Samsung Bixby 2.0 to Be Unveiled Next Year, Will Work on Multiple Devices in the Home

Samsung Bixby 2.0 to Be Unveiled Next Year, Will Work on Multiple Devices in the Home

South Korean technology major Samsung will introduce the second edition of its voice-powered digital assistant ‘Bixby’ next year that will work on multiple devices, including televisions and refrigerators, a top company official said Thursday.

This will help the global smartphone leader further strengthen its position against companies like Google, Apple, and Amazon that also have virtual assistants – Google Assistant, Siri, and Alexa, respectively.

“We would introduce Bixby 2.0 in 2018… it would be designed to be available on any and all devices,” Samsung Electronics V-P, Mobile Communications Business, Ji Soo Yi told reporters in Seoul.

He added that “this means having the intelligence of Bixby act as the control hub of device ecosystem, including mobile phones, TVs, refrigerators…”.

Bixby 2.0 would have “one work on one platform” command structure and would integrate all operating systems like Android and Samsung’s Tizen.

However, Yi did not divulge the month of the planned launch of the new version of the voice assistance software. Named after a bridge in California, US, Samsung had introduced Bixby in May this year globally on its premium smartphones like Galaxy S8, Galaxy S8+, and Galaxy Note 8.

Asked whether Samsung would extend Bixby to other Samsung phones, Yi said: “Yes, we would.” However, he did not share the models on which Bixby will be extended to.

“We are getting it ready to work with more languages,” he said, adding that “Hindi could probably be among the first five languages the company will have first”.

Samsung will also invite local linguistic experts to develop the local language command in the second phase.

“Self-sustainable ecosystem is essential because that is the only way to support users’ growing personal need,” Yi said.

India is a huge market for Samsung for mobile phones and consumer electronics.

The company has maintained its leadership position in the burgeoning and dynamic Indian smartphone market, commanding 24 percent share at the end of June 2017 quarter.

In the consumer durables segment, Samsung is a leading brand in TV panels, microwaves and frost-free refrigerators. It had recently launched an Internet of Things-enabled washing machine.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

5 Reasons Budgeting Apps Don’t Work For Most People

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Can we all agree that one of the secrets to achieving financial independence is figuring out a way to spend less than you make? OK, good. Then why aren’t more of us better at it? Credit card debt levels are the highest they’ve ever been. Clearly, finding a way to budget is a bit of a holy grail for many people.

The thing is, there is no perfect way to track or control spending. The way people make spending decisions varies as much as the number of ways to order at Starbucks so as a financial coach, I’m always on the look-out for new ways to make it simple and painless. In other words, I’m in search of the My Fitness Pal for money.

However, I’m not so sure an app is what’s going to move the needle. In fact, using a screen to make financial decisions may actually promote bad behavior. How many times has a notification popped up that lead to you filling a digital cart? Here’s why I think we need to stop trying to find the perfect app and instead master the pen and paper or spreadsheet way of tracking money:

1. It’s too easy to ignore. If I had a dollar for every person that confessed that they tried Mint, but eventually the text alerts and notifications started driving them crazy, I could afford a personal chef. Yes, money apps can help you set alerts to notify you when you’re coming close to overspending, but they can easily get lost in the myriad of more fun notifications that already flood your screen. Just nagging isn’t enough to actually keep money in your account.

2. You still have to actually maintain it. No software is perfect. So even if you are able to effectively link your apps to all of your accounts for an accurate look at where you are, you still need to log in regularly to make sure it is categorizing correctly.

If you’re trying to track spending on dining out and booze, you have to go in and make sure it doesn’t think your liquor store is a grocery store (that happened), and what happens when you buy wine while grocery shopping or if your restaurant lunch is actually reimbursed by work? You have to manually fix that stuff, and if you don’t do it regularly, it will become too much. You might as well use that time maintaining a spreadsheet.

3. My Fitness Pal doesn’t actually stop the chips from going in my mouth. You can have your phone tell you six ways ‘til Sunday that you’ve blown your calorie allotment for the day before you even get to dinner, but unless I’m in the first four days or so of tracking, I’m probably still going to eat before I go to bed. Financial apps work the same way. They give you the data, but only you can take that next step of keeping the money in your account.

4. My brain is changing and I don’t like it. I do think I’m addicted to my iPhone. My compulsion to check email when I’m already feeling overwhelmed with tasks is constant, even when I don’t actually want to be working.

I’ve also noticed that it’s become totally socially acceptable to be texting, Facebooking, Instagramming, Snapchatting, etc. while hanging out with friends. I hate that! Adding financial management to my phone just exacerbates the problem. So I’m putting the phone down and I think you should too.

5. We notice what we pay attention to. When I purchased my Mini Cooper, “Sheldon”, I was excited about the white racing stripes that I thought made him unique. Then I started to notice how many other electric blue Mini Coopers had white racing stripes.

Was there a sudden surge in the popularity of this style? No. I just started noticing it.

The same thing goes for your money. I started tracking my net worth on a monthly basis a couple of years ago. Nothing complicated – I just list all my accounts and about the same time each month, I add a new column with their current balances.

I love watching the amount grow in my 401(k) while seeing the value decrease on my car loan. And I LOVE putting a big fat zero down in the student loan line these days! This is a great way for me to make sure I’m checking in on my money at least monthly and it is fun to watch my net worth slowly but steadily increase. Try it and see if it doesn’t also get you starting to track other things like how much you spent the previous month on carry-out dinners.

There is one thing I think you can use your phone to help with and that’s checking your bank account daily. Every morning when you’re doing that first check to see what you missed on social media, add in a quick check of your bank account to see if anything funky posted overnight. This can save you from expensive overdrafts and help you catch fraud much sooner.

[“Source-forbes”]

Forget essays, more ‘objective’ questions likely in UP exams to simplify evaluation work

VCs conference

A number of interesting decisions were taken at the vice-chancellors’ conference held today in Lucknow, including increasing teaching days from 180 to 220 and use of technology in classes. However, the decision to introduce a “mix of objective and descriptive type of questions,” in examinations from next year, to simplify the work evaluators, was somewhat surprising.

In a media briefing after the conference of VCs of universities from all over Uttar Pradesh, the deputy chief minister Dinesh Sharma said that from next year the university will introduce objective type questions in examinations to ‘simplify’ evaluation work.

Sharma said evaluation of answers to descriptive type questions took time.Question papers would now have a mix of objective and descriptive type of questions.

Would the education system benefit from a system where answers in university and college-level examinations are required to be short just to make an evaluator’s work easy?

This is a question that demands a lengthy response.

 

 

[“source-hindustantimes”]

Pinterest Introduces Search Ads, Here’s How They Work

Pinterest Search Ads Have Arrived -- Here’s How They Work

Pinterest recently introduced a Search Ads feature with a dozen new clients who will now join a batch of brands including Target, eBay and Home Depot already testing the new service.

“We’re excited to introduce Search Ads on Pinterest: a new way to connect with people searching for your products and services,” said head of global sales John Kaplan in an official post on the Pinterest for Business Blog. “We’re rolling out a full suite of features, including Keyword and Shopping Campaigns that are shown in search results, along with powerful new targeting and reporting options.”

A Look at Pinterest Search Ads

Until now, you could only run Ads using promoted pins, but these ads would only appear alongside relevant searches. Now, with the update, the ads will appear right after someone types in searches.

The ads will run like all PPC campaigns and they will be automatically created from the product inventory, so advertisers will have the option to pay for impressions, pin clicks and engagement.

Additionally, the social network introduced ad groups, which work almost the same way they do on Bing or Google. Bids are optimized at the keyword level, and marketers have the ability to see insights into how users are Pinning images, including the names they are using to save the information.

For now, the service will only be available to a few select advertisers through the Kenshoo platform, but expect this to change in the coming months as additional third-party providers get into the game. It is also highly-likely that at some point Pinterest will introduce a self-service platform.

Pinterest reaches 150 million unique monthly users and sees more than 2 billion searches per month, most of them for services and products people want to buy. The Search Ads update will definitely make the platform even better for advertising.

Image: Pinterest

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[“source-smallbiztrends”]