. We had given her the tools of postmodernism, and here she was trashing the fabric of Western society. Would she, I wondered, also “deconstruct” the Koran?

But I was not bothered by her email, really. Students have the right to say all kinds of things, perhaps even to write inappropriate emails to their professors. It is, someone said, a human right not to “get it”. All it takes is to talk. If a student fails to understand the basic principles of a university — free inquiry, the need to question our views — the university will introduce the student to them. So I did not reply, but calmly awaited the next step by my department.

A few days later, an email requesting a meeting was sent out. But she never got it. I did. How odd, I thought, but I went there and, in front of a wide-eyed administrator, explained the rise of the modern university as a realm of free discussion, unhampered by the power of the state and the church; and spoke about the principles of free speech, and cited Karl Popper, Mill, George Orwell, Voltaire, and others on the way. She looked happy.

A few days later came another email. Now I was called in for consultations with Head of the Department and the Head Administrator. “Look”, I told them, “this is a university. Do you know what that means?” They said they did. “Do you know why I am here?” I gave them the answer. “For lecturing on John Stuart Mill.”

“Ten years ago,” I went on, “I wrote an article about a performance of Ideomeneo — a Mozart opera that was cancelled in Berlin because it might offend Muslim sensibilities. The title of the article was ‘The Enlightenment may end up as a historical parenthesis.’ Do you know what the Enlightenment is about?”

I looked at them and they looked back at me.

“We just want you to explain what happened,” they said. “I just did,” I said. “I lectured on Mill. Of course, if you are a religious fanatic, you must be horrified of Mill. If not, what are you doing at a university? I have to give her that.”

“She is just a curious student,” they said. They were nodding, one to the other. “She studied law, and is obviously interested in testing a case like this, isn’t she?” they said. “She is a gifted student, a very gifted student.” Two educated women were mistaking an assault against the modern world for reverence toward a student they thought was “independent.” It was a heart-breaking scene.

“Have you talked to her?”, I asked them.

“Well, no, we haven’t.”

“Perhaps you should,” I said. “You could talk to her about the university, and about freedom of expression.”

Putting a chill on freedom of speech: University West in Trollhättan, Sweden. (Image source: University West)

Then things got interesting. I got an email from a “Health Coordinator”. My health? Was something wrong with it? I thought this was an issue about differences of opinions. I thought about “mental corrections” in the Soviet Union, Arthur Koestler and George Orwell.

The health-coordinator turned out to be hands-on. He said his job was “to put an end to the whole thing.”

“And the woman,” I asked?

“She never showed up.” he said.

“She did not?”

“No.”

“Too bad,” I said. “She throws out accusations and threats, and then refuses to talk. Is that a good approach if you want to learn new things?” He gave me a faint smile, and I thought we agreed on something.

What is the point of going to university anyway? If you only want your views confirmed, then go to a Koran school. Why does this young woman attend a university, if we say things she cannot stand? She does it because she wants us to change.

Three? Five? I have lost count of how many more times I was summoned. What I do know is that I sent hundreds of letters during my “case”. Eventually, after interminable months, after lawyers and God knows who had “thoroughly investigated Mill, me and it,” I was “acquitted”. My lecture on Mill had, the “authorities” decided, “not been discriminatory” after all. What a surprise. But there was a serious side to it. A student pressed button D for Discrimination, and an academic was thrown into a pit of bureaucracy. The total cost? Do not even ask.

“Who ever will lecture on Mill when things like this can happen?” I asked them. “Do you understand the implications of bending over backwards to the enemies of an open society?”

Finally, case was closed. Or so I thought. Recently, I was told the student had taken the case to the Discrimination Ombudsman (Diskrimineringsombudsmannen) — the highest recourse in Sweden for cases such as this. A female student bids farewell to hundreds of years of the battle for women’s rights — suffragettes and feminist icons, socialists and liberals marching, conveying, demonstrating — and she does it, notably, out of her own free will. She had exercised her freedom only to give it up.

© 2016 Gatestone Institute. All rights reserved. The articles printed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Editors or of Gatestone Institute. No part of the Gatestone website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied or modified, without the prior written consent of Gatestone Institute.

[“source-ndtv”]

Got a Startup Tech Hardware Product to Sell? Try Grand St.

grand st.10

Grand St. aims to give independent hardware manufacturers a place to sell their products and to test prototypes.

If you’re looking to get any consumer electronic to the marketplace, there’s an arduous process involved. One of the biggest obstacles is getting funding for a venture that could miss the mark. Another is finding customers interested in your product.

Grand St. provides potential solutions for both problems.

Right now, the site is the place to get The Loop, a leather organizer that can charge your iPhone. There’s also a hackable alarm clock kit and an iOS enabled guitar for sale there, now.

Fortune says that the addition of independent manufacturers selling their gadgets on the site has turned it into the Etsy of the electronics world.

grand st.

On the official Grand St. blog, co-founder Amanda Peyton explains:

“Our goal has always been to create a better way for hardware creators to find an audience and get their products to market. For this new version of Grand St. we wanted to create a flexible solution that addressed indie hardware makers at different stages in the development cycle.”

The company says it now has about 200,000 users. And indie gadget makers have three ways to sell their new products through the site:

Consumer Ready

When you’re ready to sell the gadget you’ve created, you can list it through the Grand St. Shop. Grand St. says it previews and must approve any new listing. If a product doesn’t make the cut, Grand St. notifies the maker of its reasons for rejection.

If a product is approved and listed, the site takes an 8 percent commission on all sales. It takes the same commission on Beta sales. These are products that haven’t received any customer feedback and aren’t quite ready for a mass audience.

Beta

A Beta product maker can pick testers for the products and await their feedback. Based on the feedback, Grand St. says the maker of the product can then decide to seek more funding for changes or get the product ready for the marketplace or pre-order sales.

Pre-Order

If a product is within six months of being ready for the marketplace, it can be sold through a pre-order feature on Grand St. The site doesn’t take a commission on those sales and there are no monthly fees linked to selling on Grand St.

Sellers need to handle all their customer service and shipping commitments, the company notes in its seller guidelines.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]