Wipro investing in tech to help Fortune 500 cos exploit, monetise data: CEO

Wipro

Data is going to be the currency of the future and the company has invested heavily in it, Wipro CEO Abidali Neemuchwala has said.

“We are seeing a significant ability to transform customers in the data space, and we feel very upbeat about this because as you rightly said data is going to be the currency of the future and we are very heavily invested in this area,” he told PTI here.


When asked if Wipro had engaged start-ups to monetise data, which will create jobs and automatically check layoffs, he said, “The company has made strategic investments in about 12 startups and some kind of strategic alliance with another 20-22 startups, and out of them all at least 20 per cent of them are in data and data-related areas.”

Neemuchwala also said the company has invested in some very specific IPs which are internal company IPs, and also bagged a very significant deal with a customer couple of quarters back.

“They are in data business and we are using Wipro technology to help them support Chief Marketing Officers of Fortune 500 companies to utilise their data better and monetise their data better… So, we have leadership position in our analytic practice and our significant part of revenues comes from there.. We are seeing a significant ability to transform customers in data space,” he said.

Wipro President and Chief Operating Officer B M Bhanu Murthy said Wipro’s analytical business has grown significantly well this quarter.

To a query on the size of investment in data, Bhanu said the company’s investment in big data has been on a day-to-day discovery platform (DDP) which has gained significant traction in the last two quarters.

Bhanu further said the company is able to leverage DDP with a couple of its investments to help a lot of organisations mine huge data they collect and big data available externally, and hence it is seeing good traction and its investments are paying off through analytical.

[Source:-Businessstandard]

Mi Max 2 Launched, Xiaomi Sale, Jio’s Data Claim, Nokia 8 Leaks, and More: Your 360 Daily

Mi Max 2 Launched, Xiaomi Sale, Jio's Data Claim, Nokia 8 Leaks, and More: Your 360 Daily

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Xiaomi Mi Max 2 costs Rs. 16,999 in India
  • Nokia 8, leaked via images, expected to launch July 31
  • Reliance Jio claims to be biggest mobile data network in the world

Xiaomi launched its 6.44-inch Mi Max 2 in India on Tuesday carrying a price tag of Rs. 16,999. The highlights of the smartphone include a 5,300mAh battery, 12-megapixel f/2.2 rear camera with Sony’s IMX386 sensor, and 4GB of RAM. The Xiaomi Mi Max 2 runs MIUI 8 based on Android 7.1.1 Nougat, accompanied by a full-HD 2.5D curved glass screen that’s powered by an octa-core Snapdragon 625 SoC, and Adreno 506 GPU. In addition to the 12-megapixel sensor on the back, there’s a 5-megapixel f/2.0 front camera. Internal storage on the Mi Max 2 is 64GB, which is expandable via microSD card.

Xiaomi’s newest smartphone will be available first on July 20 at 12pm via Mi.com and Mi Home stores. Check out details of further sale dates of Xiaomi Mi Max 2. Reliance Jio has launch offers for the phone, which provides 10GB additional data on every recharge of Rs. 309 for a total of 10 recharges.

July 20 will also mark Xiaomi’s three-year anniversary in India, and it announced a two-day sale during the Mi Max 2 launch. The hard to buy Redmi 4 and Redmi Note 4 will be in stock during the anniversary sale, alongside new power banks and discounts on accessories. Xiaomi is also bringing back the Re. 1 flash sale, which will be offered on Redmi 4A, Wi-Fi Repeater 2, and the 10000mAh Mi Power Bank 2.

At the Mi Max 2 launch event, Xiaomi also talked about expanding the number of Mi Home stores across India, with two new outlets opening in Bengaluru later this month. First on Saturday, July 22, one will open in LIDO Mall, and the second in Orion Mall on the following Saturday, July 29.

Meanwhile in China, Xiaomi will launch the Mi 5X – a variant of the Mi 5 – on July 26, as per a teaser posted on its Weibo account. The phone is expected to have MIUI 9 running atop Android Nougat. In terms of hardware, per leaks, you can expect the Xiaomi Mi 5X to sport a 5.5-inch full-HD display, Snapdragon 625 SoC, and 4GB RAM. It’s expected to cost around CNY 1,999 (about Rs. 19,000).

Nokia 8 shows up in all its glory
The Nokia 8 has shown up in leaked press renders, which gives us the first good look at the premium device ahead of its launch on July 31. Expected to cost EUR 589 (about Rs. 43,400), the Nokia 8 is seen to have a vertical dual rear camera setup courtesy of HMD Global’s partnership with Carl Zeiss for optics. Beyond that, the phone is tipped to have a 5.3-inch QHD display, Snapdragon 835, 4/6GB RAM, and 64GB internal storage. Check out the leaked images of the Nokia 8.

Reliance Jio claims it’s the biggest mobile data network in the world
Reliance Jio is now the largest mobile data network in the world, carrying 15 percent of world traffic, the company’s President Devices Sunil Dutt claimed at Xiaomi’s event in New Delhi on Tuesday. Dutt added that Jio is the only exabyte network in the world, and it commands 85 percent of India’s mobile data consumption needs. He also brought up the previously mentioned statistic of data consumed per month, which has apparently gone up from 0.2 billion gigabytes to 1.2 billion gigabytes, with Jio contributing heavily to the rise.

Amazon and Flipkart host laptop sales
With college semesters in full swing, Amazon India and Flipkart are both hosting Back to College sales, providing deals, exchange offers, and No Cost EMI options on a variety of laptops. Amazon has seen fit to categorise laptops by student majors, such as Humanities, Engineering, MBA, and so forth. The cheapest option is Lenovo’s 15.6-inch Ideapad at Rs. 18,990. You can get Rs. 10,000 off on exchanging an old laptop, and two-year warranty for Rs. 1,499.

On Flipkart, the sale will run from July 18-20. You can get the 6th-gen Core i3-equipped HP Imprint for Rs. 35,964, and Microsoft’s Surface Pro 4 has 3-5 percent off. You can get up to Rs. 7,000 on exchange offer with the Imprint, and up to Rs. 20,000 on some gaming laptops.

iPhone 8 power button might house Touch ID, coming in November?
Apple might put Touch ID on the power button with iPhone 8, according to a new report. Owing to that implementation, which was revealed from a design file provided to a case-maker, the power button will apparently be slightly larger on the tenth-anniversary iPhone. The renders also add fuel to the vertical dual rear camera setup fire, along with the removal of the Home button from the front.

A second report reiterates the delay in the phone’s release, owing to the protracted development schedule. Apparently the iPhone 7s and iPhone 7s Plus, featuring minor upgrades to last year’s phones, will ship as usual, the iPhone 8 – which is expected to be more expensive – won’t be available until November.

Google Allo brings message reactions to its platform
A new update for Google Allo has added support for message reactions, with a heart emoji being your only option for now. That means the next time you wish to agree with someone, or send your love, you won’t have to head into the keyboard’s emoji drawer. There’s no word on when the new feature will be available to iOS users.

Huawei takes on Fitbit with Band 2 and Band 2 Pro
Huawei unveiled two new fitness trackers on Tuesday – the Band 2 and Band 2 Pro – which look a lot like the Fitbit Charge 2, right down to the dual-tone finish of the metallic centre. But unlike their Fitbit counterpart, the Huawei wearables are waterproof, and the Band 2 Pro has built-in GPS. Two additional features include Firstbeat – which helps assess VO2 max – and Breathing Coach, which is like Fitbit’s Relax and Apple Watch’s Breathe. Compatible with Android 4.4 or later, and iOS 8.0 or above, the Huawei Band 2 and Band 2 Pro will be available in Blue, Black, and Red band colours, though they have no release date or pricing info yet.

Flipkart reportedly ups Snapdeal acquisition offer by $100-150 million
After Snapdeal rejected Flipkart’s $800-850 million initial bid earlier in July, the latter is back with an upgraded buyout offer between $900-950 million, people familiar with the matter told Reuters. The revised offer includes Snapdeal’s marketplace and solutions provider Unicommerce, but excludes logistics arm Vulcan Express, and digital payments firm Freecharge. Infibeam has apparently made a proposal for acquiring Snapdeal as well, and the company is expected to reach a decision in the next 10 days.

Remix OS is no more, as Jide switches lanes
The Android-based Remix OS has been discontinued after its maker Jide decided to switch priorities from consumer to enterprise markets. In a post on its website, the company said that it sees “huge potential” with businesses, and it has decided to focus solely on that going forward. This also affects the all-in-one entertainment device Remix IO, which went up on Kickstarter last year. Jide said that it’d start refunding pre-orders from August 15.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Beyond open data: Insights through analytics

city analysis (Who is Danny/Shutterstock.com)

The federal government is taking big steps to share information and make data more free and open. Thanks to legislation like the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act, agencies are now required to post standardized spending data on the USASpending.gov site. Other initiatives, like the Government Publishing Office’s GovInfo.gov, let citizens use full-text searching and metadata to sift through decades of digitized content. It seems as if we are entering a new chapter of open data. But what, exactly can governments do with this data on hand? How do citizens and public officials make the most of this unprecedented level of access to information?

Analytics are what allows government to use “data as a flashlight, not as a hammer,” according to “A Practical Guide to Analytics for Governments,” recently produced by the team at the SAS Institute and published by Wiley.

The book celebrates information sharing and the wide range of data available on the municipal level in particular — from smart streetlights that also collect info on pedestrian foot traffic to rail equipment outfitted with sensors so that repairs can be made as needed, rather than on a maintenance schedule. (An innovation that Washingtonians inconvenienced by D.C. Metro’s months of “SafeTrack” repairs might envy). Overlaying of municipal code enforcement and police activity data reveals unexpected correlations between property neglect and crime, and having studied algebra in high school is connected to markedly higher income achievement later in life.

“Armed with insights” from shared data, officials in Arizona’s Pinal County used the strength of analytics to more effectively understand already-existing health data in a way that would better protect the public from heat stroke. Investigators were surprised to discover that analytics revealed the highest threat of heat-related illness was not found among the elderly — as had been expected — but instead, among the young people of this Arizona community.

Small agencies can benefit from analytics as much as larger ones.  The book’s authors make the case that smaller cities may be best positioned to take advantage of technology advances because there is “less infrastructure to retrofit.” Since only 300 U.S. cities have populations that exceed 100,000, they add, the opportunities for data-driven innovation are substantial.

State-level open-data success stories are also hailed, most especially the example of  North Carolina, which “opened its 2017 budget for citizen scrutiny” with a new visual analytics tool.

But more important than making data itself available, the authors argue, is recognizing the challenge of melding data into analytics. After all, they assert, “typical government IT projects are built in a siloed approach,” which means that while agencies have torrents of data, often not a drop is shared. Teachers are not given the opportunity to proactively provide remedial attention to students. Police don’t have background information to help them approach a suspect with either greater caution or more compassion.  The book also looks at applications in transportation, public health, child welfare, prescription drug abuse, fraud prevention, and it methodically lays out both the depth of missed opportunities and the possibility of a brighter future.

As government at every level updates its IT assets, the book warns CIOs that “[a]cquiring technology for technology’s sake … rarely achieves the expected outcome.” Instead, the book makes the case that the emphasis should be on “building an analytics-driven government” and leveraging data to “build stronger analytics capabilities.”

“A Practical Guide to Analytics for Government” lives up to its title and concludes with a specific suggested solution. Establishing an official center of analytics, the authors write, can help agencies create a keen awareness of the importance of “building common competency … [that] enhances government analytic success through shared experience.”

Some cities have begun to work in that direction, and the City of Boston’s Citywide Analytics Team and the New York City’s Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics are hailed for seeking “innovative ways to leverage data.”

Such efforts could even unite an otherwise polarized political community, the authors suggest, since “both Republicans and Democrats value opening the public’s business to citizens.” Indeed, they contend that during a time when the citizens increasingly distrust political leadership, “open data can . . . promote legitimacy.”

More importantly, though, the authors stress that governments at all levels should be “breaking down barriers to sharing and accessing information … to ensure frontline workers, management, and policymakers have the knowledge they need.”   After all, as Shawn P. McCarthy, research director of IDC Government Insights, is quoted as saying about this book, “in many ways, modern government is information.”

[“Source-gcn”]

Data Lakes: Insights From The Deep

Data Lakes: Insights from the Deep

The next generation of big data technology will lead to insights and correlations that reveal new strategies and even new business models.

I recently wrote an article called Data Lakes: Insight from the Deep with SAP Big Data expert John Schitka. It includes best practices for implementing data lakes in your organization, which are complementary to traditional data warehouses:

“There have been so many millions of dollars going to data warehousing over the last two decades. The idea that you’re just going to move it all into a data lake isn’t going to happen” — Mike Ferguson, managing director of Intelligent Business Strategies, a UK analyst firm.

The article includes some real-world examples of Big Data usage and business models.

Prescriptive farming

The Climate Corporation uses a data lake to collect massive amounts of agricultural data and applies machine-learning techniques to help farmers optimize their planting.

Predictive maintenance for trains

SAP Customer CSX is a transportation company in Florida. Previously, raw data from wheel bearings sensors could only be kept for 10 days because of volume restrictions. Using a data lake based on SAP HANA and Hadoop, the company is now able to keep it as long as it likes, and look for deeper correlations with information from other sensors.

Combatting insider trading

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) regulates broker behavior in the United States. It uses a data lake and algorithms to find the patterns of fraud that human analysts might miss.

For more on these themes — and much, much more, check out the Digitalist Magazine Executive Quarterly, best consumed using the iPhone/Ipad on iTunes or the Android application on Google Play.

[“Source-ndtv”]