A nine-year-old reviews the Tesla Model X

Editor’s Note: Verge transportation editor Tamara Warren regularly rides and reviews all the latest and greatest from the automotive industry, which means that as a by-product, her son Benicio also gets to take a spin from time to time. Her review of the Tesla Model S published earlier this month, so we wondered what nine-year-old Benicio thought of the Tesla experience. Below are his honest thoughts. —Natt Garun

I have been in lots of cars because my mom works for The Verge and she gets a new car every week. The name of this car is the Tesla Model X.

This car has new and improved car features from the cars I have been in. My favorite feature is the falcon door, so I’m going to start with that. They open by pressing a silver rectangle that is in the place a regular door handle would be for the car. After you press that, the door will start to open. If you want to open the door from the inside, you will have to push the button on the door frame. You can press the top of the button to open it and push the bottom of it to close it.

When we picked up the car at the Tesla store in Brooklyn, a man named David told Shrey, one of my best friends, and me about it. I took notes as I was listening to David, and then we were ready to jump in the car.

When we went outside, we were fascinated by the car’s design. The key is the same shape as the car. You can push any part of the key and open the trunk, the doors, or the extra trunk in the front. I would use the space to put extra baseball gear in there.

David was driving the car, but he told me to sit up in the front. He told us why the car was already on. It turns out that when the car senses the key it automatically turns on, and when you are in the car the driver will start driving. If you use Autopilot, it will even take over the steering, but David told me you should still keep your hands on the wheel.

David showed us how to navigate by pressing a huge screen and going to the map section. After he showed us that, we were ready to start driving. Shrey said the car was really cool, so that got me hyped up about it.

After that, David showed us how it could park itself. When the car finds a parking spot, it will pop up on the screen and ask you if you want to park there. If you say yes, it will park.

This car isn’t powered by energy from the sun. It’s just powered by a ton of batteries. You don’t have to use gas. All you have to do is find an outlet and plug it in and it will start charging. If you Supercharge the car, it will be full in as fast as 20 minutes.

My second favorite thing on the Model X is when you put it in Ludicrous Mode. You get to it by selecting the options on the screen. When you click on the selection, it will show you a kind of thing like hyperspace from Star Wars. Then when you drive, it will go a lot faster. So when David started driving, we put our heads back on the seats, and then we were going really fast and other people on the street didn’t even notice us. (That’s because there is no gas engine, so the car doesn’t make any noise.) I would think twice before crossing the street, if I saw a Tesla in the neighborhood.

I’m really energetic when I just sit around and I’m also a pitcher for the Huskies, our local travel baseball team. So after we finished the demonstration, Shrey and I took a break to act out the Detroit Tigers vs. New York Yankees. After that, we said goodbye to David and I headed to Coney Island with Shrey and my dad. The radio in the car is really good personally to me, because we got to listen to my favorite song “Lose Yourself” by Eminem on the way there.

As we were driving, we kept on asking my dad to do what David did and try Ludicrous Mode. But he kept saying no. (If any kids are reading: try to beg your parents to let you go fast in the car.)

[“Source-theverge”]

4 New LG X Series Phones Focus on Different Feature Sets

4 New LG X Series Phones Focus on Different Feature Sets

Smartphone makers are doing all they can to come up with the next best thing and until now, each attempt was designed to put more of the best technology in a single device. But there is only so much you can put in a form factor as small as a smartphone.

The new approach by LG takes a step back and deploys devices that specialize in one particular aspect of smartphone technology above all others. The four new LG X phones are part of a series the company launched earlier this year.

Introducing the LG X Series

The first two phones, the X Cam and X Screen focused, as the names suggests, on the camera and screen. This time around the new phones called X Power, X Mach, X Style and X Max also focus on different components.

The new X series phones share many of the base specs of LG’s flagship G and V series handsets, but they add on the specialized features. The information LG made available on these phones is very limited, so we will have to wait until they are released later this month to find out the exact specifications. The price and availability for each device will be announced locally in each market.

The X Power

This phone has one of the largest battery capacities of any smartphone on a slim 7.99mm body with 4,100mAh (Samsung Edge 7 has 3600 mAh and the Apple iPhone 6 Plus has 2915 mAh). So the power is considerably more than the top brands in the segment. Additionally, LG said the company’s fast charging (PE+) technology allows the X Power to be charged twice as fast.

The X Mach

The X Mach is built for speed and performance, with support for LTE Cat. 9 3CA for faster data transfer and a 1.8GHz processor to manage power intensive applications. It also has a QHD IPS Quantum display, a curved form factor and a large 1.55m sensor camera.

The X Style

According to LG, the X Style differentiates itself with curving lines, extra-slim body, and a large display. It is made to consume multimedia content.

The X Max

LG has provided even less information for the X Max than for the other three phones, with the company saying only that it has a “Large display” — but the size of the screen hasn’t been made available either.

The New LG Strategy

LG doesn’t even appear on the list of “Top Five Smartphone Vendors, Shipments, Market Share and Year-Over-Year Growth, Q1 2016 Preliminary Data” by IDC. How will the company’s strategy pan out as most other manufacturers adopt a more-is-better approach for their devices?

The company might find an audience with small businesses that need the specific technologies the X series of phones bring. Still a full set of specs and more importantly a menu of prices must be available before business owners can know if the phones are worthwhile.

Image: LG Electronics

More in: Gadgets

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

The Moto X Pure Edition is an Anti-Bloatware Smartphone

Usefulness
Functionality
Price

Summary


Most smartphones are sold with carrier bloatware on top of manufacturer bloatware, but the value of a phone that’s “pure Android” is to eliminate much of that annoyance.

The Moto X Pure Edition is the third and latest iteration of the Moto X, and surprisingly priced lower than 2014’s Moto X. It’s the first Motorola phone with which Lenovo has been involved. And the device may become best known for what it doesn’t have rather than for what it does.

Key Moto X Pure Edition Features

The Moto X Pure Edition, is now larger, with a 5.7-inch 520 ppi Quad HD LCD screen. It retains many of the quick functions of older Moto X iterations, but this time around has a microSD card slot to expand file storage capacity to 128GB.

The overall size of the new Moto X isn’t too large or too small, but will feel slightly heavier to seasoned flagship smartphone users.

Twist-of-the-wrist camera activation is still a signature feature. As with 2013’s original Moto X, this model also encourages you to use your voice to initiate commands, such as sending texts by dictating words to someone in your contacts list.

You can also activate a useful flashlight by moving the phone downward, quickly and twice. In sunlight, the screen on the new Moto X is great if you turn the brightness up.

Moto X Pure Edition Pros

Moto X Pure Edition Android smartphone reviewThe Moto X is sold unlocked and is surprisingly designed to work on all of the four major U.S. carriers. According to Motorola, the phone operates on the following wireless bands: GSM/GPRS/EDGE: 850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHzUMTS/HSPA+: 850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz CDMA 800, 850, 1900 MHz4G LTE B1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 13, 17, 25, 26, 38, 41.

Bloatware was deliberately left out of previous Moto X phones and the trend continues on this year’s Moto X. It uses a 1.8GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 with hexa-core processor which works well running multiple apps, using 3GB of RAM.

The TurboPower 25 charger is included and provides even faster charging, when compared to the charger included with the ASUS ZenFone 2. Motorola’s charger also didn’t get hot.

The backspace key on the keyboard thankfully deletes one character at a time, at a sane speed, unlike Samsung keyboards which overzealously delete on a long press. You can also program custom shortcuts in the Moto X’s “Personal Dictionary” setting, such as “hhh” for “http://”. This function is extremely useful to people who regularly use ‘text expander’ apps designed for desktop computers.

Pricing starts at $399.99 for the 16GB version, but can exceed $525 for higher GB versions with special backs. Unlike the previous Moto X smartphones, this one has a microSD card. The water-repellent nano-coating is a plus.

Moto X Pure Edition Cons

Putting the new Moto X through several heavy usage stress tests, the battery life just wasn’t that impressive. It also has a sealed battery, which means Motorola-licensed businesses are the only people who should access the battery for any reason. While the battery life isn’t awful, you can’t help wishing it was better on this model.

It takes time to get familiar with the interface on the Moto X Pure Edition which controls the ringer volume. It can easily be mistaken for the alarm volume controller.

Whites on the screen can sometimes appear as ‘eggshell white’, instead of crisp white.

Some people also might feel the Moto X Pure Edition phone flirts with the privacy line. For example, if you utilize Google Now, the Moto X can always remind you to pick up your dry cleaning if you’re near a dry cleaner you’ve designated.

Some users might find this useful and hard to live without, while other people might not appreciate it, and leave these ‘smart’ bonuses dormant. In either case, Google Now is optional.

A final con is that the phone is currently only available through online ordering.

Who Moto X Pure Edition Is Best For

This is a great phone for people who don’t touch smartphone bloatware and are also tired of tolerating it. Many Android users who have HTC or LG phones can say goodbye to bloatware by switching to Motorola.

There’s much to love about this affordably-priced model. If you ask yourself what makes a great smartphone, answers are often about processor speed, reliable connectivity, ease of use, and having a large number of free apps from which to choose. The Moto X Pure Edition delivers on all four points and much more. The cons are very minor.

Image: Alex H. Yong

Motorola provided the writer of this review with a complimentary Moto X Pure Edition. All opinions found in this review originate solely from the writer.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

The Moto X Pure Edition is an Anti-Bloatware Smartphone

Usefulness
Functionality
Price

Summary


Most smartphones are sold with carrier bloatware on top of manufacturer bloatware, but the value of a phone that’s “pure Android” is to eliminate much of that annoyance.

The Moto X Pure Edition is the third and latest iteration of the Moto X, and surprisingly priced lower than 2014’s Moto X. It’s the first Motorola phone with which Lenovo has been involved. And the device may become best known for what it doesn’t have rather than for what it does.

Key Moto X Pure Edition Features

The Moto X Pure Edition, is now larger, with a 5.7-inch 520 ppi Quad HD LCD screen. It retains many of the quick functions of older Moto X iterations, but this time around has a microSD card slot to expand file storage capacity to 128GB.

The overall size of the new Moto X isn’t too large or too small, but will feel slightly heavier to seasoned flagship smartphone users.

Twist-of-the-wrist camera activation is still a signature feature. As with 2013’s original Moto X, this model also encourages you to use your voice to initiate commands, such as sending texts by dictating words to someone in your contacts list.

You can also activate a useful flashlight by moving the phone downward, quickly and twice. In sunlight, the screen on the new Moto X is great if you turn the brightness up.

Moto X Pure Edition Pros

Moto X Pure Edition Android smartphone reviewThe Moto X is sold unlocked and is surprisingly designed to work on all of the four major U.S. carriers. According to Motorola, the phone operates on the following wireless bands: GSM/GPRS/EDGE: 850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHzUMTS/HSPA+: 850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz CDMA 800, 850, 1900 MHz4G LTE B1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 13, 17, 25, 26, 38, 41.

Bloatware was deliberately left out of previous Moto X phones and the trend continues on this year’s Moto X. It uses a 1.8GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 with hexa-core processor which works well running multiple apps, using 3GB of RAM.

The TurboPower 25 charger is included and provides even faster charging, when compared to the charger included with the ASUS ZenFone 2. Motorola’s charger also didn’t get hot.

The backspace key on the keyboard thankfully deletes one character at a time, at a sane speed, unlike Samsung keyboards which overzealously delete on a long press. You can also program custom shortcuts in the Moto X’s “Personal Dictionary” setting, such as “hhh” for “http://”. This function is extremely useful to people who regularly use ‘text expander’ apps designed for desktop computers.

Pricing starts at $399.99 for the 16GB version, but can exceed $525 for higher GB versions with special backs. Unlike the previous Moto X smartphones, this one has a microSD card. The water-repellent nano-coating is a plus.

Moto X Pure Edition Cons

Putting the new Moto X through several heavy usage stress tests, the battery life just wasn’t that impressive. It also has a sealed battery, which means Motorola-licensed businesses are the only people who should access the battery for any reason. While the battery life isn’t awful, you can’t help wishing it was better on this model.

It takes time to get familiar with the interface on the Moto X Pure Edition which controls the ringer volume. It can easily be mistaken for the alarm volume controller.

Whites on the screen can sometimes appear as ‘eggshell white’, instead of crisp white.

Some people also might feel the Moto X Pure Edition phone flirts with the privacy line. For example, if you utilize Google Now, the Moto X can always remind you to pick up your dry cleaning if you’re near a dry cleaner you’ve designated.

Some users might find this useful and hard to live without, while other people might not appreciate it, and leave these ‘smart’ bonuses dormant. In either case, Google Now is optional.

A final con is that the phone is currently only available through online ordering.

Who Moto X Pure Edition Is Best For

This is a great phone for people who don’t touch smartphone bloatware and are also tired of tolerating it. Many Android users who have HTC or LG phones can say goodbye to bloatware by switching to Motorola.

There’s much to love about this affordably-priced model. If you ask yourself what makes a great smartphone, answers are often about processor speed, reliable connectivity, ease of use, and having a large number of free apps from which to choose. The Moto X Pure Edition delivers on all four points and much more. The cons are very minor.

Image: Alex H. Yong

Motorola provided the writer of this review with a complimentary Moto X Pure Edition. All opinions found in this review originate solely from the writer.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]